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Modeling enhancements in DSR, FSR, OLSR under mobility and scalability constraints in VANETs

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Modeling enhancements in DSR, FSR, OLSR under mobility and scalability constraints in VANETs

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Abstract

Frequent topological changes due to high mobility is one of the main issues in Vehicular Ad-hoc NETworks (VANETs). In this paper, we model transmission probabilities of 802.11p for VANETs and effect of these probabilities on average transmission time. To evaluate the effect of these probabilities of VANETs in routing protocols, we select Dynamic Source Routing (DSR), Fish-eye State Routing (FSR) and Optimized Link State Routing (OLSR). Framework of these protocols with respect to their packet cost is also presented in this work. A novel contribution of this work is enhancement of chosen protocols to obtain efficient behavior. Extensive simulation work is done to prove and compare the efficiency in terms of high throughput of enhanced versions with default versions of protocols in NS-2. For this comparison, we choose three performance metrics; throughput, End-to-End Delay (E2ED) and Normalized Routing Load (NRL) in different mobilities and scalabilities. Finally, we deduce that enhanced DSR (DSR-mod) outperforms other protocols by achieving 16% more packet delivery for all scalabilities and 28% more throughput in selected mobilities than original version of DSR (DSR-orig).

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... In [26], authors present brief understanding of scalability issues of network; however, impact of topology change is not sufficiently addressed. [36] Very effectively presented a programming model for reactive routing with respect to mobile Ad-Hoc Networks. In parallel to [36], [37] We enhanced our presented framework of reactive routing in [40] discussing over all overhead by route discovery and route maintenance processes. ...
... [36] Very effectively presented a programming model for reactive routing with respect to mobile Ad-Hoc Networks. In parallel to [36], [37] We enhanced our presented framework of reactive routing in [40] discussing over all overhead by route discovery and route maintenance processes. In this paper, we modified our existing work by giving a detailed comparison analysis on functionality, operability and performance of chosen three routing protocols of reactive in nature, i.e. ...
... In this work, authors have presented mathematical model for generalized control overhead and discussed three most wanted proactive routing protocols in brief. Considering Vehicular ad-hoc networks,[36] modified a reactive routing protocol ( DSR) and two proactive routing protocols ( FSR and OLSR). In general sense, they modified mobility and scalability aspects in link state routing for VANETs. ...
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Reactive routing protocols are gaining popularity due to their event driven nature day by day. In this vary paper, reactive routing is studied precisely. Route request, route reply and route maintenance phases are modeled with respect to control overhead. Control overhead varies with respect to change in various parameters. Our model calculates these variations as well. Besides modeling, we chose three most favored reactive routing protocols as Ad-Hoc on Demand Distance Vector (AODV), Dynamic Source Routing (DSR) and Dynamic MANET on Demand (DYMO) for our experiments. We simulated these protocols using ns-2 for a detailed comparison and performance analysis with respect to mobility and scalability issues keeping metrics of throughput, route delay and control over head. Their performances and comparisons are extensively presented in last part of our work.
... Among the four selected routing protocols, the former two are reactive whereas the latter two are proactive. We then extend the work [11] and construct of two mathematical frameworks, one at MAC layer to calculate the probabilities of transmission in 802.11 based networks and the other at network layer to calculate the per packet energy cost paid by routing protocols. After briefly analyzing the selected protocols, we enhance their efficiency in terms of throughput, E2ED, and NRL. ...
... Authors select packet delivery ratio (PDR), end-to-end delay (E2ED), and routing packets per data packet (or NRL) as performance metrics for evaluating the performance of the proposed protocol in different scalabilities of the vehicles using probabilistic Nakagami radio propagation model in NS-2. In this paper, we extend the work of [11] and construct a mathematical model to calculate the probabilities of transmission in 802.11 at MAC layer and then evaluate the energy cost paid per packet by routing protocols at network layer. Moreover, we enhance OLSR (in the same way as that in [17]), DSR, and FSR as well. ...
