Article

Follow-Up of Neck and Shoulder Pain Among Sewing Machine Operators: The Los Angeles Garment Study

Department of Family Medicine, David Geffen School of Medicine, University of California, Los Angeles, California
American Journal of Industrial Medicine (Impact Factor: 1.74). 04/2009; 53(4):352 - 360. DOI: 10.1002/ajim.20790
Source: PubMed

ABSTRACT

Background
The aim of the present study is to explore factors affecting or modifying self-reported neck/shoulder pain in sewing machine operators.Methods
We investigated self-report neck/shoulder pain in 247 workers who participated in a 4-month prospective intervention study for musculoskeletal disorders. All participants were immigrants. We examine the influence of individual and work-related factors on changes in neck/shoulder pain during follow-up employing linear mixed models with time-spline functions.ResultsWe observed a dramatic decline (72%) in self-reported pain intensity in the first month of follow-up, followed by a small increase from the first to fourth month (4% per month). Workers who perceived and reported their physical workload as high or worked overtime experienced less overall pain reduction. Higher baseline pain intensity, being of Hispanic ethnicity (vs. Asian), and taking cumulative daily rest time during work of 35 min or more allowing for muscles to rest were associated with a larger pain reduction in the first month, but not thereafter.Conclusion
Our findings indicate that some work-related factors may be of clinical relevance for reducing neck/shoulder pain. Having lower physical workloads and less overtime work should be considered when treating patients or planning workplace interventions for managing work-related musculoskeletal disorders in this underserved immigrant population. Am. J. Ind. Med. 53:352–360, 2010. © 2009 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

Full-text

Available from: Jason Wang
AMERICAN JOURNAL OF INDUSTRIAL MEDICINE 53:352–360 (2010)
Follow-Up of Neck and Shoulder Pain
Among Sewing Machine Operators:
The Los Angeles Garment Study
Pin-Chieh Wang, MS, PhD,
1,2
Robert J. Harrison, MD, MPH,
3
Fei Yu, PhD,
4
David M. Rempel, MD, MPH,
5
and Beate R. Ritz, MD, PhD
1
Background The aim of the present study is to explore factors affecting or modifying self-
reported neck/shoulder pain in sewing machine operators.
Methods We investigated self-report neck/shoulder pain in 247 workers who participated
in a 4-month prospective intervention study for musculoskeletal disorders. All participants
were immigrants. We examine the influence of individual and work-related factors
on changes in neck/shoulder pain during follow-up employing linear mixed models
with time-spline functions.
Results We observed a dramatic decline (72%) in self-reported pain intensity in the
first month of follow-up, followed by a small increase from the first to fourth month (4%
per month). Workers who perceived and reported their physical workload as high or
worked overtime experienced less overall pain reduction. Higher baseline pain intensity,
being of Hispanic ethnicity (vs. Asian), and taking cumulative daily rest time during work
of 35 min or more allowing for muscles to rest were associated with a larger pain reduction
in the first month, but not thereafter.
Conclusion Our findings indicate that some work-related factors may be of clinical
relevance for reducing neck/shoulder pain. Having lower physical workloads and less
overtime work should be considered when treating patients or planning workplace
interventions for managing work-related musculoskeletal disorders in this underserved
immigrant population. Am. J. Ind. Med. 53:352–360, 2010.
ß 2009 Wiley-Liss, Inc.
KEY WORDS: immigrant; sewing machine; garment industry; recovery; neck and
shoulder pain; work organization; musculoskeletal disorder; ergonomic; psychosocial;
sewing machine operator; garment industry
INTRODUCTION
California is the home to the largest garment production
center in the United States, with the majority of the garment
shops located in the Los Angeles Basin. Altogether these
shops employ over 144,000 sewing machine operators, the
majority of whom are minimum-wage, unrepresented,
immigrant women [Chan et al., 2002]. Our previous study
found high prevalence of work-related musculoskeletal pain
for this population [Wang et al., 2007]. In summary, the
prevalence of moderate or severe musculoskeletal pain in
the neck/shoulder region was 24.0% and for distal upper
2009Wiley-Liss,Inc.
1
Departmen t of Epidemiolo gy, School of Public Health, University of California, Los
Angeles, California
2
Department ofFamily Medicine,DavidGeffen School of Medicine,Universityof California,
Los Angeles, California
3
Occupational Health Branch,California Department of Health Services, Oakland, California
4
Department of Biostatistics, School of Public Health, University of California, Los
Angeles, California
5
Division of Occupational and Environmental Medicine, Department of Medicine, Univer-
sity of California, San Francisco, California
Contract grant sponsor: Centers for Disease Control/National Institute for Occupational
Safety and Health; Contract grant number: R01OH07779.
*Correspondence to: Beate R. Ritz, Department of Epidemiology, UCLA, School of Public
Health, 71-254 CHS, Box 951772, 650 Charles E.Young Drive, Los Angeles, CA 90095-1772.
