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Abstract

Seven species of the amphipod genus Ericthonius are described and figured from the North-east Atlantic and associated seas and a key to their identification is provided. West Atlantic material is also considered where relevant to the taxonomy of East Atlantic species. Two species are re-established after a long period of submersion in synonymy, and one species new to science is described. The previous confusion in the literature of some of the species is discussed, and a synonymy of species described in key works is provided.
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... Once in the lab, the amphipods were transferred to a solution of glycerin and 70% alcohol for whitening previous to dissection. The genera and species were identified following Barnard (1969), Bousfield (1973), Myers (1982), Myers and McGrath (1984), Ledoyer (1986), Conlan (1990), Barnard and Karaman (1991), Thomas (1993a), LeCroy (2000, 2004, 2007, Myers and Lowry (2003), Appadoo and Myers (2004), and Serejo (2004). The assignment of genera to families follows Bousfield (1973), Martin and Díaz (2003), and LeCroy (2002,2004,2007). ...
... Once in the lab, the amphipods were transferred to a solution of glycerin and 70% alcohol for whitening previous to dissection. The genera and species were identified following Barnard (1969), Bousfield (1973), Myers (1982), Myers and McGrath (1984), Ledoyer (1986), Conlan (1990), Barnard and Karaman (1991), Thomas (1993a), LeCroy (2000, 2004, 2007, Myers and Lowry (2003), Appadoo and Myers (2004), and Serejo (2004). The assignment of genera to families follows Bousfield (1973), Martin and Díaz (2003), and LeCroy (2002,2004,2007). ...
... Monocorophium acherusicum and E. brasiliensis are fouling tube dwelling species that live on seagrass (Fox and Bynum, 1975), macroalgae, sponges, tunicates, hydroids, mussels, mud, and rubble, in estuaries, bays, and intertidal brackish waters (Myers, 1982;Appadoo and Myers, 2004;LeCroy, 2004LeCroy, , 2007Barba and Sánchez, 2005). ...
... The genus Ericthonius has a complicated taxonomic history, principally due to the lack of clear interspecific differences in females, and to intraspecific variability of male gnathopod 2 according to growth stage. As a result, Ericthonius species have undergone a series of erroneous synonymizations and consequent mis-identifications (Myers & McGrath, 1984;Chapman, 2007;Beermann & Franke, 2011;Krapp-Schickel, 2013;Marchini & Cardeccia, 2017). Some species within this genus, namely E. brasiliensis (Dana, 1853), E. difformis H. Milne Edwards, 1830, E. pugnax (Dana, 1852), E. punctatus (Spence Bate, 1857) and E. rubricornis (Stimpson, 1853), have been reported to have a very wide geographic distribution. ...
... Due to the complexity and the similarities between the species, the genus Ericthonius has been widely revisited (Myers, 1982;Myers & McGrath, 1984;Lowry & Berents, 1996). Many misidentifications have occurred, and some disagreement exists between authors on the validity of some species. ...
... In their revision of North-east Atlantic Ericthonius species, Myers & McGrath (1984) divided males in two groups (females are difficult to determine): Group 1 with male gnathopod 2 coxa with stridulating ridges, carpus posterodistal margin with 2 teeth in adults, but some species may have one tooth only in hyper-adults, coxa 2 widely separate from coxae 1 and 3; Group 2 with male gnathopod 2 coxa never with stridulating ridges, carpus posterodistal margin always with single tooth, coxa 2 more or less contiguous with coxae 1 and 3. Among European Ericthonius species, five of them belong to Moore, 1988). ...
Article
The amphipod Ericthonius didymus Krapp-Schickel, 2013 is reported for the first time outside its type locality in European waters, from the French Atlantic coast and from the Azores, Portugal. In particular, a large population was recorded in Arcachon, France. Molecular analyses were made to confirm the validity of three closely related Ericthonius species: E. didymus, E. convexus and E. pugnax. An identification key is provided, distinguishing Ericthonius species into three groups, based on the presence or absence of stridulating ridges on coxa 2 and posterodistal lobe on basis of male pereopod 5.
... ischyrocerid genus Ericthonius is characterized by hooked uniramous uropod 3, gnathopod 2 carpochelate in male and telson denticulate (Barnard and Karaman 1991). According to Myers and McGrath (1984) the new species described in this paper belongs to Group 1 of Ericthonius, based on gnathopod 2 coxal plate with stridulating ridges, which is separated from (not contiguous with) coxal plates 1 and 3, and a gnathopod 2 carpus with two posterodistal teeth. Males of Ericthonius camposi sp. ...