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paper presents mathematical framework for calculating transmission probability in IEEE 802.11p based networks at Medium access control (MAC) layer, mathematical framework for calculating energy costs of the chosen routing protocols at network layer, and enhancements in optimized link state routing (OLSR), dynamic source routing, (DSR) and fish-eye state routing (FSR) to tackle delay in vehicular ad hoc networks (VANETs). Besides the enhancements, we analyze ad hoc ondemand distance vector (AODV) along with OLSR, DSR, and FSR as well. To evaluate the effect of our proposed transmission probabilities in the selected routing protocols, we choose network throughput, end-to-end delay (E2ED), and normalized routing load (NRL) as performance metrics. We also investigate the effect of different mobilities as well as scalabilities on the overall efficiency of the enhanced and default versions of the selected protocols. Simulations results which are conducted in NS-2 show that overall DSR-mod outperforms rest of the protocols.
... Among the four selected routing protocols, the former two are reactive whereas the latter two are proactive. We then extend the work [11] and construct of two mathematical frameworks, one at MAC layer to calculate the probabilities of transmission in 802.11 based networks and the other at network layer to calculate the per packet energy cost paid by routing protocols. After briefly analyzing the selected protocols, we enhance their efficiency in terms of throughput, E2ED, and NRL. ...
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... Among the four selected routing protocols, the former two are reactive whereas the latter two are proactive. We then extend the work [11] and construct of two mathematical frameworks, one at MAC layer to calculate the probabilities of transmission in 802.11 based networks and the other at network layer to calculate the per packet energy cost paid by routing protocols. After briefly analyzing the selected protocols, we enhance their efficiency in terms of throughput, E2ED, and NRL. ...
... Authors select packet delivery ratio (PDR), end-to-end delay (E2ED), and routing packets per data packet (or NRL) as performance metrics for evaluating the performance of the proposed protocol in different scalabilities of the vehicles using probabilistic Nakagami radio propagation model in NS-2. In this paper, we extend the work of [11] and construct a mathematical model to calculate the probabilities of transmission in 802.11 at MAC layer and then evaluate the energy cost paid per packet by routing protocols at network layer. Moreover, we enhance OLSR (in the same way as that in [17]), DSR, and FSR as well. ...
... It decreased the volume of ungraded text and scalable for huge networks, though the issue was scalability. Because of scalability, network size was maximized and the accuracy was maximized [16]. ...
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... We aim to introduce multiple QoS parameters [23]. Mobility constraints also help to achieve better network lifetime similar to [25,39,40]. We can also use sink mobility to improve the energy utilization efficiency as done in [30,37,38]. ...
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... We aim to introduce multiple QoS parameters [23]. Mobility constraints also help to achieve better network lifetime similar to [25,39,40]. We can also use sink mobility to improve the energy utilization efficiency as done in [30,37,38]. ...
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... Routing Packets per Data Packet (or NRL) as performance metrics for evaluating the performance of the proposed protocol in different scalabilities of the vehicles using probabilistic Nakagami radio propagation model in NS-2. In this paper, we extend the work of [11] and construct a mathematical model to calculate the probabilities of transmission in 802.11p at MAC layer and then evaluate the energy cost paid per packet by routing protocols at network layer. Moreover, we enhance OLSR (in the same way as that in [17]), DSR and FSR as well. ...
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... We aim to introduce multiple QoS parameters[23]. Mobility constraints also help to achieve better network lifetime similar to[39,40]. We can also use sink mobility to improve the energy utilization efficiency as done in[30,37,38]. ...
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... This vary paper is an extension of [29]. In [30], Javaid. N. et al. give improvements in modeling two proactive (FSR and OLSR) and one reactive (DSR) routing protocol. ...
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rfc 4728-the dynamic source routing protocol (dsr)
  • D Johnson