Article

Review of Genealogy of Sex.

Authors:
To read the full-text of this research, you can request a copy directly from the author.

Abstract

Reviews the book, Genealogy of Sex by C. Thesing (1934). Thesing has written a much-needed and well-told outline of the evolution of sexuality. The reviewer has tested it with laymen, undergraduates, and scientists and found the verdict in each case very favorable although for different reasons in each case. The book is aptly termed a "genealogy" for it is in all truth just that. There are said to be two lines of sexual development: the separation of the male and the female, active and passive respectively, and the production of hermaphroditic organisms such as paramecium. The book deals with all forms from protozoa to man: asexual organisms, sexual species in which specialized reproductive cells have been developed, the hermaphrodite and intermediate sex groups, and finally the peak of evolution in the separation of male and female for specialized functions which makes possible the "emancipation of women" in some species. The 73 illustrations of which the 13 full pages of photographs are the best add materially to the book. It seems to the reviewer that the chief value of this book lies in its organization and very readable presentation of the vast amount of anthropological and zoological research that is piling up faster than it can be assimilated by any but specialists. Many questions are answered and any careful book that removes some of man's ignorance regarding the important sexual functions is indeed welcome. The general tone is high and the wide audience to which this book caters will profit by a careful reading. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2012 APA, all rights reserved)

No full-text available

Request Full-text Paper PDF

To read the full-text of this research,
you can request a copy directly from the author.

ResearchGate has not been able to resolve any citations for this publication.
ResearchGate has not been able to resolve any references for this publication.