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Abstract

We assessed math anxiety in 6th- through 12th-grade children ( N = 564) as part of a comprehensive longitudinal investigation of children's beliefs, attitudes, and values concerning mathematics. Confirmatory factor analyses provided evidence for two components of math anxiety, a negative affective reactions component and a cognitive component. The affective component of math anxiety related more strongly and negatively than did the worry component to children's ability perceptions, performance perceptions, and math performance. The worry component related more strongly and positively than did the affective component to the importance that children attach to math and their reported actual effort in math. Girls reported stronger negative affective reactions to math than did boys. Ninth-grade students reported experiencing the most worry about math and sixth graders the least. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2012 APA, all rights reserved)
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... Presently, MA commonly refers to a state of fear and apprehension when one is engaging with math (Ashcraft & Krause, 2007) and is regarded as a primarily emotional response (Mammarella et al., 2015). It should be acknowledged that although most studies conceptualize MA as a single factor, some researchers suggest that MA consists of two dimensions: cognitive and affective (Wigfield & Meece, 1988). The cognitive dimension broadly refers to one's thoughts and concerns about math performance while the affective dimension includes one's emotions like nervousness regarding math testing (Wigfield & Meece, 1988). ...
... It should be acknowledged that although most studies conceptualize MA as a single factor, some researchers suggest that MA consists of two dimensions: cognitive and affective (Wigfield & Meece, 1988). The cognitive dimension broadly refers to one's thoughts and concerns about math performance while the affective dimension includes one's emotions like nervousness regarding math testing (Wigfield & Meece, 1988). ...
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Math anxiety is a highly prevalent problem in education that has consistently shown to lead to poor math performance. This study sought to investigate whether certain behaviours are predictive of math anxiety among students. This study involved elementary school students who were low-progressing in math, and is part of an educational intervention program. Ten classifications types of behavioural indicators were identified, such as counting out loud. A multiple linear regression was conducted, identifying three behavioural observations that were positively and significantly associated with their math anxiety. Implications and limitations are discussed.
... The struggles of School of Business students in quantitative courses are a common theme in our review. These struggles turn into negative attitudes and anxiety toward mathematics, which is displayed in academic performance and career opportunities as well documented in the literature (Wigfield and Meece 1988;Meece et al. 1990;Bessant 1995;Singh et al. 2017). Attitude, anxiety, confidence, and one's mathematical preparedness have some bearing on one's selection of major within business, with students that struggle quantitatively gravitating toward majors like marketing (Schlee et al. 2007), with ease of completion often being a significant consideration for marketing majors (Davies and Tikoo 2018). ...
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... For instance, correlations vary in size from null and small to moderate [21][22][23][24]. They tend to be greater in females than males [24,25], but not always [26,27]. For instance, Ma [28] and Zhang et al. [29] found no gender differences in the correlation between math anxiety and math performance. ...
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... The importance of success in a task is determined by the importance of that task to an individual's sense of self, such that if a student perceives a task as important to their identity, they may exert the effort required for successful performance (Wigfield & Eccles, 2000). Seemingly consistent with these theoretical views, extant research has found positive associations of these value beliefs with achievement-related outcomes (Eccles & Wigfield, 1995;Fredricks & Eccles, 2002;Guo, Marsh, Morin, Parker, & Kaur, 2015a;Guo et al., 2017;Guo et al., 2015b;Jacobs et al., 2002;Marchand, & Gutierrez, 2016;Simpkins et al., 2006;Wang, & Eccles, 2013;Wigfield & Meece, 1988). However, with few exceptions (cf. ...
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