A new species of Lucinoma (Bivalvia: Lucinoidea) from the Oxygen Minimum Zone of the Oman Margin, Arabian Sea.

Article (PDF Available)inJournal of Conchology 39(1):63-77 · May 2006with 232 Reads
Abstract
A new species of Lucinoma is described from the upper bathyal zone of the Oman margin, Arabian Sea, living in a low oxygen environment. Shell morphology is conservative within the genus and similar species are found in many oceans. Comparisons are made with all known species but especially with L. bengalensis and L. yoshidai. The anatomy is described and as with other members of the genus the Oman species hosts chemosymbiotic bacteria. No specific adaptations to the low oxygen environment were found, species from cold seep and normal marine sediments being morphologically similar.
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