Article

Neuroimaging correlates of pathologically defined subtypes of Alzheimer's disease: A case-control study

Department of Radiology, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN, USA. Electronic address: .
The Lancet Neurology (Impact Factor: 21.9). 08/2012; 11(10):868-77. DOI: 10.1016/S1474-4422(12)70200-4
Source: PubMed

ABSTRACT

Three subtypes of Alzheimer's disease (AD) have been pathologically defined on the basis of the distribution of neurofibrillary tangles: typical AD, hippocampal-sparing AD, and limbic-predominant AD. Compared with typical AD, hippocampal-sparing AD has more neurofibrillary tangles in the cortex and fewer in the hippocampus, whereas the opposite pattern is seen in limbic-predominant AD. We aimed to determine whether MRI patterns of atrophy differ between these subtypes and whether structural neuroimaging could be a useful predictor of pathological subtype at autopsy.

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    • "These undetected pathologies may be present and partly account for the patterns of age effects in our sample. However, the observed pattern does not match the " temporal-predominant " or " temporal-parietal " pattern in pre-clinical or clinical AD (McDonald et al., 2009;Whitwell et al., 2012). A similar " temporo-posterior " decline was seen in the overall non-demented group as well as the high-functioning subgroup. "
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    ABSTRACT: Successful brain aging in the oldest old (≥90 years) is under-explored. This study examined cross-sectional brain morphological differences from eighth to eleventh decades of life in non-demented individuals by high-resolution magnetic resonance imaging. 277 non-demented community dwelling participants (71-103 years) from Sydney Memory and Ageing Study and Sydney Centenarian Study comprised the sample, including a subsample of 160 cognitively high-functioning elders. Relationships between age and MRI-derived measurements were studied using general linear models; and structural profiles of the ≥90 years were delineated. In full sample and the sub-sample, significant linear negative relationship of grey matter with age was found, with the greatest age effects in the medial temporal lobe and parietal and occipital cortices. This pattern was further confirmed by comparing directly the ≥90 years to the 71-89 years groups. Significant quadratic age effects on total white matter and white matter hyperintensities were observed. Our study demonstrated heterogeneous differences across brain regions between the oldest old and young old, with an emphasis on hippocampus, temporo-posterior cortex and white matter hyperintensities.
    No preview · Article · Jan 2016
    • "These undetected pathologies may be present and partly account for the patterns of age effects in our sample. However, the observed pattern does not match the " temporal-predominant " or " temporal-parietal " pattern in pre-clinical or clinical AD (McDonald et al., 2009;Whitwell et al., 2012). A similar " temporo-posterior " decline was seen in the overall non-demented group as well as the high-functioning subgroup. "

    No preview · Article · Jul 2015
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    • "Therefore, to extract accurate macrostructural brain signatures of age-related neuropathologies, it is necessary to combine MRI and pathology information on the same individual. A number of studies have used in vivo or ex vivo MRI and autopsy to examine the neuropathologic correlates of brain macrostructure (Barkhof et al., 2007; Burton et al., 2012; Dawe et al., 2011; Erten-Lyons et al., 2013a; Jagust et al., 2008; Josephs et al., 2008, 2013; Kantarci et al., 2012; Kaur et al., 2014; Raman et al., 2014; Rohrer et al., 2010; Toledo et al., 2013; Vemuri et al., 2011; Whitwell et al., 2008, 2011, 2012; Zarow et al., 2011). However, these MRI-pathology investigations were characterized by one or more of the following limitations: (1) relatively long intervals between in vivo MRI and autopsy, which may have allowed formation of additional pathology not captured in the MRI data; (2) relatively limited spatial detail, typically focusing on the volume of the whole brain, ventricles, hippocampus , or other medial temporal lobe structures; (3) use of clinical cohorts, limiting applicability of the findings to the general "
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    ABSTRACT: The objective of this work was 2-fold: to generate macrostructural brain signatures of age-related neuropathologies in a community cohort of older adults and to determine the contribution of brain macrostructure to the variation in antemortem cognition after accounting for the contributions of neuropathologies and demographics. Cerebral hemispheres from 165 participants of 2 cohort studies of aging were imaged with magnetic resonance imaging ex vivo (mean age at death = 90 years; standard deviation = 6 years). The volumes of white matter and 42 gray matter regions were measured. The same hemispheres also underwent neuropathologic examination. Alzheimer's disease pathology was negatively associated with volumes of mainly temporal, frontal, and parietal gray matter regions, and with total white matter volume (p < 0.05, false discovery rate-corrected). A negative association was also detected between hippocampal sclerosis and volumes of the hippocampus, as well as other temporal and frontal gray matter regions (p < 0.05, false discovery rate-corrected). The volume of mainly medial temporal lobe regions explained an additional 5%-6% of the variation in antemortem cognition, above and beyond what was explained by neuropathologies and demographics. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
    Full-text · Article · Jun 2015 · Neurobiology of aging
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