Article

Nutritional Analysis of Puget Sound Bull Kelp (Nereocystis luetkeana)

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Abstract

Samples of Nereocystis luetkeana, an edible brown algae, were collected from Puget Sound, Wash. The freeze-dried samples were analyzed for proximate and elemental composition and evaluated for protein quality by amino acid analysis and using Tetrahymena pyriformis W. The freeze-dried frond, stipe, and bulb of the algae showed similar composition; however, the frond had a protein content twice that found in the bulb and stipe and five times less crude fiber than the stipe. The proximate analysis of the frond was 15.3% protein, 1.3% crude fiber, 42.7% ash, 1.9% crude fat, and 38.8% carbohydrate (by difference). Based on neutron activation analysis, Nereocysti: contained appreciable quantities of sodium, potassium, calcium, and iron. The algae protein appeared to be of high quality based on growth of Tetrahymena pyriformis W. on a pepsin digest of the algae and on the amino acid profile and in vitro digestibility of the intact algae.

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... DW: dry weight, WW: wet weight. a [11], b [12], c [13], d [14], e [15], f [16], g [17], h [18], i [19], j [20], k [21], l [22], m [23] https://doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0269269.t001 of these were limited in geographic area or number of contaminants analyzed and were conducted over two decades ago [37][38][39]. ...
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a2 International Protein Products Ltd, 168-173 High Holborn, London, W.C. I(Received August 27 1962)(Revised December 17 1962)
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