Article

Creative Teachers and Creative Teaching Strategies

Authors:
To read the full-text of this research, you can request a copy directly from the authors.

Abstract

The purpose of this study is to explore the factors that influence creative teaching and to find out what effective strategies are used by three award-winning teachers in the learning area of Integrated Activities. As creative thinking is crucial for the knowledge economy, it is essential that education serves its purpose in improving this important aspect. The methods used for data collection include in-depth interview, focus group interview, classroom observation and content analysis. Three teachers with a GreaTeach Creative Instruction Award for creative teaching in the Integrated Activities field were selected as subjects. Results were acquired by analysing the interview content, the teaching plans, teachers’ reflection and the classroom observation videotapes. The study found that: the factors influencing creative teaching in Integrative Activities are (a) personality traits: persistence, willingness to develop, acceptance of new experiences, self-confidence, sense of humour, curiosity, depth of ideas, imagination, etc.; (b) family factors: open and tolerant ways of teaching children, creative performance of parents, etc.; (c) experiences of growth and education: self-created games and stories, brainstorming between classmates, etc.; (d) beliefs in teaching, hard work, motivation and (e) the administrative side of school organization. Among these factors, beliefs in teaching, hard work and motivation are the main aspects. The effective teaching strategies used by the awarded teachers are: student-centred activities, a connection between teaching contents and real life, management of skills in class, open-ended questions, an encouragement of creative thinking and use of technology and multimedia. Integrated Activities are closely connected to life experience and a basis for the development of creative thinking within education.

No full-text available

Request Full-text Paper PDF

To read the full-text of this research,
you can request a copy directly from the authors.