E-mail: britz@ucla.edu
Accepted 23 October 2009
DOI10.1002/ajim.20790. Published online in Wiley InterScience
(www.interscience.wiley.com)
Page 1
extremity it was 15.8%. Elevated prevalence of upper body
pain was associated with age less than 30 years, female
gender, Hispanic ethnicity, being single, having a diagnosis
of a musculoskeletal disorder or a systemic illness, working
more than 10 years as a sewing machine operator, using a
single sewing machine, work in large shops, higher work
rest ratios, high physical exertion, high physical isometric
loads, high job demand, and low job satisfaction.
The persistency of and recovery from work-related
musculoskeletal pain may depend on factors similar to or
different from those contributing to the occurrence of work-
related musculoskeletal disorders (WMSDs). Most studies
published in the WMSDs literature have addressed occur-
rence of chronic or acute injury, but few studies have focused
on the recovery from pain symptoms or illness related to
WMSDs. Factors contributing to WMSDs recovery or lack
thereof are largely unknown, and existing studies thus far
have focused on recovery from low back pain.
Work tasks and physical activity modifications such as
task reallocation and recreational physical activity may be
important for improvement of neck and arm pain [Jonsson
et al., 1988]. There is also evidence that older age may be
associated with slow recovery from shoulder disorders and
that psychosocial work-related factors including perception
of high demands, high control, and lack of social support may
delay recovery from shoulder pain [Bonde et al., 2003].
Furthermore, modeling and describing typical recovery
patterns may encourage more realistic expectations of
recovery in patients, thereby alleviating anxiety about the
length of recovery time [Ferguson et al., 2001]. Knowledge
about individual and work-related factors that can influence
recovery from pain may be useful to both general medicine
and occupational health physicians in suggesting appropriate
treatment and intervention strategies to specific patients.
Previously we presented findings from a randomized
controlled trial in which we provided ergonomic interventions
(chairs) to garment workers and showed how they influenced
neck/shoulder pain over a 4-month period [Rempel et al.,
2007]. Here we assess whether demographic, ergonomic, and
psychosocial work-related factors also affect or modify neck/
shoulder pain intensity, while controlling for our interven-
tions. To accomplish this, we constructed a measure of
proportional change of pain intensity over a 4-month period
and assessed how it was influenced by demographic/
individual factors (including age, gender, ethnicity, and a
history of musculoskeletal problems) and/or work-related
factors such as the intensity and variety of work, total duration
of daily rest time during work, and psychosocial factors (job
strain, social support, job dissatisfaction).
METHODS
The source for this cohort of workers reporting neck and
shoulder pain was an ergonomic intervention study for which
we enrolled sewing machine operators from 13 garment
shops in Los Angeles, California. All employees were
eligible for participation if they performed sewing machine
operations for more than 20 hr per week, were not in a
probationary period, did not have an active workers’
compensation claim, had worked for at least 3 months, and
were not planning to quit their jobs within the next 6 months.
Between October 2003 and April 2005, 560 subjects
were invited to participate in the intervention study. A total of
520 (93.7%) from 13 garment shops agreed to participate and
completed the baseline interview. Within 12 months from
the baseline interview, 480 (86.5%) of the subjects from
11 shops remained in the study and we randomly assigned
them to one of the three interventions: (1) a basic
modification group received a footrest, a small table-top
storage box, a side table, a task lamp, and reading glasses;
(2) an intermediate modification group received a conven-
tional height adjustable task chair that can swivel in addition
to the items given to the first group; and (3) the best
modification group received an ergonomic chair custom
designed for sewing machine operators with a curved seat
pan, an adjustable lumbar-curved backrest, and a seat pan tilt
mechanism in addition to the items given to the first group. Of
these 480 subjects, 277 subjects self-reported neck/shoulder
pain at baseline interview. A total of 30 subjects withdrew
before receiving their assigned intervention package leaving
us with 247 subjects who stayed in the study follow-up and
responded to at least one follow-up survey.
In our previous study [Rempel et al., 2007; Wang et al.,
2008], we demonstrated that neck/shoulder and back/hip
pains were reduced in both the intermediate and best
modification groups compared to the basic intervention
group, and that the interventions provided to the best
modifications group were more effective in reducing neck/
shoulder pain than those given to the intermediate inter-
vention group.
In accordance with National Institutes of Health (NIH)
policy, approval for all study procedures was obtained from
the Offices for the Protection of Research Subjects (OPRS) at
the University of California, Los Angeles (UCLA) and
the Committee on Human Research at the University of
California, San Francisco (UCSF), and all participants
provided written informed consent.
