Article

Slipping and tripping: fall injuries in adults associated with rugs and carpets

National Center for Injury Prevention and Control, Division of Unintentional Injury Prevention, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Atlanta, GA, USA. .
Journal of injury & violence research 08/2012; 5(1). DOI: 10.5249/jivr.v5i1.177
Source: PubMed

ABSTRACT

Background:
Falls are a leading cause of unintentional injury among adults age 65 years and older. Loose, unsecured rugs and damaged carpets with curled edges, are recognized environmental hazards that may contribute to falls. To characterize nonfatal, unintentional fall-related injuries associated with rugs and carpets in adults aged 65 years and older.

Methods:
We conducted a retrospective analysis of surveillance data of injuries treated in hospital emergency departments (EDs) during 2001–2008. We used the National Electronic Injury Surveillance System-All Injury Program, which collects data from a nationally representative stratified probability sample of 66 U.S. hospital EDs. Sample weights were used to make national estimates.

Results:
Annually, an estimated 37,991 adults age 65 years or older were treated in U.S. EDs for falls associated with carpets (54.2%) and rugs (45.8%). Most falls (72.8%) occurred at home. Women represented 80.2% of fall injuries. The most common location for fall injuries in the home was the bathroom (35.7%). Frequent fall injuries occurred at the transition between carpet/rug and non-carpet/rug, on wet carpets or rugs, and while hurrying to the bathroom.

Conclusions:
Fall injuries associated with rugs and carpets are common and may cause potentially severe injuries. Older adults, their caregivers, and emergency and primary care physicians should be aware of the significant risk for fall injuries and of environmental modifications that may reduce that risk.

Download full-text

Full-text

Available from: Karin A Mack, Jan 22, 2014
  • Source
    • "Individual behaviors and physical ability levels are important factors contributing to falls in older adults (Lord, Menz, & Sherrington, 2006; Stevens, Noonan, & Rubenstein, 2009), but falls in the home can also be prevented by recognizing and modifying home hazards and using key safety features. Structural residential hazards associated with falls among older adults include lack of handrails on stairs, lack of grab bars and nonslip surfaces in the bathroom, tripping or slipping hazards (e.g., throw rugs, waxed flooring), outdoor steps, inadequate lighting, and the presence of electrical or telephone cords in the walkway (Carter, Campbell, Sanson-Fisher, Redman, & Gillespie, 1997; Rosen, Mack, & Noonan, 2013). Homes can be designed and constructed to protect elderly occupants from fall-related injuries. "
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Injuries continue to be the leading cause of death for the first four decades of life. These injuries result from a confluence of behavioral, physical, structural, environmental, and social factors. Taken together, these illustrate the importance of taking a broad and multileveled approach to injury prevention. Using examples from fall, fire, scald, and poisoning-related injuries, this article illustrates the utility of an approach that incorporates a social-environmental perspective in identifying and selecting interventions to improve the health and safety of individuals. Injury prevention efforts to prevent home injuries benefit from multilevel modifications of behavior, public policy, laws and enforcement, the environment, consumer products and engineering standards, as demonstrated with Frieden's Health Impact Pyramid. A greater understanding, however, is needed to explain the associations between tiers. While interventions that include modifications of the social environment are being field-tested, much more work needs to be done in measuring social-environmental change and in evaluating these programs to disentangle what works best. © 2015 Society for Public Health Education.
    Full-text · Article · Apr 2015 · Health Education & Behavior
  • Source
    • "Individual behaviors and physical ability levels are important factors contributing to falls in older adults (Lord, Menz, & Sherrington, 2006; Stevens, Noonan, & Rubenstein, 2009), but falls in the home can also be prevented by recognizing and modifying home hazards and using key safety features. Structural residential hazards associated with falls among older adults include lack of handrails on stairs, lack of grab bars and nonslip surfaces in the bathroom, tripping or slipping hazards (e.g., throw rugs, waxed flooring), outdoor steps, inadequate lighting, and the presence of electrical or telephone cords in the walkway (Carter, Campbell, Sanson-Fisher, Redman, & Gillespie, 1997; Rosen, Mack, & Noonan, 2013). Homes can be designed and constructed to protect elderly occupants from fall-related injuries. "

    Full-text · Article · Mar 2015 · Health Education & Behavior
  • Source
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Objective: The aim of this study is to describe the traumatic brain injury (TBI) population and causes and identify factors associated with TBI hospitalizations and mortality in California. Methods: This is a cross-sectional study of 61,188 patients with TBI from the California Hospital Discharge Data 2001 to 2009. We used descriptive, bivariate, and multivariate analyses in SAS version 9.3. Results: TBI-related hospitalizations decreased by 14% and mortality increased by 19% from 2001 to 2009. The highest percentages of TBI hospitalizations were due to other causes (38.4%), falls (31.2%), being of age ≥75 years old (37.2%), being a males (58.9%), and being of Medicare patients (44%). TBIs due to falls were found in those age ≤4 years old (53.5%), ≥75 years old (44.0%), and females (37.2%). TBIs due to assaults were more frequent in Blacks (29.0%). TBIs due to motor vehicle accidents were more frequent in 15-19 and 20-24 age groups (48.7% and 48.6%, resp.) and among Hispanics (27.8%). Higher odds of mortality were found among motor vehicle accident category (adjusted odds ratio (AOR): 1.27, 95% CI: 1.14-1.41); males (AOR: 1.36, 95% CI: 1.27-1.46); and the ≥75-year-old group (AOR: 6.4, 95% CI: 4.9-8.4). Conclusions: Our findings suggest a decrease in TBI-related hospitalizations but an increase in TBI-related mortality during the study period. The majority of TBI-related hospitalizations was due to other causes and falls and was more frequent in the older, male, and Medicare populations. The higher likelihood of TBI-related mortalities was found among elderly male ≥75 years old who had motor vehicle accidents. Our data can inform practitioners, prevention planners, educators, service sectors, and policy makers who aim to reduce the burden of TBI in the community. Implications for interventions are discussed.
    Full-text · Article · Nov 2013
Show more

Similar Publications