Article

Coping Skills, Mental Disorders, and Suicide Among Rural Youths in China

and ‡Department of Sociology, State University of New York College at Buffalo, Buffalo, NY.
The Journal of nervous and mental disease (Impact Factor: 1.69). 09/2012; 200(10):885-90. DOI: 10.1097/NMD.0b013e31826b6ecc
Source: PubMed

ABSTRACT

The strain theory of suicide postulates that psychological strains usually precede mental disorders including suicidal behavior. Lack of coping skills is one of the four strains. This article focuses on the effect of lack of coping skills on individual mental disorders and suicide. Data including 392 suicide cases and 416 community-living controls were from a large psychological autopsy study conducted in rural China. The Hamilton Depression Rating Scale and the Structured Clinical Interview for DSM-III-R were used for the diagnosis of mental disorders. Coping skills were measured by the Coping Response Inventory. The logical analysis and cognitive avoidance coping skills were negatively associated with mental disorders, whereas the taking problem-solving action and acceptance/resignation coping skills were positively associated with mental disorders. This study supports the hypothesis that lack of coping skills to certain strains is likely to lead to mental disorders and suicidal behavior. Improving people's coping strategies may be an effective way to lower the prevalence of mental disorders and suicide.

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Available from: Jie Zhang, Aug 05, 2014
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    • "women and it has been approved in earlier studies with the Chinese suicide data (Zhang, 2010). Believing in a religion not protecting Chinese from suicide has also been studied in our earlier data (Zhang and Liu, 2012; Zhang and Xu, 2007). These two correlates uniquely observed in the Chinese suicide completers can also be applied to the Chinese suicide attempters. "

    Full-text · Dataset · Apr 2015
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    • "women and it has been approved in earlier studies with the Chinese suicide data (Zhang, 2010). Believing in a religion not protecting Chinese from suicide has also been studied in our earlier data (Zhang and Liu, 2012; Zhang and Xu, 2007). These two correlates uniquely observed in the Chinese suicide completers can also be applied to the Chinese suicide attempters. "
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    ABSTRACT: Suicide rates in China are among the highest in the world, although there has been a decreasing trend in the past few years. One practical approach to study the characteristics and risk factors of suicide is to interview the suicide attempters. It was to compare completed suicides with serious attempters that may shed lights on suicide prevention strategies. This is a combination of two case control studies for suicide completers and suicide attempters respectively. After a sample of suicides (n=392) and community living controls (n=416) were obtained and studied in rural China, we collected in the same rural areas data of suicide attempt and studied 507 medically serious attempters and 503 community counterparts. Characteristics and previously observed risk factors were compared between the suicides and the attempters, and we found that the demographic characteristics and risk factors for the suicides were also for the medically serious attempters but at some lesser degrees for the attempters than for the suicides. It was especially true of suicide intent, deficient coping, negative life events, and impulsivity. While most of the demographic characteristics were not significantly different between the suicides and the attempters, most of the clinical variables could distinguish the two groups. The suicide victims and the serious attempters could be of the same group of people who were at the edge of fatal self-injury, and the same clinical risk factors but of different degrees have divided them into the life and death groups. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.
    Full-text · Article · Feb 2015 · Journal of Affective Disorders
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    • "We used its 24 items to assess coping skills and the choices range from 1 ¼not at all to 4 ¼fairly often. The previous studies have indicated the high validity of the CRI scale in the West (Agnew and Kaufman, 2010; Doveston and Cullingford-Agnew, 2006) and the East (Li and Zhang, 2012) samples. The Spielberger Trait-Anxiety scale was used to measure the subjects' anxiety level. "
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    ABSTRACT: Background: The original Psychological Strain Scales (PSS) was published with data from a sample of Chinese population, which consisted of four strain scales: value strain, aspiration strain, deprivation strain, and coping strain. This study aims to validate and develop the English version of the PSS instrument. Method: Together with the PSS, Moos׳s Coping Response Inventory (CRI), Spielberger Trait-Anxiety scale, CES-D depression scale, and the NCS suicidal behavior scales were administered in a survey to a sample (N=280) of American college students. Item-total statistics, Cronbach׳s Alpha, Guttman Split-Half coefficient, factor analyses, correlation analysis and t tests were applied to test the reliability and validity of the English version of the PSS. Univariate and multivariable regression analyses were operated to know how extent the PSS predicts psychopathology such as anxiety, depression and suicidal behaviors. Results: Cronbach׳s Alpha coefficient of PSS was 0.936. The Split-Half coefficient of PSS was 0.839. The reliability of the PSS was excellent. The factor analysis results demonstrated strong construct validity of each scale. The criterion validity and the discriminant validity were both excellent for the English version of PSS instrument. Conclusions: With the excellent scores on both reliability and validity, the English version of the PSS scales can be an excellent measurement for estimating the psychological strain levels of American college students as well as predicting their psychopathology. The PSS can be applicable for research to evaluate and predict suicidal behaviors and mental disorders.
    Full-text · Article · Aug 2014 · Journal of Affective Disorders
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