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Basic readings in psychology.

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Abstract

"Perhaps one of the best criteria of a book's present significance is whether or not it is deemed important enough to be chosen to appear on the reading lists for graduate students preparing for their doctoral examinations. With this criterion in mind, letters were sent to all American and Canadian psychology departments granting doctor's degrees in 1953-54 and again, five years later in 1958-59." Listed are books recommended by ½ or more departments in 1958-59, books recommended by ⅓-½ the departments in 1958-59, and additional books recommended by ½ the departments in 1953-54 but not listed by ⅓ in 1958-59. "The basic readings in psychology today may then be represented by the 30 books recommended by at least a third of the psychology departments." (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2012 APA, all rights reserved)

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Many psychiatric education programs distribute reading lists to students and residents but these lists rapidly become out of date. The authors polled experts in 20 psychiatric specialty areas, asking for up to ten recent publications of lasting value. Nearly 1300 citations were received from over 200 respondents. The authors discuss the Jack of consensus by experts in areas such as neurobiology and psychopharrnacoiogy as well as the much higher proportion of books (versus articles) cited by experts from psychosocial compared to biological specialty areas.
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Article
Reports on survey data on recommended reading from 163 departments granting a doctoral degree in psychology in the US and Canada. The book recommended by half or more of the 38 departments with individualized reading lists was Theories of Personality by C. S. Hall and G. Lindzey (1978). Other frequently recommended books are listed. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2012 APA, all rights reserved)
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Article
What are the most important books in pastoral care and counseling? Which works are most often recommended to students studying in this area? The literature of a particular discipline serves as an instrument to measure the growth and development of that discipline as well as its present orientation. The field of pastoral care and counseling is no exception. Identification of the most frequently recommended literature in pastoral care and counseling would be beneficial to clergymen, educators, and theological students in helping to suggest possible bibliographies in this area. Perhaps one of the best ways to ascertain a given book's present significance for a field is to find out whether or not it is included in reading lists prepared for students in that discipline. Up to this time, no study of this kind has ever been attempted in the area of pastoral care and counseling. There have been such efforts done in the field of psychology. Sundberg reported the results of two surveys performed in 1953-54 and 1958-59 in which he studied the basic readings in psychology through a survey of American and Canadian psychology departments. 1 Solso and Johnson replicated the early Sundberg studies in 1967 and again in 1971 to determine which works remained as "classics" and which were "emerging classics. ''2' 3 In each of these studies, the whole of psychological literature, including experimental psychology, clinical psychology, personality psychology, comparative psychology, etc., was combined, with no distinction being made among the various areas. The purpose of the present study was to identify what constitutes the most frequently used literature of pastoral care and counseling by surveying reading lists used at theological schools. Method
Article
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Article
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