Interrelationship between splanchnic and leg exchange of glucose and other blood borne energy metabolites during abdominal surgery

ArticleinClinical Physiology 1(1):59 - 72 · June 2008with10 Reads
DOI: 10.1111/j.1475-097X.1981.tb00874.x

    Abstract

    In eight patients undergoing cholecystectomy, measurements of leg blood flow, splanchnic blood flow and arterio-venous differences in oxygen, glucose, lactate, pyruvate, glycerol, 3-hydroxybutyrate and alanine were made. Splanchnic glucose release averaged 1 1 mmol/min. The uptake of glucose into leg tissue was low. The rise in arterial glucose concentration was about I mmol/h during surgery. At the end of surgery splanchnic oxygen uptake was increased by 70% and the alanine uptake into the same region was comparable to that described in patients with septic complications of surgery. The plasma insulin concentration was low compared with the arterial glucose level.
    The data suggest that during abdominal surgery (a) increase in arterial glucose concentration can be fully accounted for by slightly increased splanchnic glucose release and a low peripheral utilization; (b) release of gluconeogenic substrates from peripheral tissues is balanced by splanchnic uptake; (c) disturbed relation between glucose and insulin, enhanced gluconeogenesis, increased splanchnic oxygen uptake and fat-mobilizing lipolysis are in accordance with a raised sympatho-adrenergic activity.