Data Collection
The baseline interview was conducted for all subjects
12 months ahead of the implementation of our interven-
tions. After randomization, we administered four follow-up
standardized surveys spaced 1 month apart, thus, we
followed most workers over a 4-month period. During the
follow-up, 62 monthly interviews (5% of all monthly inter-
views) could not be conducted (Fig. 1). Specifically, there
were 7 subjects who missed the interview in the first month,
Follow-Up of Neck and Shoulder Pain 353
Page 2
18 in the second month, 13 in the third month, and 32 in the
fourth month.
During the baseline interview we collected information
about demographic factors (gender, age, ethnicity, weight,
height, medical history of musculoskeletal problems, and
smoking behavior) and work-related psychosocial factors.
Data on work-related ergonomic factors, such as number of
sewing tasks performed, number of sewing machines
operated, number of workdays per week, total duration of
daily rest time during work, and self-reported musculoske-
letal pain (pain frequency and pain intensity), were collected
at baseline and again each month during follow-up. The
assessment of psychosocial factors has been described in
detail in a previous publication [Wang et al., 2007]. Briefly,
information on psychosocial factors was collected using a set
of questions selected from Karasek’s Job Content Question-
naire (JCQ) [Karasek, 1997]. Answer options ranged from
1 (‘‘strongly disagree’’) to 4 (‘‘strongly agree’’). The total
score for each factor was computed by summing the weighted
item scores for all questions related to that factor using the
formula provided for the JCQ; the sum is expressed on a scale
from 0 to 100. To implement Karasek’s demand-control
model, as recommended, we derived a variable for ‘job
strain’ from the factors ‘job demand’ and ‘job control,
adopting a linear function by subtracting the score of job
control from job demands such that the contributions of low
control and high demands were equally weighted [Land-
sbergis et al., 1994]; that is, a subject scoring 3 for demands
and 2 for control receives the same value for job strain as
someone who scores 2 for demands and 1 for control. We
dichotomized each psychosocial factor at the median in order
to assign subjects to high and low levels of job strain.
Outcomes Definition
Musculoskeletal symptoms experienced in the past
4 weeks were assessed by asking each subject to self-report
pain intensity (0 to 5-point scale with verbal anchors of ‘a
little painful’ for 1 and ‘very painful’ for 5) [Dickinson
et al., 1992]. To examine recovery patterns for neck and
shoulder pain, we relied on a measure of proportional change
of pain intensity over time; specifically, we calculated a pain
score by dividing pain intensity reported at each survey by the
baseline pain value for each worker. This allowed us to
examine how the factors we measured influenced pain
reduction or increase over the 4 months of observed period.
Statistical Methods and Analysis
Linear mixed effects models were applied to estimate the
intervention effects and effects of other factors of interest on
pain score change over follow-up time [Singer, 1998]. The
linear mixed effects models included the following compo-
nents: fixed effects, random effects, and non-independent
covariance structures. The estimates for fixed effects were
assumed to be constant for all subjects. They included time-
independent estimates for individual and psychosocial
factors collected at baseline, such as age and gender,
and time-varying estimates for factors collected over
follow-up time, such as the number of sewing tasks
performed and changes in work schedule. To account for
nonlinearity in the outcome measures over time, we included
a linear spline function of follow-up time with a change point
at the first month of follow-up. The specification of a
linear spline function allows us to estimate the nonlinear
trajectory of pain score change over follow-up time. We
controlled for the type of intervention package each
worker received in all models. In addition, because our
outcome variable—neck/shoulder pain recovery pattern—
was measured at multiple time points for each subject, that is,
longitudinally, we specified a first-order autoregressive
FIGURE 1. Flow chart of subjectsincluded in this analysis.
354 Wang et al.
Page 3
[AR(1)] covariance structure for all linear mixed effects
models. The AR(1) covariance structure allows us to account
for the potential correlations among outcome measures at
different time points within each subject, and to specify the
correlations of two consecutive outcome measures between
increasing time intervals.
Our primary analysis included three linear mixed effects
models to examine the main effect of intervention over
follow-up time while controlling for potential confounders.
The first or our ‘basic’ model included a time factor in
addition to the intervention effect term to establish the
unadjusted pattern of pain score change over time for all
subjects. We adjusted for baseline pain intensity in our
‘simple’ second adjusted model, and in the third ‘fully’
adjusted model, we added 12 additional covariates to
the second model. These covariates were chosen based on
reports in the literature and because in our previous cross-
sectional study we found that they were important [National
Institute for Occupational Safety and Health, 1997; Thomas
et al., 2005; Wang et al., 2007]; these were gender, age,
ethnicity, medical history of musculoskeletal problems,
overtime work, number of tasks performed, number of
sewing machines operated in the past 4 weeks, total rest time
per day, job strain, social support, job dissatisfaction, and
perceived physical workload. Information about all of these
factors was collected at baseline, except for workdays
per week and number of tasks performed in the past 4 weeks,
which were collected longitudinally throughout follow-up.
