Article

Loss of libido due to stress

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Abstract

Discusses loss of sexual desire (SD) due to stress. Anxiety, anger, depression, and guilt are crucial in the loss of SD. Concern about self-image and body-image can reduce SD; this can occur after an individual undergoes a hysterectomy, when stress responses cause a deterioration in sexual functioning. Cultural changes, such as the increased sexual freedom of women, can threaten men and result in a lowered SD. Organic stressors, including prescription and over-the-counter drugs, can also reduce SD. The loss of SD is difficult to treat, but can be addressed in counseling; usually, establishing open communication between partners is an important 1st step. Sensate focus exercises can be suggested to aid partners in the restoration of SD. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2012 APA, all rights reserved)

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... Surgery serves as an effective threat of body damage (Kanto, 1996) and fear of body damage is known to cause exaggerated inappropriate reactions and reactivated castration fears (Janis, 1974, p. 109) particularly in vulnerable persons. Genital surgery, more than other types of surgery, is known to elicit psychological stress in the form of altered mood state, anxiety, irritation, impaired sexuality and somatic symptoms (Arnett et al., 1986;Dias, 1983;Lalinec-Michaud & Engelsmann, 1985). Particularly in vulnerable personalities pronounced psychological, sexual or somatic distress post surgery, when compared to nonvulnerable individuals, may come to light (O'Hara et al., 1989). ...
... Questionnaires. Genital surgery is known to elicit responses in the form of altered mood state, anxiety, irritation, impaired sexuality and somatic symptoms (Arnett et al., 1986;Dias, 1983;Lalinec-Michaud & Engelsmann, 1985) particularly in vulnerable personalities (O'Hara et al., 1989). The choice of the questionnaires was based on these facts and on their known fitness for use in Turku. ...
... Thus, altogether the questionnaires were aimed at assessing psychological, sexual and somatic variables (e.g. Arnett et al., 1986;Gath, 1987;Janis, 1974;Lalinec-Michaud & Engelsmann, 1985) and were previously ethically approved for a pilot study about the effects of gynaecological surgery. The timing for administering the questionnaires was in agreement with earlier research (e.g. ...
... Surgery serves as an effective threat of body damage (Kanto, 1996) and fear of body damage is known to cause exaggerated inappropriate reactions and reactivated castration fears (Janis, 1974, p. 109) particularly in vulnerable persons. Genital surgery, more than other types of surgery, is known to elicit psychological stress in the form of altered mood state, anxiety, irritation, impaired sexuality and somatic symptoms (Arnett et al., 1986;Dias, 1983;Lalinec-Michaud & Engelsmann, 1985). Particularly in vulnerable personalities pronounced psychological, sexual or somatic distress post surgery, when compared to nonvulnerable individuals, may come to light (O'Hara et al., 1989). ...
... Questionnaires. Genital surgery is known to elicit responses in the form of altered mood state, anxiety, irritation, impaired sexuality and somatic symptoms (Arnett et al., 1986;Dias, 1983;Lalinec-Michaud & Engelsmann, 1985) particularly in vulnerable personalities (O'Hara et al., 1989). The choice of the questionnaires was based on these facts and on their known fitness for use in Turku. ...
... Thus, altogether the questionnaires were aimed at assessing psychological, sexual and somatic variables (e.g. Arnett et al., 1986;Gath, 1987;Janis, 1974;Lalinec-Michaud & Engelsmann, 1985) and were previously ethically approved for a pilot study about the effects of gynaecological surgery. The timing for administering the questionnaires was in agreement with earlier research (e.g. ...
... La confiance dans ses capacités sexuelles pour commencer et maintenir des rapports intimes satisfaisants est affectée par les croyances qu'a le sujet sur ses propres caractéristiques personnelles et sur ce que désire le partenaire (Donaghue, 2009). Le rôle de la perception négative du schéma corporel sur la sexualité et le désir a été mentionné plusieurs auteurs (Arnett et al., 1986 ;Trudel, 2003). Une autre étude a examiné les relations entre les différentes variables concernant l'image du corps et la réponse sexuelle. ...
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Altogether 112 Finnish males (aged 25 - 67 years) participated in the present research. Of these, 35 underwent conventional and 77 no-scalpel [NS] vasectomy. All were assessed immediately before and 1 year after the vasectomy, by means of Beck's Depression Inventory [BDI], Taylor's Anxiety Scale [TAS], the Buss-Durkee Hostility Inventory [BDHI], and Measurement of Masculinity-Femininity [MF]. In addition, changes in angst, sexuality and somatic symptoms were rated by means of Likert scales. The men were divided on the basis of these assessments, into two groups: a psychologically vulnerable vs. a non-vulnerable group. Post surgery, the latter males experienced a greater satisfaction in regards to psychological, sexual and somatic well being as well as in their masculine self-esteem. During the experimental period scrotal discomfort was reflected in a negative change towards vasectomy. Back pain was unrelated to vasectomy technique, but correlated to the immediateness of post-vasectomy coitus. A 10-day post-vasectomy abstinence was recommended.
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Describes a treatment program for males suffering from hypoactive sexual desire disorder. Treatment focused on developing the emotional aspects of the client, on increasing his sexual repertoire, and on improving his attitude and response to these sexual experiences in the context of each client's relationship. These aims were addressed by the use of communication exercises, sensate focus exercises, and guided fantasies. 15 men and their partners were so treated. While there was a decrease in the level of performance anxiety and sexual anxiety, Ss still experienced difficulty in level of sexual interest and in initiating sexual activity. At the 3- and 6-mo follow-up, the level of communication, sexual satisfaction, sexual arousal, and satisfaction with the relationship was still high. A case study is included. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2012 APA, all rights reserved)
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