Article

Adult trigger finger

Hand and Extremity Reconstruction Service, Department of Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery, Imperial College Healthcare NHS Trust, London W6 8RF, UK.
BMJ (online) (Impact Factor: 17.45). 10/2012; 345(oct12 2):e5743. DOI: 10.1136/bmj.e5743
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Available from: Abhilash Jain, Nov 06, 2015
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