Article

Hypnotic susceptibility and depth: Predictors of outcome in a weight control therapy.

Authors:
To read the full-text of this research, you can request a copy directly from the authors.

Abstract

Investigated depth of trance and the components of susceptibility (the Harvard Group Scale of Hypnotic Susceptibility—Form A) as outcome variables in 47 female patients in a weight-reduction program involving hypnosis and in 46 program dropouts. Significant reductions were found in measures of anthropometry following treatment. A significant depth of trance effect was found between patients and dropouts and significantly more weight was lost by high- than low-susceptible Ss. Significant correlations were found between weight loss and general ideomotor and challenge susceptibility. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2012 APA, all rights reserved)

No full-text available

Request Full-text Paper PDF

To read the full-text of this research,
you can request a copy directly from the authors.

... Hypnotizability was not a significant predictor of weight loss or other outcomes in our patients, which is in line with some studies and a recent meta-analysis (7,38,39) but unlike others showing a significant relationship between hypnotic susceptibility and weight-loss outcomes (10,40,41). ...
Article
Objective The usefulness of the rapid‐induction techniques of hypnosis as an adjunctive weight‐loss treatment has not been defined. This randomized controlled trial evaluated whether self‐conditioning techniques (self‐hypnosis) added to lifestyle interventions contributed to weight loss (primary outcome), changes in metabolic and inflammatory variables, and quality of life (QoL) improvement (secondary outcomes) in severe obesity. Methods Individuals (with BMI = 35‐50 kg/m²) without organic or psychiatric comorbidity were randomly assigned to the intervention (n = 60) or control arm (n = 60). All received exercise and behavioral recommendations and individualized diets. The intervention consisted of three hypnosis sessions, during which self‐hypnosis was taught to increase self‐control before eating. Diet, exercise, satiety, QoL, anthropometric measurements, and blood variables were collected and measured at enrollment and at 1 year (trial end). Results A similar weight loss was observed in the intervention (−6.5 kg) and control (−5.6 kg) arms (β = −0.45; 95% CI: −3.78 to 2.88; P = 0.79). However, habitual hypnosis users lost more weight (−9.6 kg; β = −10.2; 95% CI: −14.2 to −6.18; P < 0.001) and greatly reduced their caloric intake (−682.5 kcal; β = −643.6; 95% CI: −1064.0 to −223.2; P = 0.005) in linear regression models. At trial end, the intervention arm showed lower C‐reactive protein values (β = −2.55; 95% CI: −3.80 to −1.31; P < 0.001), higher satiety (β = 19.2; 95% CI: 7.71‐30.6; P = 0.001), and better QoL (β = 0.09; 95% CI: 0.02‐0.16; P = 0.01). Conclusions Self‐hypnosis was not associated with differences in weight change but was associated with improved satiety, QoL, and inflammation. Indeed, habitual hypnosis users showed a greater weight loss.
... Exceptions to this were Bolocovsky et al (1985) and Stradling et al (1998) who were able to demonstrate maintained weight loss benefits in their hypnosis cohorts at 24 and 18 months respectively. Rarely was any formal, or informal, assessment of hypnotisability employed prior to commencing therapy, but where this was measured, there appeared to be a correlation between such measurements and subsequent weight loss (Stanton, 1975;Andersen, 1985;Jupp et al, 1986;Barabasz & Spiegel, 1989;Mewes et al, 2003), an exception to this being that of Deyoub (1979) who found little correlation between weight loss and the Harvard Scale assessment. Irrespective of the parameters used to assess the resulting success of hypnotherapy sessions, or the length of follow-up posthypnosis or post-weight-loss, 33 out of 43 (77%) of the papers referenced in table 1 deemed hypnosis to have been efficacious in enhancing weight loss in their obese patients. ...
Article
Full-text available
