Article

Use of Multiple Data Sources to Estimate the Economic Cost of Dengue Illness in Malaysia

Schneider Institutes for Health Policy, Heller School, Brandeis University, Waltham, Massachusetts
The American journal of tropical medicine and hygiene (Impact Factor: 2.7). 10/2012; 87(5). DOI: 10.4269/ajtmh.2012.12-0019
Source: PubMed

ABSTRACT

Dengue represents a substantial burden in many tropical and sub-tropical regions of the world. We estimated the economic burden of dengue illness in Malaysia. Information about economic burden is needed for setting health policy priorities, but accurate estimation is difficult because of incomplete data. We overcame this limitation by merging multiple data sources to refine our estimates, including an extensive literature review, discussion with experts, review of data from health and surveillance systems, and implementation of a Delphi process. Because Malaysia has a passive surveillance system, the number of dengue cases is under-reported. Using an adjusted estimate of total dengue cases, we estimated an economic burden of dengue illness of US$56 million (Malaysian Ringgit MYR196 million) per year, which is approximately US$2.03 (Malaysian Ringgit 7.14) per capita. The overall economic burden of dengue would be even higher if we included costs associated with dengue prevention and control, dengue surveillance, and long-term sequelae of dengue.

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    • "Although the case fatality rate of 10-15% from Dengue hemorrhagic (or) Dengue shock syndrome, the people who are suffering from fever during outbreak are literally scared about Dengue fever and its complications due to uncertain clinical course of disease. The economic burdens of Dengue fever were estimated using different models and process in many countries [1] [2] [3] [4]. The economic burden from Dengue fever is higher than that of Japanese encephalitis, upper respiratory tract infection, Hepatitis B in Southeast Asia region accounting for annual cost of 1.65 USD Per Capita. "

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    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: The number of dengue cases has been increasing on a global level in recent years, and particularly so in Malaysia, yet little is known about the effects of weather for identifying the short-term risk of dengue for the population. The aim of this paper is to estimate the weather effects on dengue disease accounting for non-linear temporal effects in Selangor, Kuala Lumpur and Putrajaya, Malaysia, from 2008 to 2010. We selected the weather parameters with a Poisson generalized additive model, and then assessed the effects of minimum temperature, bi-weekly accumulated rainfall and wind speed on dengue cases using a distributed non-linear lag model while adjusting for trend, day-of-week and week of the year. We found that the relative risk of dengue cases is positively associated with increased minimum temperature at a cumulative percentage change of 11.92% (95% CI: 4.41–32.19), from 25.4 °C to 26.5 °C, with the highest effect delayed by 51 days. Increasing bi-weekly accumulated rainfall had a positively strong effect on dengue cases at a cumulative percentage change of 21.45% (95% CI: 8.96, 51.37), from 215 mm to 302 mm, with the highest effect delayed by 26–28 days. The wind speed is negatively associated with dengue cases. The estimated lagged effects can be adapted in the dengue early warning system to assist in vector control and prevention plan.
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