For the fully adjusted model described above we assume
that each factor of interest has a constant effect on pain
reduction over follow-up time. Thus, we further investigated
the interaction between follow-up time and each factor
separately, adjusting for all other covariates already included
in the fully adjusted model. In other words, we examined
whether each of these factors altered recovery from neck/
shoulder pain over follow-up time. Because our outcome
variable was defined as the proportion of pain at baseline, this
variable was by definition set to 100% at baseline for each
subject. Thus, in our interaction models, the difference in
intercept (or baseline pain) between categories of each factor
cannot be estimated, instead the slope for each category was
estimated. The difference between these interaction models
and the fully adjusted model can be viewed as follows: in the
fully adjusted model, the pattern of pain reduction over follow-
up time is assumed to be parallel for each category of a factor,
while in the interaction models the pattern of pain reduction
over follow-up time allows for different slopes at each level of
that factor. All statistical analyses were performed using
statistical software SAS version 9 [SAS Institute, Inc., 2002].
RESULTS
Of the 247 subjects reporting neck/shoulder pain during
the baseline interview majorities were female (65.2%),
Hispanic, or Asian (75.7% and 21.9%, respectively) and the
mean age was 38 years (Table I). Only 28 workers (11.3%)
reported a medical history of musculoskeletal problems prior
to the interview. About half (54%) of all subjects reported
taking less than 50 min of rest time in a workday. The
three time-varying variables (workdays per week, number of
sewing tasks performed, and number of sewing machines
operated in the past 4 weeks) did not change appreciably
during the 4 months follow-up period (Table II). We observed
a sudden drop in reported pain intensity between baseline
interview and the first follow-up survey, and the pain
intensity remained constant from the first to the fourth
survey (Table III).
Our analyses revealed that the patterns of pain score
change were similar in the basic and the two adjusted models
(results not shown). We observed a 72% reduction for the
mean pain score from baseline to the first month and a non-
discernible increasing trend in pain score from the first to
fourth month (4% per month) of follow-up adjusting for
baseline pain intensity, intervention type, four individual
TABLE I. Frequency Distributions of Demographic Characters for Subjects
Who Reported Neck/Shoulder Pain at Baseline Interview (n ¼ 247)*
Variables Category N %
Gender Female 161 65.2
Male 86 34.8
Age group Mean (SD) 37.5 (9.3)
<30 52 21.1
30^ 39 91 36.8
40^49 76 30.8
50 28 11.3
Ethnicity Asian/Pacific Islander 54 21.9
Hispanic 187 75.7
White 6 2.4
Medical history of No 219 88.7
Musculoskeletal problems Yes 28 11.3
Total rest period in a day (min) Mean (SD) 49.2 (9.8)
0^ 35 34 13.8
>35^ 50 101 40.9
50 112 45.3
Job strain High 136 55.1
L o w 111 4 4 . 9
Social support High 164 66.4
Low 83 33.6
Job dissatisfaction High 144 58.3
Low 103 41.7
Perceivedphysical workload High 186 75.3
Low 61 24.7
*Data included frequency in number [N] and %, and means with standard deviation
(SD).
Follow-Up of Neck and Shoulder Pain 355
Page 4
level factors (age, gender, ethnicity, and history of muscu-
loskeletal problems), four ergonomic factors (overtime work,
number of sewing tasks performed, number of sewing
machine operated, and total duration of daily rest time during
work), and four psychosocial factors (high job strain, high
social support, high job dissatisfaction, and high perceived
physical workload).
Higher baseline pain intensity, being Hispanic (vs.
Asian), work rest periods of 35 min or more per day, and
perceived low physical workload were associated with
greater mean pain score reduction in the first month, while
our estimates of differences were imprecise thereafter (see
Table IV for unadjusted models and Table V for adjusted
models). Workers who took 35 min of rest or more during
work per day experienced approximately a 20% more
reduction in mean pain score compared to their counterparts.
