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STUDIES ON THE REMOVAL OF HEXAVALENT CHROMIUM FROM INDUSTRIAL WASTEWATER BY USING BIOMATERIALS

ABSTRACT

Chromium (VI) is one of the highly toxic ions released into the environment through leather processing and chrome plating industries. There are a number of methods available for the removal of Cr (VI) from industrial wastewater. In recent years, cyanobacteria were used as bioadsorbent for the removal of certain heavy metals. However, most of the conventional methods generate secondary effluent impacts on the recipient environment. The aim of the present investigation is to develop a suitable phytoremediation technology for the procumbens removal of Cr (VI) in industrial wastewater. In the present research work, a novel biomaterial, Tridax (Asteraceae), a medicinal plant was used as a bioadsorbent. The optimum pH of the experimental solution was 2.5 and batch experiments were performed. The efficiency of the activated carbon of the biomaterials for Cr (VI) removal was evaluated by studying the contact time, quantity of adsorbent and concentration of Cr (VI). The result of the present study showed that, 97 percent Cr (VI) removal in synthetic wastewater sample was achieved when 5g of the bioadsorbent was used. This method is also applied to the removal of Cr (VI) from tannery industry wastewater.. Hence, it is recommended that, this bioremediation technology is a cleaner and useful methodology for the removal of Cr (VI) from the industrial wastewater. KEYWORDS Phytoremediation technology, hexavalent chromium, biomaterials and Industrial wastewater.

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Available from: Singanan Malairajan
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    • "The resultant black product was kept in an air-free oven maintained at 160 ± 5°C for 6 hours followed by washing with distilled water until free of excess acid, then dried at 105 ± 5°C. The particle size of activated carbon is in range of 90 and 125 μm (Singanan et al., 2007). AMEBC was prepared by using analytical grade aluminium metal powder and activated biocarbon in a weight ratio of 0.5:5 using concentrated HCl for precipitation. "

    Full-text · Dataset · Mar 2013
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    • "The resultant black product was kept in an air-free oven maintained at 160 ± 5°C for 6 hours followed by washing with distilled water until free of excess acid, then dried at 105 ± 5°C. The particle size of activated carbon is in range of 90 and 125 μm (Singanan et al., 2007). AMEBC was prepared by using analytical grade aluminium metal powder and activated biocarbon in a weight ratio of 0.5:5 using concentrated HCl for precipitation. "
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    Full-text · Article · Jan 2013
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    • "Mientras que el Cr (III) es relativamente inofensivo e inmóvil, el Cr (VI) se mueve fácilmente a través de suelos y el agua; es un agente oxidante fuerte capaz de absorberse a través de la piel (Higuera, 2000). El Cr (VI) forma aniones estables, tales como Cr 2 O 7 -2 , HCrO4 - , CrO4 -2 y HCr 2 O 7 -, los cuales dependen para su formación de la concentración de cromo y el pH, que afectan la toxicidad y la biodisponibilidad (Singanan et ál., 2007). "
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