Article

Effect of Aromatherapy Massage on Elderly Patients Under Long-Term Hospitalization in Japan

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Abstract

Objectives: To verify the effectiveness of aromatherapy massage on elderly patients under long-term hospitalization. Design: Aromatherapy massage was performed twice a week for a total of eight times. Setting: Nursing home. Subjects: Elderly women under long-term hospitalization. Interventions: Questionnaire and measurement of stress marker levels (salivary amylase activity) before and after the first, fifth, and eighth aromatherapy massages. Outcome measures: Questionnaire (Face scale, General Health Questionnaire-12 [GHQ-12]), measurement of salivary amylase activity. Results: A decrease in stress after aromatherapy massage compared to before each massage was confirmed at all measurement times and with the stress marker. No marked reduction was observed in Face scale or saliva amylase activity as a whole over the long term, although decreasing tendencies were seen. Marked reductions in GHQ-12 were observed over the long term. Conclusions: Aroma massage appears likely to prove effective in reducing psychological stress among elderly patients under long-term hospitalization.

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... The literature reports that lavender oil and rosemary oil have strong analgesic effects (Cavanagh, 2005;Dhany et al., 2012). However, aroma massage appears to prove effective in reducing psychological stress (Satou et al., 2013). In this study; the reason why mean VAS scores decreased among the patients of the control group may have resulted from the decreased blood urea thanks to hemodialysis and elimination of toxic effect of urea upon the brain. ...
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This eighth edition of Dr Reichel's formative text remains the go-to guide for practicing physicians and allied health staff confronted with the unique problems of an increasing elderly population. Fully updated and revised, it provides a practical guide for all health specialists, emphasizing the clinical management of the elderly patient with simple to complex problems. Featuring four new chapters and the incorporation of geriatric emergency medicine into chapters. The book begins with a general approach to the management of older adults, followed by a review of common geriatric syndromes, and proceeding to an organ-based review of care. The final section addresses principles of care, including care in special situations, psychosocial aspects of our aging society, and organization of care. Particular emphasis is placed on cost-effective, patient-centered care, including a discussion of the Choosing Wisely campaign. A must-read for all practitioners seeking practical and relevant information in a comprehensive format.
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