... Both genera inhabit mainly shallow water and continental shelf habitats. Only 10 species: Ericthonius megalops (Sars G.O., 1879), Ericthonius rubricornis (Stimpson, 1853), Ericthonius stephenseni Myers andMcGrath, 1984, Ericthonius tolli Bruggen, 1909 (Myers and McGrath 1984, Barnard and Karaman 1991, WoRMS 2015. ...
Article
Two new species of deep-sea amphipods of the genera Podocerus and Ericthonius are described and illustrated. They were collected on soft bottoms of the Bay of Campeche, SW Gulf of Mexico, at depths of 1400 to 2383 m. The two new species increase the numbers of Ericthonius species recorded to 22, the Podocerus species to 58, and the deep-sea amphipods from the Gulf of Mexico to 17 species. Ericthonius camposi sp. nov. is characterized by the cephalic lobes, gnathopod 1 basis; stridulating ridges on coxal plate of gnathopod 2 and epimera 2-3, and uropod 3 ramus. Males of Ericthonius camposi sp. nov., is most similar to males of Ericthonius brasiliensis (Dana, 1852), Ericthonius punctatus (Bate, 1857), and Ericthonius parabrasiliensis Just, 2009. Podocerus delacruzi sp. nov., is characterized by carinations on pereonites 2-4, pereonite 7 and pleonites 1-2 posterodorsally produced, uropod 2 peduncle, and telson. Males of Podocerus delacruzi sp. nov., are most similar to males of Podocerus kleidus Thomas and Barnard, 1992, Podocerus lazowasemi Baldinger and Gable, 1994, and Podocerus cristatus Thomson, 1879.
... Nevertheless, in the future, we expect to see an increase in the numbers of species reported in the three zones poorest in amphipods because new studies will cover the central part of the EC as well as two zones on the English side of the eastern EC. It is also likely that new records could be concerned with species recently described or reported in neighbouring zones, mainly along the French coast of the Bay of Biscay [93][94][95] and around the coasts of Ireland (see [29,33,34,37,41,42,45,53,63,64,66,68,69,71,75,[77][78][79]81,82]), i.e., approximately 20 species (Table 2). Particular attention to amphipod identification by engineers from consulting offices and researchers from university laboratories on amphipod collections from new studies should lead to the discovery of these potential species. ...
Article
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An updated checklist for 2022 of amphipods from the English Channel (La Manche) is given for eight geographical zones. This revision brings the inventory of 1999 up to date with recent data from the Normano-Breton Gulf and other studies focused on non-indigenous fauna, as well as recent data from benthic and suprabenthic studies, mainly in the eastern part of the English Channel (EC). The total number of species in the entire EC is 269. The number of species is much higher in the western basin (WEC) than it is in the eastern basin (EEC) or in the central part of the EC. The amphipod species listed here are distributed between the eight zones as follows: French WEC: 201 species; English WEC: 194; Normano-Breton Gulf: 224; Bay of Seine: 172; Wight: 97; French EEC: 149; English EEC: 64; and Central EC: 61. Of these species, 180 are present in both basins of the EC, while 78 are present only in the western basin and 11 are present only in the eastern basin. The low number of amphipods (<100) recorded in three of the eight zones is probably due to the lack of observations in these parts of the EC. Among the 269 amphipod species recorded with confidence in the EC, 24 are new to the EC since 1999, 12 are non-indigenous species, and 44 are observed only in one of the eight zones, mainly in the three zones of the western basin of the EC.
... This amphipod, as with C. riisei, is part of the fouling community which may explain its association with the octocoral and favouring its dispersion. Indeed, E. brasiliensis has a wide distribution in the Atlantic and Mediterranean (Myers and McGrath 1984) and is one of the most successful invaders around the world (Zettler 2021). In a study on the coast of California (USA), where this species is considered non-native (Cohen et al. 2005), E. brasiliensis was found to be abundant in the communities located on oil platforms but rare or absent in natural reefs (Page et al. 2007). ...
