Article

Treatment-Seeking, Aspects of Sexual Activity and Life Satisfaction in Men with Laser-Treated Penile Carcinoma

Department of Urology, Orebro University Hospital, Orebro, Sweden.
European Urology (Impact Factor: 13.94). 10/2008; 54(3):631-9. DOI: 10.1016/j.eururo.2007.10.028
Source: PubMed

ABSTRACT

The aims were to assess the initial symptoms of penile carcinoma and patients' time frame in treatment seeking, and to describe the effect of laser treatment on sexual activity and life satisfaction.
A retrospective face-to-face structured interview study of patients laser treated for localised penile carcinoma at the department of Urology in Orebro, Sweden, during 1986 to 2000. Sixty-seven was treated and 58 of them (mean age, 63 yr; range, 34-90) were alive at the time of this study. Forty-six (79%) agreed to participate.
Ninety-six percent of the patients recalled their first symptom of penile carcinoma. Superficial ulceration and fissures were the most common symptoms (39%). Thirty-seven percent delayed seeking treatment for more than 6 mo. The patients had a greater lifetime number of sexual partners and a greater lifetime prevalence of STIs than a Swedish representative comparator population. Some aspects of sexual life, such as manual stimulation/caressing and fellatio, decreased markedly after laser treatment. Patient satisfaction with life as a whole was approximately the same as that of the general population.
Patients delayed seeking treatment for a considerable period, despite awareness of the first local symptoms. Men with laser-treated localised penile carcinoma resume their sexual activities to a large extent after the treatment. Except for satisfaction with somatic health, similar-or even higher-proportions of patients than comparators are satisfied with life as a whole and with other domains of life including satisfaction with sexual life.

Download full-text

Full-text

Available from: Kerstin Fugl-Meyer, Apr 24, 2015
  • Source
    • "The clinical coordinator telephones the patient personally and coordinates appointments, ideally, all on one day. This coordinator may also serve the important function of relieving anxiety and stress before the first appointment and supporting the patient's own coping strategy [11] [19] [20]. The operating theatre capacity was unchanged during the study period, as reflected in the unchanged treatment interval (Table 4). "
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: The aim of this study was to examine the feasibility and impact of a fast-track referral pathway on clinical time intervals in penile cancer. This observational study from a tertiary referral centre included 263 patients diagnosed before and after the introduction of an intervention to reduce clinical time intervals, the Cancer Patient Pathway (CPP). The CPP included fast-track referral and set time-frames for units participating in cancer diagnosis and treatment, and was introduced for penile cancer in Denmark on 1 January 2009. Median time intervals (in calendar days) with interquartile range were the main outcome measure. A trend towards reduction was observed in all clinical time intervals, with a statistically significant reduction in the system interval (p = 0.01) and tertiary centre interval (p < 0.0001). The proportion of patients treated within the maximum accepted time-frame of 37 days after referral steadily increased after implementation of the CPP. In particular, unjustified waiting time was reduced significantly. This was mainly achieved through pre-booking of appointments and diagnostic time slots by a dedicated clinical coordinator. To the authors' knowledge, this is the first study examining the feasibility and impact of an intervention to reduce clinical time intervals in penile cancer. The Danish CPP was successful in reducing system and tertiary centre intervals. Future interventions need to address the long patient interval. Longer follow-up is needed to study the impact of CPP on mortality.
    Full-text · Article · Aug 2015 · Scandinavian Journal of Urology
  • Source
    • "[4] "
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: The aims were to assess the initial symptoms of penile carcinoma and patients' time frame in treatment seeking, and to describe the effect of laser treatment on sexual activity and life satisfaction. A retrospective face-to-face structured interview study of patients laser treated for localised penile carcinoma at the department of Urology in Orebro, Sweden, during 1986 to 2000. Sixty-seven was treated and 58 of them (mean age, 63 yr; range, 34-90) were alive at the time of this study. Forty-six (79%) agreed to participate. Ninety-six percent of the patients recalled their first symptom of penile carcinoma. Superficial ulceration and fissures were the most common symptoms (39%). Thirty-seven percent delayed seeking treatment for more than 6 mo. The patients had a greater lifetime number of sexual partners and a greater lifetime prevalence of STIs than a Swedish representative comparator population. Some aspects of sexual life, such as manual stimulation/caressing and fellatio, decreased markedly after laser treatment. Patient satisfaction with life as a whole was approximately the same as that of the general population. Patients delayed seeking treatment for a considerable period, despite awareness of the first local symptoms. Men with laser-treated localised penile carcinoma resume their sexual activities to a large extent after the treatment. Except for satisfaction with somatic health, similar-or even higher-proportions of patients than comparators are satisfied with life as a whole and with other domains of life including satisfaction with sexual life.
    Full-text · Article · Oct 2008 · European Urology

  • No preview · Article ·
Show more