Workers who reported their physical workload as being low
tended to have a 16% more reduction in mean pain score in
the first month and a 2.5% more from the second to
fourth month. No differences were observed in estimated
TABL E II. Frequency Distributions of Time-Varying Variables Among Sewing Machine Operators With Neck/Shoulder Pain at Ba seline and Four Follow-Up
Surveys
Variables Category
Basel ine
(n ¼ 247)
First survey
(n ¼ 240)
Secondsurvey
(n ¼ 229)
Thirdsurvey
(n ¼ 225)
Fourth sur ve y
(n ¼ 209)
N%N%N%N%N%
Workdays per week Mean (SD) 5.4 (0.5) 5.4 (0.6) 5.4 (0.5) 5.3 (0.5) 5.2 (0.5)
Over time (>5 days) 155 62.8 165 68.8 149 65.1 155 68.9 163 78.0
Regular workschedule (5 days
or less)
92 37.2 75 31.3 80 34.9 70 31.1 46 22.0
Numbers of task performedin
each month
M e a n ( S D) 2 .2 (1. 2) 2 .1 (1.2 ) 2 .1 (1.4) 2 .1 (1.1) 2 .0 (1.2)
1 105 42.5 103 42.9 100 43.7 103 45.8 98 46.9
2 46 18.6 45 18.8 45 19.7 44 19.6 38 18.2
3 4919.84719.64519.74017.83818.2
4andmore 4719.04518.83917.03816.93516.7
Numbers of machine operated
in each month
Mean (SD) 1.2 ( 0.5) 1.1 (0. 4) 1.1 (0.4) 1.1 (0.3) 1.1 ( 0.3)
1 215 87.0 219 91.3 207 90.4 212 94.2 199 95.2
2 20 8.1 17 7.1 18 7.9 9 4.0 8 3.8
3 11 4.5 4 1.7 2 0.9 4 1.8 2 1.0
4 and more 1 0.4 0 0 2 0.9 0 0 0 0
TABL E III. Frequency Distributions, Means, Median, and/or Range of Neck/Shoulder Pain Over Time
Variables Category
Basel ine (n ¼ 247)
First survey
(n ¼ 247)
Second survey
(n ¼ 238)
Third survey
(n ¼ 233)
Fourth survey
(n ¼ 209)
N% N% N %N%N%
Intensity ofpain (0-5 scale) Mean (SD) 2.4 (1.0) 0.7 (1.3) 0.8 (1.2) 0.8 (1.4) 1.0 (1.6)
Score ¼ 0 0 0.0 188 78.3 168 73.4 169 75.1 142 67.9
Score ¼1 4 5 18 . 2 7 2 .9 4 1.7 2 0.9 3 1.4
Score ¼ 2 7 8 31. 6 13 5.4 14 6 .1 12 5. 3 16 7. 7
Score ¼ 3 93 37 .7 20 8.3 27 11.8 27 12.0 23 11.0
Score ¼ 4 22 8.9 7 2.9 12 5.2 10 4.4 19 9.1
Score ¼ 5 9 3.6 5 2.1 4 1.7 5 2.2 6 2.9
Proportional pain score
a
Mean (SD) 1 00.0 (0.0) 27.7 (61 .3) 31.8 (59.4) 33.1 (69.0) 41.0 (73.6)
a
Proportional pain score was defined as the proportional changes in pain intensity for each subject during the follow-up period.The pain score for each case is defined as100% at
baseline.
356 Wang et al.
Page 5
pain score change when stratifying according to the
following factors: age, gender, medical history of MSD,
workdays per week, number of task performed, number of
machine operated, job stress, social support, and job
dissatisfaction.
Although none of the interaction terms between any of
these factors and time affected pain score changes over time,
we observed that the mean pain score reduction was about
24% less for workers who reported high physical workload
compared to workers who reported low physical workload
and about 18% less for workers working overtime compared
to workers who did not work overtime. No differences were
observed in the overall pain reduction during our 4 months
follow-up when stratifying according to any of the other
11 factors examined.
DISCUSSION
There is little research evaluating the follow-up of neck/
shoulder pain in a work place setting. To the best of our
knowledge, this is the first study to assess whether changes of
neck/shoulder pain intensity are associated with personal and
work-related factors. Within the setting of an ergonomic
intervention study in garment workers, we employed a
repeated measures approach and a multivariate model to
examine recovery patterns based on longitudinal pain scores
[Cole and Hudak, 1996; Bonacich and Appelbaum, 2000;
Ferguson et al., 2001]. This approach allows for a sensitive
assessment of changes in pain over time while accounting for
repeated measurements in the same subject. We observed a
non-monotonic trend for self-reported neck/shoulder pain
TABL E IV. Unadjusted Time^Effect Interaction Model That Compared the Difference of Longitudinal Change in Mean Pain Score Across Groups (Categorical
Variables) or for One Unit Increase (ContinuousVariables)
Covariates
The differ e nc e of change in the
1st month (1monthminusbaseline)
The differenc e ofmonthly change fro m
the1st to 4th month (mean of
4 months minus1month)
The differ e nc e ofo veral l change during
4 months (sum of the change s in the
1st month and the1s t to 4th month)
Meandifference 95% CI Mean difference 95%CI Meandifference 95% CI
Baseline pain severity
a
6.5 (12.9, 0.1) 1.8 (1.6, 5.2) 1.0 ( 8.1, 6.1)
Age group
30 to <40 vs. <30 11.5 (6.3, 29.2) 6.9 (16.2, 2.5) 9.1 (28.8,10.6)
50 vs. <30 19.6 (2. 4, 36. 9) 4.6 (13.8, 4.5) 5.8 (13. 5, 2 5 .1)
Gender
Male vs.female 3.7 (17.4, 9.9) 2.8 (10 . 0, 4.4 ) 12 .1 (27.2, 3.0)
Ethnicity
