How long do you benefit from vacation? A closer look at the fade‐out of vacation effects

Article (PDF Available)inJournal of Organizational Behavior 32(1):125 - 143 · January 2011with 435 Reads
DOI: 10.1002/job.699
Abstract
This study adds to research on the beneficial effects of vacation to employees' well-being and on the fade-out of these effects. One hundred and thirty-one teachers completed questionnaires one time before and three times after vacationing. Results indicated that teachers' work engagement significantly increased and teachers' burnout significantly decreased after vacation. However, these beneficial effects faded out within one month. Applying hierarchical regression analyses, we investigated the fade-out of vacation effects in detail. In line with the Job Demands-Resources model, job demands after vacation sped up the fade-out of beneficial effects. Additionally, leisure time relaxation experiences after vacation delayed the fade-out of beneficial effects. We conclude that reducing job demands and ensuring leisure time relaxation can prolong relief from vacation. Copyright © 2010 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.
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