... This amphipod, as with C. riisei, is part of the fouling community which may explain its association with the octocoral and favouring its dispersion. Indeed, E. brasiliensis has a wide distribution in the Atlantic and Mediterranean (Myers and McGrath 1984) and is one of the most successful invaders around the world (Zettler 2021). In a study on the coast of California (USA), where this species is considered non-native (Cohen et al. 2005), E. brasiliensis was found to be abundant in the communities located on oil platforms but rare or absent in natural reefs (Page et al. 2007). ...
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Despite the obvious negative effects caused by invasive species, some recent studies have shown that the impacts at local scale are diverse and not necessarily negative. Arborescent benthic organisms such as octocorals form three-dimensional structures capable of increasing the amount of substrate available and providing shelter for epibiont species. We investigated the role of the alien octocoral Carijoa riisei on the diversity of benthic communities in three shipwrecks on the north-eastern coast of Brazil. We expected that (a) the fauna associated with the octocoral are richer and more diverse compared to the adjacent; (b) some species are exclusively associated with C. riisei; (c) the species that are present both in the areas with and without C. riisei have a greater abundance when associated with the octocoral. For this, we compared the macrobenthic communities associated with C. riisei to those found in adjacent areas where the octocoral was absent. Our study showed that the communities associated with the octocoral were 1.5 times richer and 10 times more abundant than adjacent communities, with 29 exclusive taxa. The dominant taxa were the amphipods Ericthonius brasiliensis and Podocerus brasiliensis and polychaetes of the family Syllidae. These taxa were present in areas with presence and absence of C. riisei, but their abundance was significantly greater where the octocoral was present. Our results reinforce the idea that Carijoa riisei acts as an ecosystem engineer in coastal reefs, creating new habitats and increasing diversity at a local scale, even though it is an alien species.
... Furthermore, Atlantic specimens revealed that the shape of gnathopod 2 carpus is function of the maturity and sexuality and the presence of a distinct subdistal tooth on male's carpus is probably a character to be taken with caution for identification. As it was also observed in others species, shape of some morphological male's characters depends of maturity degrees, as the number of gnathopod 2 carpus teeth in Ericthonius H. Milne Edwards, 1830 species (Myers & McGrath, 1984), or the size of gnathopod 2 propodus tooth in Jassa Leach, 1814 species (Gouillieux, 2017). Thus, to avoid identification errors, juveniles and subadults specimens should remain as Leucothoe indeterminate. ...
Article
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Specimens of Leucothoe were collected during specific surveys on the benthic fauna of the Arcachon Bay and Brittany. Original and subsequent descriptions, as well as comparison with specimens from type locality, confirm the identification of the Mediterranean species Leucothoe denticulata, a species morphologically close to the frequently recorded species L. spinicarpa. Setation of mandibular palp, gnathopod 1 propodus and gnathopod 2 basis is herein used to distinguished the two closely species. A description of the Atlantic L. denticulata specimens is provided with some ecological notes, as well as an actualized identification key to Leucothoe species from European waters. Résumé : Leucothoe denticulata Costa, 1851 (Crustacé : Amphipode : Leucothoidae) : une espèce méditerranéenne appartenant au complexe Leucothoe spinicarpa (Abildgaard, 1789) bien présente sur les côtes atlantiques françaises. Des spécimens de Leucothoe ont été récoltés lors d'études spécifiques de la faune benthique dans le bassin d'Arcachon et en Bretagne. La description originelle et les suivantes, ainsi que la comparaison avec des individus de la localité type, confirment l'identification de l'espèce méditerranéenne Leucothoe denticulata, une espèce morphologiquement proche de L. spinicarpa fréquemment recensée. Les soies du palpe mandibulaire, du propode du gnathopode 1 et du basis du gnathopode 2 sont utilisées ici pour distinguer les deux espèces proches. Une description des individus d'Atlantique est fournie avec quelques notes écologiques, ainsi qu'une clé d'identification actualisée des espèces de Leucothoe des eaux européennes.
... The arrangement of genera and families included in the 2 latter works were adopted since they provide more recent phylogenetic evidence of relationships within the corophiidan and talitridan amphipods. The genera and species were identified following Barnard (1969), , Myers (1982), Myers and McGrath (1984), Ledoyer (1986), Conlan (1990), Barnard and Karaman (1991), Thomas (1993a), LeCroy (2000LeCroy ( , 2002LeCroy ( , 2004LeCroy ( , 2007, Myers and Lowry (2003), Myers (2004), andSerejo (2004). The species list follows Martin and Davis (2001) for the Suborder Gammaridea, Myers and Lowry (2003) for the Suborder Corophiidea, with an updating following Ahyong et al. (2011) andHorton, Lowry, andDe Broyer (2013). ...
