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Ecological Significance of Bird Populations

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Abstract

Overview: Birds’ ecological functions cover a wide spectrum, from creating soil to shaping primate behavior, and many species play key ecological roles, such as decomposition, predation, pollination, nutrient deposition, and seed dispersal. From an ecosystem functional perspective, birds are mobile links that are crucial for maintaining ecosystem function, memory, and resilience. The three main types of mobile links, genetic, process, and resource linkers, encompass all major avian ecosystem services. Rapid losses of tropical bird species may cause substantial reductions in certain ecosystem processes before we have time to study and understand the underlying mechanisms.
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... Avifauna is a very familiar group of wildlife that contribute to providing ecological services in both natural and modified ecosystems. They play a vital role in ecological functioning and process i.e. act as a bio-indicator in evaluating environmental pollution and healthy ecosystem (Sekercioglu 2006, Slabbekoorn et al. 2008, Mistry et al. 2008, agents of nutrient recycling and plant gene flow through seed dispersal and pollination (Sekercioglu 2006, Sekercioglu et al. 2004. Scavenger birds, such as the Pied Crow (Corvus albus) helps to minimize the levels of disposable wastes (Gatesire et al. 2014) and regulate the population of harmful insects and other pests (Sekercioglu 2006, Sekercioglu et al. 2004. ...
... Avifauna is a very familiar group of wildlife that contribute to providing ecological services in both natural and modified ecosystems. They play a vital role in ecological functioning and process i.e. act as a bio-indicator in evaluating environmental pollution and healthy ecosystem (Sekercioglu 2006, Slabbekoorn et al. 2008, Mistry et al. 2008, agents of nutrient recycling and plant gene flow through seed dispersal and pollination (Sekercioglu 2006, Sekercioglu et al. 2004. Scavenger birds, such as the Pied Crow (Corvus albus) helps to minimize the levels of disposable wastes (Gatesire et al. 2014) and regulate the population of harmful insects and other pests (Sekercioglu 2006, Sekercioglu et al. 2004. ...
... They play a vital role in ecological functioning and process i.e. act as a bio-indicator in evaluating environmental pollution and healthy ecosystem (Sekercioglu 2006, Slabbekoorn et al. 2008, Mistry et al. 2008, agents of nutrient recycling and plant gene flow through seed dispersal and pollination (Sekercioglu 2006, Sekercioglu et al. 2004. Scavenger birds, such as the Pied Crow (Corvus albus) helps to minimize the levels of disposable wastes (Gatesire et al. 2014) and regulate the population of harmful insects and other pests (Sekercioglu 2006, Sekercioglu et al. 2004. Additionally, insectivorous birds and raptors regulate disease vectors such as mosquitoes and rodents (Gatesire et al. 2014). ...
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