... Despite creative pedagogy being widely recognized as being effective in fostering interest in science subjects -and this is explicitly stated in the national policy -the levels of creativity and practice of Malaysian teachers is still inconclusive (Chua et al., 2003;Hamsiah, 2004;Horng et al., 2005;Nachiappan et al., 2017;Said & Alias, 2013). The researchers suggest that further research should be conducted to verify the creative pedagogy of science teachers in Malaysia. ...
... The concept of creative science teaching or creative pedagogy is embedded in several instances of unconventional teaching strategies, among which meaningful discovery (Khabibah et al., 2017;Wartono et al., 2017), student-based investigations (Allchin et al., 2014), inquiry in historical experiment exploration (Schvartzer et al., 2021), engagement in scientifically oriented inquiry (Cairns & Areepattamannil, 2019;Wagh et al., 2017), prioritizing direct experience and personal reflection (Djonko-Moore et al., 2018;Horng et al., 2005), evidence-based explanations by a field expert (Castagneyrol et al., 2020;Kelemen-Finan et al., 2018), interdisciplinary STEM (Abdullah et al., 2018;Karampelas, 2019) and connecting explanations to scientific knowledge (Henriksen & Mishra, 2015;Miller & Krajcik, 2019). In addition to the listed strategies for teaching science content, skills and values, creative science learning is also infused in the way knowledge is transferred or communicated (Conradty et al., 2020). ...
... Considering the importance of creativity in teaching, we must acknowledge that creative pedagogy itself is not developed in a vacuum. Studies suggest five important aspects related to understanding teacher creativity in teaching and learning in science classrooms, that is, teacher knowledge, the workplace environment, multifaceted use of teaching aids, teaching skills, and a focus on science process skills (i.e, Hamdallah et al., 2014;Henriksen & Mishra, 2015;Horng et al., 2005;Maulidah et al., 2021). Cremin and Chappell (2019) suggest the that teachers have to understand and broaden their pool of pedagogical strategies in order to foster learners' creativity . ...
Book
Full-text available
We are very happy to publish this issue of the International Journal of Learning, Teaching and Educational Research. The International Journal of Learning, Teaching and Educational Research is a peer-reviewed open-access journal committed to publishing high-quality articles in the field of education. Submissions may include full-length articles, case studies and innovative solutions to problems faced by students, educators and directors of educational organisations. To learn more about this journal, please visit the website http://www.ijlter.org. We are grateful to the editor-in-chief, members of the Editorial Board and the reviewers for accepting only high quality articles in this issue. We seize this opportunity to thank them for their great collaboration. The Editorial Board is composed of renowned people from across the world. Each paper is reviewed by at least two blind reviewers. We will endeavour to ensure the reputation and quality of this journal with this issue.
... There are many creative teaching frameworks and strategies developed by scholars. Among them are (a) Shared Puzzlement by Woods (2004), (b) Creative Instructions by Horng, Hong, Chanlin, Chang, and Chu (2005), and (c) Creative Cycle by Best and Thomas (2008). Woods (2004) identified that creative teaching can be obtained through the spontaneous reaction by using students' prior knowledge and experiences at homes, in schools and vice versa. ...
... Going with the flow is a way to encourage students to come up with solutions of relevant occurrences in students' lives which Woods referred as shared puzzlement. Horng et al (2005) hypothesized five main strategies to achieve creative instruction. They are: (1) student-centered learning, (2) use of multi-teaching aids, (3) classroom management strategies, (4) connection between teaching content and real-life experience, and (5) open questions and encouragement of creative thinking. ...
... They use strategies for creative learning in their daily teaching in order to incite creativity into their students. These results were found consistent with Esquivel (1995); Horng et al. (2005); Faizuddin (2017); Seechaliao (2017) except for Schacter et al. (2006) who finds teaching strategies did not implement by the teacher which nourish students creativty. They provide an effective learning environment for creativity to their students. ...
Article
Full-text available
The present study focused on the identification of creative teaching practices and their effect on the academic achievement of students at university level. The objectives of the study were: to identify different creative teaching practices used by teachers at university level; to find out the effect of creative teaching practices on the academic achievement of university students. The study used the quantitative methods and followed the descriptive survey research design. The 77 faculty members who are taking courses of BS (Hons) in Fall 2018 semester was selected as the sample of the study by using the total population sampling technique. A self-developed questionnaire was used. The findings of the study showed that faculty members often use creative teaching practices in their teaching. It was also identified that creative teaching practices have a significant effect on academic achievement of university students. So, it is recommended that faculty members may be encouraged to participate in workshops which may be helpful for their professional development to make the teaching learning process more effective. It may also be recommended that teachers may use creative teaching practices in the class which in result increase students academic achievement.
... Despite creative pedagogy being widely recognized as being effective in fostering interest in science subjects -and this is explicitly stated in the national policy -the levels of creativity and practice of Malaysian teachers is still inconclusive (Chua et al., 2003;Hamsiah, 2004;Horng et al., 2005;Nachiappan et al., 2017;Said & Alias, 2013). The researchers suggest that further research should be conducted to verify the creative pedagogy of science teachers in Malaysia. ...
... The concept of creative science teaching or creative pedagogy is embedded in several instances of unconventional teaching strategies, among which meaningful discovery (Khabibah et al., 2017;Wartono et al., 2017), student-based investigations (Allchin et al., 2014), inquiry in historical experiment exploration (Schvartzer et al., 2021), engagement in scientifically oriented inquiry (Cairns & Areepattamannil, 2019;Wagh et al., 2017), prioritizing direct experience and personal reflection (Djonko-Moore et al., 2018;Horng et al., 2005), evidence-based explanations by a field expert (Castagneyrol et al., 2020;Kelemen-Finan et al., 2018), interdisciplinary STEM (Abdullah et al., 2018;Karampelas, 2019) and connecting explanations to scientific knowledge (Henriksen & Mishra, 2015;Miller & Krajcik, 2019). In addition to the listed strategies for teaching science content, skills and values, creative science learning is also infused in the way knowledge is transferred or communicated (Conradty et al., 2020). ...
