Article

Healing Touch With Guided Imagery for PTSD in Returning Active Duty Military: A Randomized Controlled Trial

Samueli Institute, 2101 East Coast Highway, Suite 330, Corona Del Mar, CA 92625-1900, USA.
Military medicine (Impact Factor: 0.77). 09/2012; 177(9):1015-21. DOI: 10.7205/MILMED-D-11-00290
Source: PubMed

ABSTRACT

Post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) remains a significant problem in returning military and warrants swift and effective treatment. We conducted a randomized controlled trial to determine whether a complementary medicine intervention (Healing Touch with Guided Imagery [HT+GI]) reduced PTSD symptoms as compared to treatment as usual (TAU) returning combat-exposed active duty military with significant PTSD symptoms. Active duty military (n = 123) were randomized to 6 sessions (within 3 weeks) of HT+GI vs. TAU. The primary outcome was PTSD symptoms; secondary outcomes were depression, quality of life, and hostility. Repeated measures analysis of covariance with intent-to-treat analyses revealed statistically and clinically significant reduction in PTSD symptoms (p < 0.0005, Cohen's d = 0.85) as well as depression (p < 0.0005, Cohen's d = 0.70) for HT+GI vs. TAU. HT+GI also showed significant improvements in mental quality of life (p = 0.002, Cohen's d = 0.58) and cynicism (p = 0.001, Cohen's d = 0.49) vs. TAU. Participation in a complementary medicine intervention resulted in a clinically significant reduction in PTSD and related symptoms in a returning, combat-exposed active duty military population. Further investigation of GT and biofield therapy approaches for mitigating PTSD in military populations is warranted.

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    • "However, the assessments were nonblinded to condition and there was no follow-up assessment. A larger RCT (N 123) compared a complementary and alternative medicine approach with an unspecified treatment as usual (Jain et al., 2012). The intervention, called " Healing Touch with Guided Imagery, " reported large effect sizes. "
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    ABSTRACT: Numerous studies and reports document the prevalence of combat-related posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) in military personnel returning from deployments to Iraq and Afghanistan. The Department of Veterans Affairs and Department of Defense recommend cognitive processing therapy (CPT) as one of two first-line treatment options for patients with PTSD. CPT is an evidence-based, trauma-focused cognitive treatment for PTSD that has been shown to be efficacious in a wide variety of populations, but has just begun to be implemented with active duty military. The purpose of this article is to describe treatment considerations that may be pertinent to active duty populations, including stigma related to mental health treatment and minimization of symptoms, duty obligations, and special factors related to rank and occupational specialties. We provide recommendations for navigating these issues within the CPT protocol. Additionally, we discuss common themes that may be especially relevant when conducting CPT with an active duty military population, including blame/responsibility, the military ethos, erroneous blame of others, just-world beliefs, traumatic loss, fear of harming others, and moral injury. Case examples illustrating the use of CPT to address these themes are provided.
    Full-text · Article · Sep 2015 · Cognitive and Behavioral Practice
    • "However, the assessments were nonblinded to condition and there was no follow-up assessment. A larger RCT (N 123) compared a complementary and alternative medicine approach with an unspecified treatment as usual (Jain et al., 2012). The intervention, called " Healing Touch with Guided Imagery, " reported large effect sizes. "
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    ABSTRACT: To determine whether group therapy improves symptoms of posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD), this randomized clinical trial compared efficacy of group cognitive processing therapy (cognitive only version; CPT-C) with group present-centered therapy (PCT) for active duty military personnel. Patients attended 90-min groups twice weekly for 6 weeks at Fort Hood, Texas. Independent assessments were administered at baseline, weekly before sessions, and 2 weeks, 6 months, and 12 months posttreatment. A total of 108 service members (100 men, 8 women) were randomized. Inclusion criteria included PTSD following military deployment and medication stability. Exclusion criteria included suicidal/homicidal intent or other severe mental disorders requiring immediate treatment. Follow-up assessments were administered regardless of treatment completion. Primary outcome measures were the PTSD Checklist (Stressor Specific Version; PCL-S) and Beck Depression Inventory-II. The Posttraumatic Stress Symptom Interview (PSS-1) was a secondary measure. Both treatments resulted in large reductions in PTSD severity, but improvement was greater in CPT-C. CPT-C also reduced depression, with gains remaining during follow-up. In PCT, depression only improved between baseline and before Session 1. There were few adverse events associated with either treatment. Both CPT-C and PCT were tolerated well and reduced PTSD symptoms in group format, but only CPT-C improved depression. This study has public policy implications because of the number of active military needing PTSD treatment, and demonstrates that group format of treatment of PTSD results in significant improvement and is well tolerated. Group therapy may an important format in settings in which therapists are limited. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2015 APA, all rights reserved).
    No preview · Article · May 2015 · Journal of Consulting and Clinical Psychology
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    • "Jain and colleagues conducted a randomized controlled trial to determine whether Healing Touch with Guided Imagery could reduce symptoms of posttraumatic stress disorder. Their findings showed that the intervention resulted in a clinically significant reduction in posttraumatic stress disorder and related symptoms [2]. Therapeutic Touch is a safe and beneficial intervention for cancer patients [3]. "
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    ABSTRACT: The insula is believed to be associated with touch-evoked effects. In this work, functional MRI was applied to investigate the network model of insula function when 20 normal subjects received tactile stimulation over segregated areas. Data analysis was performed with SPM8 and Conn toolbox. Activations in the contralateral posterior insula were consistently revealed for all stimulation areas, with the overlap located in area Ig2. The area Ig2 was then used as the seed to estimate the insula-associated network. The right insula, left superior parietal lobule, left superior temporal gyrus, and left inferior parietal cortex showed significant functional connectivity with the seed region for all stimulation conditions. Connectivity maps of most stimulation conditions were mainly distributed in the bilateral insula, inferior parietal cortex, and secondary somatosensory cortex. Post hoc ROI-to-ROI analysis and graph theoretical analysis showed that there were higher correlations between the left insula and the right insula, left inferior parietal cortex and right OP1 for all networks and that the global efficiency was more sensitive than the local efficiency to detect differences between notes in a network. These results suggest that the posterior insula serves as a hub to functionally connect other regions in the detected network and may integrate information from these regions.
    Full-text · Article · Jul 2013
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