Hispanic vs. Asian 20.0 (35.9, 4.1) 7 .0 (1.3, 15 . 4 ) 1.1 ( 16. 3 , 18 .6 )
White vs. Asian 8.9 (34.6, 52.4) 2.1 (20.1, 24.2) 2.1 (20. 1, 24.2)
History of musculoskeletal problems
Yes vs. no 1.2 (19 .5 , 2 1. 8) 1.4 ( 12 . 2 , 9.5) 3.0 (25.9, 19.9)
Overtime work
>5 d/wk vs. 5 d/wk 12.7 (0.3, 25.8) 2.2 (5.2, 9.6) 19.2 (4.1, 34.4)
No. of tasks performed
a
1. 3 ( 5.3, 2.6) 0.5 (1.7, 2 . 5) 0.0 ( 4.4, 4.4)
No. ofmachines operated
a
7.9 (9. 0, 24.8 ) 2.5 (7.9, 12.9) 1 5.4 (6.5, 37.3)
Total rest period in a day (min)
35 to <50 vs. <35 22.0 (41 .9, 2.0) 6.6 (3.9,17. 1) 2.2 (24. 4, 20.0 )
50 vs. <35 24.9 (45.0, 4.7) 3. 9 (6.8, 14.6) 13.2 (35.7, 9.4)
Job strain
High vs. low 1. 5 ( 14. 6, 11. 6 ) 3. 4 ( 3.5,10.2) 8.6 (5.8, 23.0)
Social support
High vs. low 11.8 (25.5,2.0) 3.6 (3.6, 10.7) 1.1 (16.1, 14 . 0 )
Job dissatisfaction
High vs. low 9.9 (23.1, 3.4) 0.6 (6.3, 7.6) 7.9 (22.4, 6.5)
Perceivedphysical workloads
High vs. low 13.8 (1.3, 28.8) 1.9 (6.0, 9.9) 19.6 (2.8, 36.4)
Negative indicates reduction and positive indicates increase
a
Continuous variable estimating for one unit increase.
Follow-Up of Neck and Shoulder Pain 357
Page 6
during the follow-up period. Specifically, pain scores
dropped dramatically in the first month and then steadied
or increased again with time. This drop can be interpreted in
several ways. First, this may suggest that neck and should
pain does improve considerably within a 1-month period in
an actively working population for those workers who remain
on the jobs. Second, it could have been due to postural
improvements after the introduction of our ergonomic
interventions in this workforce. Yet, the drop occurred in
all subjects similarly no matter whether we assigned them to
a control group or to one of two types of interventions.
Alternatively, this early drop in pain scores may in part be due
to a possible bias caused by changes in data collection
procedures between baseline and follow-up surveys. Specif-
ically, while we were allowed to conduct the baseline survey
in a private interview room, the follow-up surveys had to be
administered at each subject’s workstation in order to
interfere minimally with the flow of work in the garment
shops. Even though the generally loud background noise in
the shops minimized the possibility of being overheard,
subjects may have been more concerned in these public
settings, and, thus, underreported pain.
Nevertheless, we identified a number of factors to be
associated with the extent of pain reduction in the
first monthly follow-up survey independent of the inter-
vention effects. These include baseline pain intensity,
ethnicity, total duration of daily rest time during work, and
perceived physical workload. We furthermore found that
TABL E V. Adjusted* Time^Effect Interaction Model That Compared the Difference of Longitudinal Change in Mean Pain Score Across Groups (Categorica l
Variables) or for One Unit Increase (ContinuousVariables)
Covariates
The differ e nc e of change in the
1s t month (1mont h mi nus base l i ne)
The d iffere nc e of m ont hly change fro m
the1st to 4th month(meanof
4 months minus1month)
The differ enc e ofoverall changeduring
4 months (sum of the changes in the
1st month and the1st to 4th months)
Mean difference 95%CI Mean diffe rence 95% CI Mean difference 95% CI
Baseline pain severity
a
8.6 (15. 0, 2.2) 1.5 (1.8, 4.8) 4.1 (11.1, 2 . 8 )
Age group
30 to <40 vs. <30 7.0 (10.8, 24.7) 7.1 (16. 3 , 2 .1) 14.5 (34, 5.1)
50 vs. <30 14.9 (2.7,32.5) 4.2 (13.1, 4.8) 2.5 (17.2, 2 2 .1)
Gender
Male vs.female 0.4 (14 . 2 , 13 . 5) 3.0 (10, 4. 0 ) 9.4 (24.7, 5.9 )
Ethnicity
Hispanic vs. Asian 17.2 (33.9, 0.5) 6.7 (1. 5, 14 .9) 2 .9 ( 15.8 , 2 1.6)
White vs. Asian 11.7 (31.1, 54.4) 2.2 (19.5, 23.9) 18.2 (26.4, 62.9)
History of musculoskeletal problems
Yes vs. no 3.7 (16.7 , 24.2) 0.2 (10.9, 10.4) 3.1 (19. 5, 2 5. 6 )
Overtime work
>5 d/wk vs. 5 d/wk 10.4 (2.9, 23.6) 2.6 (4.7, 9.9 ) 18.2 (2.9, 33.5)
No. of tasks performed
a
2.3 (6.2, 1.7) 0.4 (1.6, 2 . 5 ) 1. 0 ( 5.5, 3.5)
No. ofmachines operated
a
8.2 (8.6, 25.0) 2.5 (7.8, 12.8) 1 5.7 (6.1, 37.5)
Total rest period in a day (min)
35 to <50 vs. <35 21.2 (41.5, 0.9) 3.4 (7.1, 13 .9) 10 . 9 ( 33.7,11.8)
50 vs. <35 20.9 (41 . 1, 0.8) 6.0 (4.4, 16.3) 3.1 (25.8,19.7)
Job strain
High vs. low 4.3 (17.2, 8.6) 3.6 (3.1,10.3) 6.4 (7.6, 20.4)
Social support
High vs. low 10.9 ( 24.5, 2.7) 3. 4 (3.6,10.5) 0.6 (15 . 4, 14 .1)
Job dissatisfaction
High vs. low 9.1 (22.1, 4.0) 0.6 (6.2, 7.3) 7.4 (21.6, 6.8)
Perceivedphysical workloads
High vs. low 16.4 (1.4, 31.3) 2.5 (5. 4,10.3) 23.8 (7.2, 40.5)
Negative indicates reduction and positive indicates increase.
