Article

Lymphoid Priming in Human Bone Marrow Begins Prior to CD10 Expression with Up-Regulation of L-selectin

Department of Pathology & Laboratory Medicine, University of California, Los Angeles, California, USA.
Nature Immunology (Impact Factor: 20). 09/2012; 13(10):963-71. DOI: 10.1038/ni.2405
Source: PubMed

ABSTRACT

Expression of the cell-surface antigen CD10 has long been used to define the lymphoid commitment of human cells. Here we report a unique lymphoid-primed population in human bone marrow that was generated from hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) before onset of the expression of CD10 and commitment to the B cell lineage. We identified this subset by high expression of the homing molecule L-selectin (CD62L). CD10(-)CD62L(hi) progenitors had full lymphoid and monocytic potential but lacked erythroid potential. Gene-expression profiling placed the CD10(-)CD62L(hi) population at an intermediate stage of differentiation between HSCs and lineage-negative (Lin(-)) CD34(+)CD10(+) progenitors. CD62L was expressed on immature thymocytes, and its ligands were expressed at the cortico-medullary junction of the thymus, which suggested a possible role for this molecule in homing to the thymus. Our studies identify the earliest stage of lymphoid priming in human bone marrow.

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    • "Several human hematopoietic progenitor populations have been reported to produce DCs, including LMPP, CMP, CLP, GMP and MLP, but they also produce other cells of myeloid and lymphoid lineages (Akashi et al., 2000; Doulatov et al., 2010; Galy et al., 1995; Ishikawa et al., 2007; Kohn et al., 2012). Whether DCs and cells of other lineages arise from the same progenitor or from distinct progenitors within these populations is unknown. "
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