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The Dynamics of Conflict Behavior in a Mediated Dispute

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Abstract

How does the presence of a mediator change the dynamics of a dispute and help move disputants toward agreement?

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... Third, the primary focus of mediation is on promoting the use of an action-oriented coping strategy. Specifically, mediation promotes problem-solving behavior on the part of disputants (Rogers, 1987) and thereby discourages a reliance on such emotion-based coping strategies as denial, avoidance, and self-blame. This problem-solving approach is thus optimal for producing a resolution of the presenting problem, which fosters a positive developmental outcome. ...
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... Third, the primary focus of mediation is on promoting tbe use of action-oriented coping strategies. Specifically, mediation promotes problem-solving behavior on tbe part of disputants (Rogers, 1987) and thereby discourages rehance on sucb emotion-based coping strategies as denial, avoidance, and self-blame. Active problem solving is optimal for producing a resolution of the presenting problem and for fostering a positive developmental outcome. ...
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REPORTS THE RESULTS OF 2 EXPERIMENTS EMPLOYING A 2-PERSON BARGAINING GAME WITH BILATERAL THREAT. IN THE 1ST, 1/2 THE SS WERE TUTORED IN COMMUNICATING FAIR PROPOSALS, AND 1/2 WERE NOT SO TUTORED. SS ACHIEVED SIGNIFICANTLY HIGHER JOINT PAYOFFS WHEN TUTORED. EXP. II VARIED THE TIME PERIOD DURING WHICH PRETRIAL COMMUNICATION WAS PERMITTED: EITHER BEFORE TRIALS 1-7 OR BEFORE TRIALS 8-14. COMMUNICATION OCCURRING BEFORE THE EARLY TRIALS WAS CONSIDERED TO BE PREDEADLOCK; COMMUNICATION INITIATED ONLY AFTER THE 1ST 7 TRIALS WAS CONSIDERED TO BE POSTDEADLOCK. JOINT PAYOFFS WERE HIGHER WHEN COMMUNICATION WAS INITIATED POSTDEADLOCK.
Rogers is an assistant professor in the Program in Dispute Resolution at John Jay College of Criminal Justice of the City University of
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Susan J. Rogers is an assistant professor in the Program in Dispute Resolution at John Jay College of Criminal Justice of the City University of New York.
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