Abstract Hypnosis has long been recognized as an effective tool for producing behavioral change in the eating disorders anorexia and bulimia. Despite many studies from the latter half of the last century suggesting that hypnosis might also be of value in managing obesity situations, the efficacy of hypnotherapy for weight reduction has received surprisingly little formal research attention since 2000. This review presents a brief history of early clinical studies using hypnosis for weight reduction and describes a hypnotherapeutic approach within which a combination of instructional/pedagogic and exploratory therapeutic sessions can work together synergistically to maximize the potential for sustained weight loss. Hypnotic modulation of appetite- and satiation-associated peptides and hormone levels may yield additional physiological benefits in Type 1 and Type 2 diabetes.
Chapter
Hypnose wurde seit alters her als ein Verfahren und als ein daraus resultierender Zustand veränderten Bewusstseins (Trance) beschrieben, in dem die Menschen (bisweilen auch Tiere) anders als gewöhnlich reagieren. Die Folklore schreibt diesem Zustand Willenlosigkeit, verbesserte kognitive Fähigkeiten (z. B. Erinnerungsvermögen), ungewöhnliche körperliche Leistungen (z. B. kataleptische Brücke), Schmerzlosigkeit und bestimmte psychosomatische Phänomene (z. B. suggerierte Brandblasen) zu. Hypnose hat eine gespaltene Tradition: eine mystische und eine medizinische. Sie lebt einerseits in magischen Formen der Geistheilung, des spirituellen Wachstums weiter und hat etwa die Theosophische Gesellschaft oder Christian Science in ihren Riten beeinflusst. Andererseits hat sie eine Vielzahl wissenschaftlicher Untersuchungen im klinischen und im experimentellen Bereich hervorgebracht und ist als therapeutische Methode bei unterschiedlichsten somatischen und psychischen Störungen wissenschaftlich anerkannt und erfolgreich eingesetzt worden. Fragen, die sich mit dem Thema Hypnose verbinden, sind u. a.: Hat der Mensch in diesem Zustand besondere physische oder mentale Fähigkeiten? Kann man gegen seinen Willen hypnotisiert werden? Ist jeder hypnotisierbar? Sind Erinnerungen unter Hypnose verlässlich? Wegen der Publikumswirksamkeit einiger dieser Fragen wird Hypnose oft als Schaustellung verunglimpft. In der Hauptsache ist sie jedoch eine vielseitige und effektive Therapiemethode.
Chapter
Full-text available
Hypnose wurde seit alters her als ein Verfahren und ein daraus resultierender Zustand veränderten Bewusstseins (Trance) beschrieben, in dem der Mensch (bisweilen auch Tiere) anders als gewöhnlich reagieren. Die Folklore schreibt diesem Zustand Willenlosigkeit, verbesserte kognitive Fähigkeiten (z. B. Erinnerungsvermögen), ungewöhnliche körperliche Leistungen (z. B. kataleptische Brücke), Schmerzlosigkeit und bestimmte psychosomatische Phänomene (z. B. suggerierte Brandblasen) zu. Hypnose hat eine gespaltene Tradition: eine mystische und medizinische. Sie lebt einerseits in magischen Formen der Geistheilung, des spirituellen Wachstums weiter und hat etwa die Theosophische Gesellschaft oder Christian Science in ihren Riten beeinflusst. Andererseits hat sie eine Vielzahl wissenschaftlicher Untersuchungen im klinischen und im experimentellen Bereich hervorgebracht und ist als therapeutische Methode bei unterschiedlichsten somatischen und psychischen Störungen wissenschaftlich anerkannt und erfolgreich eingesetzt worden. Fragen, die sich mit dem Thema Hypnose verbinden, sind u. a.: Hat der Mensch in diesem Zustand besondere physische oder mentale Fähigkeiten?
Article
Full-text available
The literature suggests that aspects of hypnotizability may be involved in the etiology and maintenance of self-defeating eating. However, interpretation of the published research findings has been complicated by the use of instruments that appear to have measured different or, at best, only related facets of the underlying constructs. This article reports relationships between weight, shape, dietary concerns, hypnotizability, dissociative capacity, and fantasy proneness. Implications for a key role for hypnosis in the treatment of eating behaviors, attitudes, and concerns are discussed.
ResearchGate has not been able to resolve any references for this publication.