*The adjusted model included time, the effect by time interaction, and all other variables in this table.The interaction between each factor and time was added in the model one at
a time.
a
Continuous variable estimating for one unit increase.
358 Wang et al.
Page 7
physical workload and overtime work modified the change in
pain score during the 4-month follow-up period.
A randomized controlled trial examined follow-up of
lateral epicondylitis in a general practice [Haahr and
Andersen, 2003] and assigned 266 patients randomly to
receive minimal occupational intervention or the usual
approach in general practice. The minimal occupational
intervention involves some education about the disorder,
instruction on how to perform some exercises, and
encouragement to remain active. After 1 year of follow-up,
both intervention and control group received more than 80%
of improvement in pain condition while intervention was not
followed by any difference in pain score or perceived overall
development compared with the control group. This study
also reported that poor overall improvement in 1 year of
follow-up was related to holding a manual job, experiencing
high level of physical strain at work, and reporting high level
of pain at baseline. Another longitudinal study suggested that
subjects with at least two out of three biomechanical strains at
work such as push/pull activities, working with the hands
above shoulder level, and working with vibrating tools,
experienced poorer neck or shoulder pain than the general
working population [Grooten et al., 2007]. These findings
support our own results that perceived high physical work-
load and overtime work (working more than 5 days per week)
are associated with poorer neck and shoulder pain over time.
Work-related psychosocial factors such as job strain,
social support, and job satisfaction have also been previously
associated with reports of musculoskeletal pain [Ariens et al.,
2001; Andersen et al., 2003; Helliwell and Taylor, 2004].
Furthermore, these factors may modify the state of disorders
of the upper body region [Chard et al., 1988; Houtman et al.,
1994; Cole and Hudak, 1996; Toomingas et al., 1997;
Westgaard, 1999; Bonde et al., 2003]. Our previous cross-
sectional analyses of these data found high job demands and
low job satisfaction to be related to a higher prevalence of
neck and shoulder pain at baseline [Wang et al., 2007] but our
data were inconclusive with regard to whether these factors,
measured at baseline only, also influence changes in neck/
shoulder pain over time.
High baseline pain intensity, Hispanic race (vs. Asian),
total duration of daily rest time during work of 35 min or
more allowing for the muscle to rest, and perceived lower
physical workload were all associated with larger pain
reductions within the first month of follow-up, and the initial
differences remained similar during the additional 3 months
of follow-up except for ethnicity. We acknowledge that self-
reporting of pain and work-related factors may have
introduced some reporting bias. During follow-up especially
between the second and fourth months, we observed that
workers with higher work loads and job strain, and those
taking less rest time during work tended to finish the monthly
surveys more quickly to be able to return to work. This may
have compromised data quality for pain measures during
follow-up in a differential way, that is, under-reporting of
pain may have occurred more often in the most highly
exposed workers; the resulting misclassification is likely to
have weakened effect estimates for these factors on pain
severity. Also, the data presented here were collected in a
convenience sample of 13 garment shops located in Los
Angeles Basin willing to cooperate in an ergonomic
intervention study. This type of convenience sampling may
result in effects different from those one would estimate in a
representative study of all garment workers, to the extent that
the shops and employees are different from shops choosing
not to participate in such a study. In fact, due to the rigorous
eligibility criteria for our intervention study,
4
this population
most likely represented a more stable garment worker
population working in shops willing to participate in
intervention research. Finally, several of the garment shops
participating in our study had to close down during follow-up
due to the impact of unexpected changes in international
trade policies. Thus, we were unable to retain subjects in our
study for more than a 4-month follow-up period. Studies with
extended follow-up exploring a longer term follow-up of
these types of pain are warranted and would need to target
relatively stable working populations.
