Effect of alternate nostril breathing exercise on cardiorespiratory functions

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Abstract
Pranayama (breathing exercise), one of the yogic techniques can produce different physiological responses in healthy individuals. The responses of Alternate Nostril Breathing (ANB) the Nadisudhi Pranayama on some cardio-respiratory functions were investigated in healthy young adults. The subjects performed ANB exercise (15 minutes everyday in the morning) for four weeks. Cardio-respiratory parameters were recorded before and after 4-weeks training period. A significant increment in Peak expiratory flow rate (PEFR L/min) and Pulse pressure (PP) was noted. Although Systolic blood pressure (SBP) was decreased insignificantly, the decrease in pulse rate (PR), respiratory rate (RR), diastolic blood pressure (DBP) were significant. Results indicate that regular practice of ANB (Nadisudhi) increases parasympathetic activity.
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