Article

Life sustaining irritations? Relationship quality and mortality in the context of chronic illness. Soc Sci Med, 67, 1291-1299

Institute for Social Research, Ann Arbor, MI, United States.
Social Science & Medicine (Impact Factor: 2.89). 11/2008; 67(8):1291-9. DOI: 10.1016/j.socscimed.2008.06.029
Source: PubMed

ABSTRACT

The social integration and mortality link are well documented but not well understood. To address this issue, the present study examined the context within which relationship quality affects mortality over a 19-year period. Participants were 40 years and older from Waves 1 (1986) and 2 (1989) of the nationally representative Americans' Changing Lives Study (N=2098). Interviews included questions about health and positive and negative relationship qualities with spouse, children, and friends/relatives. A total of 39% (N=827) of participants were deceased by 2005. In support of the main effect model, Cox proportional hazard regressions revealed that consistently low levels of positive support and an increase in negativity from spouse or child from 1986 to 1989 were associated with increased mortality. In support of the buffering effect, among people with chronic illnesses, negative relations at baseline were associated with decreased mortality. We conclude that the social relations-mortality link is more complex than previously understood and is influenced by the context.

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Available from: Toni Antonucci, Jan 29, 2015
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    • "In addition, the nature of marriage and kinship connections gives relationships with spouse and children an involuntary character, which can create contradictory sentiments (e.g., affection vs. conflict) in these relationships (Hogerbrugge & Komter, 2012). A national longitudinal study has reported that low social support and high social strain from spouse or child were associated with increased mortality among middle-aged and older adults (Birditt & Antonucci, 2008). "

    Full-text · Article · May 2013
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    • "In addition, the nature of marriage and kinship connections gives relationships with spouse and children an involuntary character, which can create contradictory sentiments (e.g., affection vs. conflict) in these relationships (Hogerbrugge & Komter, 2012). A national longitudinal study has reported that low social support and high social strain from spouse or child were associated with increased mortality among middle-aged and older adults (Birditt & Antonucci, 2008). "
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    ABSTRACT: This study proposed that, among older adults, higher support and lower strain received from each of the four relational sources (spouse/partner, children, family, and friends) were associated with reduced loneliness and improved well-being and that loneliness might mediate the relationship between support/strain and well-being. Structural equation modeling was conducted using a national sample of adults aged 50 years and older (N=7,367) from the Health and Retirement Study. Findings indicated that support from spouse/partner and friends alleviated loneliness, while strain from all the four sources intensified loneliness; higher support and lower strain from various sources directly and indirectly improved well-being, with indirect effects mediated through reduced loneliness. It was concluded that, in later life, various sources of support/strain engender distinct effects on loneliness and well-being, and loneliness serves as one of the psychological pathways linking support/strain to well-being.
    Full-text · Article · Feb 2013 · Journal of Social and Personal Relationships
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    • "Few studies conceptualize spousal/partner quality as a moderator between stress and health outcomes. For those that do, particularly those examining negative relationship qualities, the results have been mixed (Antonucci et al., 2010;Birditt & Antonucci, 2008). This study provides further understanding regarding the role of not only negative spousal/partner relationship quality in the association between stress and health, but also a more complex picture of the role of positive spousal/partner quality. "
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