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Does Cordyceps sinensis Ingestion Aid Athletic Performance?

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Does Cordyceps sinensis Ingestion Aid Athletic Performance?

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summary: Cordyceps sinensis is a potentially ergogenic herb that gained popularity after the Chinese women's team credited it for their world-record performances at the 1993 World Track and Field Championships. Since then, a few peer-reviewed investigations have been published, but results of these investigations have been equivocal, with two human studies claiming an ergogenic effect and three human studies failing to find an effect. At this time, it is premature to conclude that Cordyceps sinensis does or does not possess ergogenic properties. (C) 2006 National Strength and Conditioning Association

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... Vienuose darbuose (Smith, 2001; Earnest et al., 2004) rašoma apie šio grybo teigiamą įtaką dviratininkų ištvermės ugdymui, kituose (Parcell et al., 2004) teigiama, kad kordicepsas nėra labai reikšmingas treniruotų dviratininkų VO 2 max ir anaerobinės apykaitos slenksčio lygiui. Galima išskirti Walker (2006) darbą, kuriame analizuojami kordicepso įtaką tyrinėjusių kitų autorių duomenys, tarp jų ir duomenys apie moterų, vartojusių šio grybo preparatus , vidutinių ir ilgų nuotolių bėgimo rezultatų gerėjimą. Mokslininkai su kordicepso vartojimu taip pat susiejo Kinijos bėgikių, gerinusių pasaulio ilgųjų nuotolių bėgimo rekordus, laimėjimus (Steinkraus, Whitfield, 1994), pastebėjo teigiamą kininio grybo Cordyceps sinensis įtaką riebalų metabolizmui ilgai trunkančio fizinio krūvio metu (Nicodemus et al., 2001), tyrinėjo trumpai trunkančio grybo Cordyceps sinensis vartojimo įtaką profesionalių dviratininkų fiziniam darbingumui (Buchnan et al., 2001), kinų mokslininkai (Yong-Lu et al., 1997 ) nurodė galimybę panaudoti kininį grybą Cordyceps sinensis sportininkų ištvermei ir reakcijos greičiui ugdyti. ...
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This study was conducted to investigate the chemical component of the hot water (HW) fraction of mycelia of Cordyceps sinensis and its antifatigue and antistress effect against a stimulus in vivo using rats and mice. The growth of mycelia reached a maximum level of 31.6 g/l after 120 h of incubation. The main chemical composition of the HW fraction of mycelia of C. sinensis was found to be carbohydrate (78.9%) with 5% moisture. The swimming endurance capacity of mice orally administered with the HW fraction (150 and 300 mg/kg/d, respectively) was significantly prolonged from 75 to 90 min with a lessening of fatigue. When the HW fraction (150 mg/kg/d) was given to rats for 8 d including a 48 h stress period, the weight changes of the adrenal gland, spleen, thymus, and thyroid, which is an index of stress, were suppressed. The HW fraction also significantly inhibited the increase in total cholesterol and the decrease in alkaline phosphatase levels as biochemical parameters of immobilization stress in rats.
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We examined the effects of a commercially marketed herbal-based formula purported to increase endurance on oxygen consumption (VO2) in 17 competitive category III/IV amateur cyclists [mean (SEM) age: 31.1 (1.8) yr; height: 178.5 (1.8) cm; weight: 77.1 (1.6) kg]. Each cyclist participated in two (pre/post) cycling tests progressing 25 W.4 min(-1) starting at 100 W administered in a randomized, placebo-controlled, double-blind fashion. The second trial was performed 14 d after the ingestion of a manufacturer recommended loading phase (4 d x 6 caps.d(-1)) and a maintenance phase (11 d x 3 caps.d(-1)). Three treatment capsules contained 1000 mg of Cordyceps sinensis (CS-4) and 300 mg Rhodiola rosea root extract as the primary ingredients; 800 mg of other ingredients included calcium pyruvate, sodium phosphate, potassium phosphate, ribose, and adenosine and 200 mcg of chromium. Using a 2 x 2 ANOVA, we observed no significant treatment effect for any between or within group variables including peak VO2 [treatment 4.14 (0.2) L.min(-1); placebo 4.10 (0.2) L.min(-1)], time to exhaustion [treatment 38.47 (1.7) min; placebo 36.95 (1.8) min], peak power output (PO) [treatment 300.00 (12.1) W; placebo 290.63 (12.9) W], or peak heart rate. We also observed no differences for any subpeak exercise variable including the PO eliciting 2 mmol.L(-1) blood lactate (BLa) [treatment 201.00 (18.1) W; placebo 167.50 (19.2) W] and 4 mmol.L(-1) BLa [treatment 235.88 (15.8) W; placebo 244.78 (14.9) W], ventilatory threshold, respiratory compensation point, or Vo2 L.min(-1) gross efficiency at each stage. A 2-wk ingestion schema of a commercial herbal-based formula is insufficient to elicit positive changes in cycling performance.
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Cordyceps sinensis (Cs) and Rhodiola rosea (Rr) are herbs used in traditional Chinese medicine to treat a multitude of ailments as well as to enhance performance. The purpose of this research was to examine the effects of a formula containing Cs and Rr (Cs-Rr) on circulatory dynamics, specifically muscle tissue oxygen saturation (Sto(2)), in male subjects during maximal exercise. This study followed a double blind, randomized, placebo-treatment, pre-post test design. Capsules were administered to 8 subjects who were randomly assigned to 1 of 2 groups. The treatment group received Cs-Rr, and the control group received a placebo. All subjects performed 2 exercise stress tests to volitional fatigue on a cycle load ergometer. There were no significant (p </= 0.05) differences in Sto(2) slope, Sto(2) threshold (Sto(2T)), Vo(2)max, ventilatory threshold (V(T)), or time to exhaustion (T(E)) between or within the treatment or control group. In conclusion, Cs-Rr did not significantly enhance Sto(2).
Cs-4 improves steady state bioenergy status in mouse liver
  • G Dai
  • T Bao
  • C Xu
  • Cordy-Max
DAI, G., T. BAO, AND C. XU. Cordy-Max Cs-4 improves steady state bioenergy status in mouse liver. J. Altern. Complement. Med. 7:231-240. 2001.
CordyMax Cs-4) supplementation does not improve endurance exercise performance
FELLINGHAM. Cordyceps sinensis (CordyMax Cs-4) supplementation does not improve endurance exercise performance. Int. J. Sport Nutr. Exerc. Metab. 14(2):236-242. 2004.
Walker is a doctoral student in exercise physiology at the University of New Mexico
  • B Thomas
Thomas B.Walker is a doctoral student in exercise physiology at the University of New Mexico.