Article
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Estuarine amphipods of the western Gulf of Mexico represent mostly eurythermal species. Sampling took place in Summer and Winter on seagrass beds, macroalgae and bare substrates, at 75 localities in Laguna Madre and 34 in Laguna de Tamiahua, Mexico, with a Renfro beam net and an otter trawl. A total of 19,398 specimens of 19 species were collected. Cymadusa compta was dominant in both lagoons with 63.4% of the total abundance. First records are 7 species for Laguna Madre and 11 species for Laguna de Tamiahua. A literature review updated the number of species from the 19 collected to 29. An analysis of the species' distribution produced 3 zoogeographic patterns: Warm and Caribbean, Warm Temperate and Caribbean, and temperate. A hierarchical cluster analysis of the geographic distribution data of the 29 species produced 2 assemblages: one with an affinity for the warmer regions of the Gulf of Mexico, Caribbean Sea and Brazil, and another associated with the temperate conditions of the northern Gulf of Mexico, the eastern USA, Canada and Argentina, each group indicating a preference for either higher or lower water temperatures. © 2017 Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México, Instituto de Biología.
Book
The pseudo-litoral zone of the Crimean coast of the Black Sea region was explored. The study areas were located in the latitudinal direction from the extreme western point – the coast of Yarylgach Bay (the village of Mezhvodnoe) – to the extreme eastern point – Cape Takil. A study of the macrozoobenthos of the pseudo-litoral zone of the Sea of Azov was carried out in Rifov Bay and in three bays of the Kazantip Natural Reserve. The studied areas differed not only in hydrological and hydrochemical characteristics, but also in the degree of anthropogenic load. According to our data, in the pseudo-litoral zone of the Sea of Azov – Black Sea coast of Crimea, macrozoobenthos was represented by the following taxonomic groups: Polychaeta (33 species), Crustacea (36), and Mollusca (18). Representatives of Ascidiacea, Platyhelminthes, Nemertea, Oligochaeta, Pycnogonida, and Chironomidae were also registered, and their species determination was not carried out for a number of reasons; nevertheless, their presence was noted at the studied stations. Data on the distribution, ecology, and biology of species found in the study region are presented.The book will be interesting for hydrobiologists, zoologists, ecologists, students of biological faculties, and a wide range of readers.
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This catalog documents 303 species within 142 genera and 56 families distributed in the suborders Amphilochidea, Senticaudata and order Ingolfiellida that have been described or reported for the Brazilian coast and continent. Data for these species such as type material, type locality, geographic and bathymetric distribution, ecological notes and remarks, when pertinent, was given. From these, 268 species (~ 90%) are benthonic, marine and/or estuarine occurring from a diverse type of substrates as sediment, algae, sponges, cnidarians, ascideans, mangrove roots, fouling habitats, coral rubble, rodolith banks, etc. In terms of bathymetry, there are 214 species (~ 80%) reported for the Brazilian continental shelf (0–200 m) and 60 (~20%) for the deep sea zone (> 200 m, 50% from the Campos Basin area). There are 35 non-marine amphipods reported from Brazil. Hyalella is the restricted and dominant epigean group and is represented by 22 species, including some hypogean and cave species. Cave dwellers includes 15 species within 6 genera as: Hyalella (5); Megagidiella (1); Potiberaba (1); Spelaeogammarus (7), and Seborgia (1). Among the Bogidiellidae, Bogidiella neotropica Ruffo, 1952 and Marigidiella brasiliensis (Siewing, 1953) are hypogean, but not from caves. The former is the only amphipod species recorded from the Brazilian Amazon Biome, within the Tapajós River, Pará and the latter are found in marine coastal groundwater of Bahia and São Paulo. Considering the landhoppers (truly terrestrial), only two introduced species, Talitroides alluaudi (Chevreux, 1896) and Talitroides topitotum (Burt, 1934) have been found in the Atlantic forest biome, urban parks and sylviculture plantations from the southeast and south of Brazil. Moreover, several amphipod records for Brazil were noticed to be dubious or misidentifications and are listed in a table with pertinent literature.