Article

Leisure of opiate addicts at posttreatment follow-up

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Abstract

Follow-up data for 1,174 opiate addicts were used to examine leisure reported prior to an interview conducted approximately 6 yrs after admission to treatment for drug abuse. Comparisons of self-reported leisure for the pre- and posttreatment follow-up periods showed an overall shift toward more positive, socially accepted leisure activities at follow-up; more free time was spent with family and with friends who did not use drugs. In addition, positive leisure at follow-up, as well as more positive changes in leisure over time, were related to favorable outcomes on drug use, criminality, and productive activities measures during the year before the follow-up interview. (9 ref) (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2012 APA, all rights reserved)

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... Few studies have examined the self-reported activities of former substance users in aftercare to determine what activities might be helpful to sustain recovery. Persons addicted to opiates who increased leisure activities such as reading, exercise, and watching television increased engagement with people who did not use drugs and had more positive outcomes over time after treatment (Simpson, Crandall, Savage, & Pavia-Krueger, 1981). A study conducted by Sinyor, Brown, Rostant, and Seraganian (1982) examining exercise as an adjunct to treatment for alcoholism found that 69% of participants in treatment with an exercise program had remained abstinent compared to 38% who did not exercise. ...
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... There are several factors associated with using substances less and/or having a lower risk of criminal recidivism. These factors are involvement in prosocial activities (Aguilar & Munson, 1992;Hoge, Andrews & Leschied, 1996;Mahoney, 2000;Simpson, Crandall, Savage, & Pavia-Krueger, 1981) and having positive role models and neighborhood social capital (Patterson, DeBaryshe & Ramsey, 1989;Sampson, 1999). ...
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