Our study also has several methodological strengths. We
obtained detailed information for work-related and psycho-
social factors over time, which allowed us to use a multilevel
modeling approach and to relate repeated measures of key
exposure factors to outcomes over time while adjusting
for time-varying confounders. The use of a linear mixed
model improves efficiency compared to traditional uncondi-
tional regression modeling [Greenland, 1992; Witte et al.,
1994]. Since subjects may have different pain perception
thresholds those reporting higher pain intensities at baseline
would be able to improve more than subjects reporting a
lower intensity at baseline. Using a pain score proportional to
baseline pain intensity standardizes the range of pain scores
for all subjects by assigning an equal pain level to every
subject at baseline.
In conclusion, garment workers reporting neck/shoulder
pain at baseline and perceiving their work as physically very
demanding (high physical workload) or working overtime
(more than 5 days per week on average) experienced less
reduction in pain over the 4 months study period compared to
workers who perceived their work as requiring a low
physical effort or who worked 5 days per week or less. In
addition, higher baseline pain intensity, being of Hispanic
ethnicity (vs. Asian), and taking cumulative daily rest time
during work of 35 min or more allowing for the muscle to rest
lead to a larger pain reduction in the first month, and the
difference remained the same over follow-up except for
ethnicity. These ndings may be useful for guiding medical
management and expectations of recovery from work-related
neck/shoulder pain among this underserved immigrant
population.
Follow-Up of Neck and Shoulder Pain 359
Page 8
ACKNOWLEDGMENTS
This study was supported in part by a grant (1 R01
OH007779) from the Centers for Disease Control/National
Institutes for Occupational Safety and Health. The authors
wish to thank the Los Angeles Garment Worker Center and
participating garment shops located in the Los Angeles Basin
for their cooperation and support of this study. No funding
source or sponsor had any role in the design and conduct of
the study; collection, management, analysis, or interpretation
of the data; or preparation, review, or approval of the
manuscript.
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  • Source
    • "Therefore, the respective muscle group tension is considered to be the main cause of pain. A high occurrence of musculoskeletal complaints among clothing industry employees has been already described by many authors [3-8]. It is known that high work pace, lack of control over work, and insufficient co-workers’ support can lead to muscles fatigue and chronic pain in different body parts [9,10]. "
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    Full-text · Article · Sep 2013 · Journal of Occupational Medicine and Toxicology
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    • "Textile work is monotonous and potentially harmful in that it requires prolonged non-neutral joint postures and highly repetitive movements. Despite the potential for increased neck and shoulder injury, relatively few studies have focused on this profession [1] [2]. Overuse injury may be particularly prevalent as workers are generally allocated into two or three shifts in large factories; some small enterprises may employ only two 12-hour shifts, working 5–7 days a week. "
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract] ABSTRACT: The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of scapular muscle endurance on chronic shoulder pain in textile workers. In total, 91 textile workers were divided into two groups based on the presence (n=43) or absence (n=48) of chronic shoulder pain, as assessed using the Nordic Musculoskeletal Questionnaire (NMQ). The endurance of the serratus anterior and trapezius muscles was assessed using the Scapular Muscle Endurance (SME) test. In the group with chronic shoulder pain, mean scapular muscle endurance was significantly lower than that in the pain-free group (t-test, p< 0.05). There was a significant negative correlation between rest - activity pain intensity and SME (Pearson correlation analysis, p< 0.01). Scapular muscle endurance has an effect on the development of shoulder pain in textile workers.
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  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract] ABSTRACT: This cross-sectional study aimed to identify the prevalence of musculoskeletal symptoms and ergonomic risks in female sewing machine operators at a textile company. The study sample comprised all female sewing machine operators in the company. The sample included 283 sewing machine operators. Data were collected through the use of the adapted Nordic Musculoskeletal Questionnaire and by direct observations via the rapid upper limb assessment (RULA) to determine ergonomic risks. RULA is a validated tool for assessment of ergonomic risks. The mean age of the women was 30.2 (SD: 8.4) and the mean number of years of employment was 13.4 (SD: 5.5). The highest prevalence rates for the women’s musculoskeletal symptoms were in the trunk (62.5%), neck (50.5%), and shoulder (50.2%). Of the women, 65% had experienced musculoskeletal pain or discomfort over the last 6 months. Pain intensity of these symptoms was assessed with a visual analogue scale. The average pain intensity of the women was found to be 3.5 (SD: 2.8). Results of the RULA scores were found to be quite high. There were no employees who received RULA scores of 1–2, which indicates acceptable postures (all scores >5). The final RULA scores of 6.9 indicate that the participants’ postures at their work stations need to be investigated immediately.
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