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The Effect of Six Weeks of Squat, Plyometric and Squat-Plyometric Training on Power Production

Authors:
  • Southern Cross University, Gold Coast, Australia

Abstract

Explosive leg power is a key ingredient to maximizing vertical jump performance. In training, the athlete must use the most effective program to optimize leg power development. The purpose of this study was to compare the effectiveness of three training programs - squat (S), plyometric (P) and squat-plyometric (SP) - in increasing hip and thigh power production as measured by vertical jump. Forty-eight subjects were divided equally into four groups: S, P, SP or control (C). The subjects trained two days a week for a total of seven weeks, which consisted of a one-week technique learning period followed by a six- week periodized S, P or SP training program. Hip and thigh power were tested before and after training using the vertical jump test, and the alpha level was set at 0.05. Statistical analysis of the data revealed a significant increase in hip and thigh power production, as measured by vertical jump, within all three treatment groups. The SP group achieved a statistically greater improvement (p < 0.0001) than the S or P groups alone. Examination of the mean scores shows that the S group increased 3.30 centimeters in vertical jump, the P group increased 3.81 centimeters and the SP group increased 10.67 centimeters. The results indicate that both S and P training are necessary for improving hip and thigh power production as measured by vertical jumping ability. (C) 1992 National Strength and Conditioning Association
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... Even though a wide variety of training modalities for the vertical jump have been studied in the literature, including electromyostimulation [52], vibrations [19], plyometric training (PT) [1], and weight training (WT) [74], only the last two achieved consistent and reliable results [62]. Weight training, which is used to increase the maximal muscle force, improved jump performance between 2% and 25% depending on the study setup and the subject's proficiency [62]. ...
Conference Paper
In many athletic activities, jumping is a fundamental skill requiring strength, stability, and coordination. It is also a good indicator for general fitness and can predict the individual risk of injury. There- fore, most people profit from training to improve their jumping performance. However, amateur athletes might not have access to professional analysis equipment or jump trainers, and unsupervised training, such as online videos, cannot provide individual feedback. Therefore, we explore the potential of using virtual reality as a widely available platform for a personalized jump training applica- tion. Based on the current state of research, we discuss and identify possible use cases, such as instant replays of recorded jumps, an in- dividual motion analysis, automatic exercise recommendations, and gamified workouts. We also demonstrate the feasibility of jumping interaction in virtual scenarios with an early prototype and explain future research directions.
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... It is a training technique (Baechle, 1994). Completed studies have shown that plyometric exercises have a positive effect on improvement in vertical jump performance, speed, leg muscle strength, muscle strength, joint sensitivity and body reaction when working with periodic strength training (Adams et al., 1992). ...
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... Furthermore, a common trend in the training programs indicates that a combination of methods is most effective in improving performance than standalone approaches (Adams et al., 1992). Indeed, previous recent studies have reported improvement in athletic performance after combined plyometric and short sprint training in soccer players (Sáez de Villarreal et al., 2015;Hammami et al., 2020;Kargarfard et al., 2020). ...
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