Musculoskeletal Care of the Hemophiliac Patient

ArticleinThe Journal of the American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons 20(9):553-63 · September 2012with15 Reads
Impact Factor: 2.53 · DOI: 10.5435/JAAOS-20-09-553 · Source: PubMed

    Abstract

    Hemophilia is caused by a deficiency of clotting factor VIII or IX and is inherited by a sex-linked recessive pattern. von Willebrand disease, a common, moderate bleeding disorder, is caused by a quantitative or qualitative protein deficiency of von Willebrand factor and is inherited in an autosomal dominant or recessive manner. The most important clinical strategy for the management of patients with hemophilia is the avoidance of recurrent hemarthrosis by continuous, intravenous hematologic prophylaxis. Early hemarthrosis should be aggressively managed with aspiration and clotting factor concentrate until the joint examination is normal. Starting prophylactic factor replacement in infancy may prevent chronic synovitis and arthropathy. The natural history of poorly controlled disease is polyarticular hemophilic arthropathy; functional prognosis is poor. Patients with chronic synovitis may be treated effectively with radiosynovectomy; those who develop joint surface erosions may require realignment osteotomies, joint arthroplasty, and treatment of pseudotumors. Reconstructive surgery for hemophilic arthropathy, especially in patients with factor inhibitor, requires careful hematologic management by an experienced, multidisciplinary team.