American College Health Association National College Health Assessment Spring 2006 Reference Group Data Report (Abridged)

ArticleinJournal of American College Health 55(4):195-206 · January 1970with34 Reads
DOI: 10.3200/JACH.55.4.195-206
Abstract
Objective: Assessing and understanding the health needs and capacities of college students is paramount to creating healthy campus communities. The American College Health Association--National College Health Assessment (ACHA-NCHA) is a survey developed by the ACHA in 1998 to assist institutions of higher education in achieving this goal. The ACHA-NCHA contains approximately 300 questions assessing student health status and health problems, risk and protective behaviors, and impediments to academic performance. Participants: The Spring 2006 Reference Group includes ACHA-NCHA data from 94,806 students at 117 institutions of higher education. Method Summary: Officials at participating institutions administered the ACHA-NCHA to all students, to randomly selected students, or to students in randomly selected classrooms. Data were collected between January and May 2006. Results: Results from the Spring 2006 Reference Group (N = 94,806) are presented. Conclusions: Data from the ACHA-NCHA Spring 2006 Reference Group expand the understanding of the health needs and capacities of college students. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2012 APA, all rights reserved)
    • "To assess for sexual assault, we used 4 individual selfreport questions from the National College Health Assessment scale (Hoban 2007). The items assessed for various dimensions of sexual assault, namely, verbal threat (''Within the last school year, have you experienced verbal threats for sex against your will?''), unwanted sexual touching (''Within the last school year, have you experienced sexual touching against your will?''), attempted sexual penetration (''Within the last school year, have you experienced attempted penetration against your will?''), and completed sexual penetration (''Within the last school year, have you experienced sexual penetration against your will?''). "
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract] ABSTRACT: The present study sought to examine how social problem solving and sexual assault are involved in suicidal risk in a sample of 221 female college students. Specifically, we were interested to examine whether sexual assault may play an additive as well as interactive role in the prediction of suicidal risk (viz., hopelessness & suicidal behaviors) above and beyond social problem solving. Results from regression analyses indicated that deficits in social problem solving, especially low positive problem orientation, and sexual assault were important and unique predictors of suicidal risk in female students. Moreover, we found support for a Social Problem Solving × Sexual Assault interaction in predicting hopelessness. Significant interactions emerged specifically for negative problem orientation and impulsivity/carelessness style. Some important implications of the present findings are discussed.
    Full-text · Article · Dec 2014
    • "To assess for sexual assault, we used 4 individual self-report questions from the National College Health Assessment scale (NCHA; Hoban, 2007). The items assessed for various dimensions of sexual assault, namely, verbal threat (Within the last school year, have you experienced verbal threats for sex against your will?), unwanted sexual touching (Within the last school year, have you experienced sexual touching against your will?), attempted sexual penetration (Within the last school year, have you experienced attempted penetration against your will?), and completed sexual penetration (Within the last school year, have you experienced sexual penetration against your will?). "
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract] ABSTRACT: The present study sought to examine for how hope and sexual assault are involved in suicidal risk in a sample of 325 college students. Specifically, we were interested to examine whether sexual assault may play an additive as well as interactive role in the prediction of suicidal risk (viz., suicidal behaviors & reasons for living) above and beyond hope. Results from regression analyses indicated that hope and sexual assault were important and unique predictors of suicidal risk in students. Moreover, we found some support for a Hope × Sexual Assault interaction in predicting both suicidal behaviors and reasons for living. However, only the findings for suicidal behaviors remained after controlling for concurrent depressive symptomatology. Some important implications of the present findings are discussed.
    Full-text · Article · Oct 2014
    • "With regards to drug abuse, the prevalence rates of substance use behaviors have been well documented among undergraduate students [57-60]. In regards to drug and substance use, the current research shows that smoking (OR 1.40 95% CI: 1.00 - 1.89) and drug addiction show an increased risk of manifestating clinically significant depressive symptoms (up to 5.45 times experiencing symptoms of depression for drug users, OR 5.44 95% CI: 2.95 -8.84). "
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract] ABSTRACT: Background Previous findings in the literature suggest that the occurrence of depressive symptoms among university students is associated with specific socio-demographic characteristics. No related research studies have been conducted among university students in Cyprus. The current study aims to add more evidence to the literature by estimating the prevalence of clinical depressive symptoms and their association with individual, parental, academic and health-related behavior characteristics. Methods A descriptive cross sectional study with internal comparison was performed. The occurrence of depressive symptoms was assessed by the Center for Epidemiology Studies - Depression Scale (CES-D). Clinical depressive symptoms were reported as CES-D values ≥ 20. The socio-demographic and other characteristics of the participants were assessed using a questionnaire specifically designed for the present study. Both questionnaires were completed anonymously and voluntarily by 1,500 students (29.9% males and 70.1% females, response rate 85%). Results The prevalence of clinical depressive symptoms [CES-D score ≥ 20] was 27.9%. Among other, strong positive associations with clinical depressive symptoms were observed with a) positive personal and family history of depression (OR 2.85, 95% CI: 1.77 – 4.60), b) self -assessed poor physical and mental health (OR 11.30, 95% CI: 7.05 – 18.08). Moreover, students with learning disabilities, as well as those who were dissatisfied with the major under study, the quality of the educational system, the living arrangement, their social life and the available university facilities (OR 2.73, 95% CI: 2.00 – 3.72) were more likely to report clinical depressive symptoms. Conclusions The results of the present study highlight specific individual, parental, academic and health-related behavior characteristics of the students associated with the presence of depressive symptoms. Thus, targeted interventions considering the socio-demographic profile of vulnerable students for early recognition and manifestation of mental health disturbances may be designed. Moreover, the relatively high prevalence of clinical symptoms of depression within this particular cultural context may warrant further investigation in longitudinal studies.
    Full-text · Article · Aug 2014
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