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Perceived Sources of Electoral Support for Black and White City Council Members

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Perceived Sources of Electoral Support for Black and White City Council Members

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Abstract

Using data from a random national sample of nearly 1,000 members of city councils, the authors analyze racial differences in the perceptions that city council members have of which groups supported them in their election campaigns. On the whole, racial differences in these perceptions were few. Black incumbent council members receive more support than black non-incumbents, but even members of the latter group perceive a similar amount of group support as do white council candidates. A variety of explanations for these findings is discussed.

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