Article

Lessons Learned in Developing Community Mental Health Care in East and South East Asia

National Institute of Mental Health, National Centre of Neurology and Psychiatry, Tokyo, Japan.
World psychiatry: official journal of the World Psychiatric Association (WPA) (Impact Factor: 14.23). 10/2012; 11(3):186-90. DOI: 10.1002/j.2051-5545.2012.tb00129.x
Source: PubMed

ABSTRACT

This paper summarizes the findings for the East and South East Asia Region of the WPA Task Force on Steps, Obstacles and Mistakes to Avoid in the Im-plementation of Community Mental Health Care. The paper presents a description of the region, an overview of mental health policies, a critical ap-praisal of community mental health services developed, and a discussion of the key obstacles and challenges. The main recommendations address the needs to campaign to reduce stigma, integrate care within the general health care system, prioritize target groups, strengthen leadership in policy mak-ing, and devise effective funding and economic incentives.

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    • "For example, mental health legislation is absent in Cambodia, China, Laos, Philippines and Viet Nam. There are few psychiatrists in most of the countries, less than 2 per 10,000 population; Japan, however, who has about 94 psychiatrists and Korea has 35 (Ito et al., 2012; World Health Organization, 2005). Further, attitudes towards mental health services may also depend on adherence to Asian traditional culture. "
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