... Considering the importance of creativity in teaching, we must acknowledge that creative pedagogy itself is not developed in a vacuum. Studies suggest five important aspects related to understanding teacher creativity in teaching and learning in science classrooms, that is, teacher knowledge, the workplace environment, multifaceted use of teaching aids, teaching skills, and a focus on science process skills (i.e, Hamdallah et al., 2014;Henriksen & Mishra, 2015;Horng et al., 2005;Maulidah et al., 2021). Cremin and Chappell (2019) suggest the that teachers have to understand and broaden their pool of pedagogical strategies in order to foster learners' creativity . ...
Article
Creative pedagogy has been explored extensively, and previous research suggests that there is a gap between the level and practice of creativity of science teachers, and that it varies by school location. The aim of this study was to determine the levels of creativity, and creativity practice of primary school science teachers, and differences in the levels of creativity and creativity practice of primary school science teachers based on school location. The Torrance Tests of Creative Thinking (TTCT) were used to acquire qualitative data from 20 participants, and a questionnaire of creativity practice in science teaching was used to collect quantitative data from 409 participants. The qualitative data were analyzed according to the TTCT scoring technique and the quantitative data were analyzed descriptively using Statistical Package for the Social Sciences 26. This study found that, that while overall teacher creativity was low, the teachers perceived that they employed highly creative practices. No difference was found in relation to environment, teaching aids, skills and science process skills of teachers in urban and rural areas. However, teachers in rural areas were more knowledgeable about creativity, while teachers in urban areas were better at practising it. This research provides baseline evidence on current practices in creative pedagogy of science teachers nationwide.
... Following this type of didactical strategies, (student) teachers adopt and implement strategies that enables the learners to understand the complex learning problems (Horng et al., 2005). The teacher introduces exercises removing difficulties in lesson content and help students to comprehend the knowledge (Westwood, 2008). ...
... Especially choosing interactive strategies is helpful to make student actively engaged in the classroom (Van de Grift, 2007). This boosts students' self-confidence (Horng et al., 2005) and students' vigilance (Trees, 2013). Student-centred didactical strategies are more apt to keep students actively engaged in the classroom (Westwood, 2008). ...
... Students are encouraged to raise questions (Trees, 2013). The strategies also try to establish a connection between the teaching content and real life (Horng et al., 2005). And most of all, the teacher provides feedback to students and monitors whether lesson objectives have been achieved. ...
Article
Didactical strategies are one of the most influential vehicles that directly contribute to transforming knowledge. Varying types of didactical approaches are being adopted and implemented in the preparation of future teachers in the initial teacher education set up. The current conceptual paper is based on rigorous literature review on the typologies of didactical strategies adopted in the initial teacher education. The purpose of this conceptual and theoretical study is to evaluate and contrast varying didactical approaches while navigating through literature. The study also aims at exploring the interrelationship of didactical approaches with teacher cognitions i.e., teacher pedagogical beliefs. The methodology of this study based on the selection of six types of didactical strategies by Van De Grift (2007) and to compare and contrast them with other typologies available in literature and to explore the interrelationship with teachers' pedagogical beliefs. The study concludes that the varying typologies of didactical strategies are being adopted and implemented in the ITE set up and these strategies have strong relationship with teacher's pedagogical beliefs. The study recommends that the teachers' cognitions i.e., teachers' pedagogical beliefs may be included in the curriculum when preparing future teachers in the initial teacher education setting. These findings are substantial for policy makers, curriculum developers, head teachers, and other stakeholders in the initial teacher education.
... A great deal of studies has been done to examine the role of creativity in education and has mentioned reasons why creativity-supportive strategies are essential (Al-Dababneh, Al-Zboon, & Ahmad, 2017;Baer & Garrett, 2010;Beghetto & Kaufman, 2014;Chan & Yuen, 2015;Davies et al., 2012;De Souza Fleith, 2000;Dewett, 2006;Glăveanu, 2018;Horng et al., 2005;Soh, 2000;TAN, 2001). TAN (2001) investigated Singaporean elementary school teachers' perceptions of activities helpful in promoting creativity. ...
... He concluded that relaxing activities that can bring forth fun should be regarded as necessary for inducing creative thinking. Horng et al. (2005) conducted a study aimed at finding the factors that influence creative teaching. The participants were primary and junior high school teachers. ...
... As Soh (2000) mentioned, a creative teacher encourages his students to ask questions without restrictions even if they appear unrelated. Horng et al. (2005) mentioned open questions and encouragement to creative thinking as the strategies of creative instructions. The findings revealed that Iranian EFL teachers encourage their students to ask questions but not any questions and answer the questions patiently. ...
Article
Full-text available
This study investigated the creativity-supportive behaviors of Iranian EFL teachers. A mixed-methods data collection approach was adopted: quantitative data were obtained from randomly selected 94 teachers and 216 students through the Persian version of the Creativity Fostering Teaching (CFT) index (Soh, 2000), and qualitative data were collected via students' reports on twelve classroom aspects. To analyze the quantitative data, an independent samples t-test and for the qualitative data, thematic analysis coding were used. There was a significant difference between the teachers' and the students' views on creativity-supportive behaviors of Iranian EFL teachers. Additionally, environment and interaction were extracted as two main themes from the analysis of the qualitative data. These two themes were discussed as the central factors influencing the creativity-supportive behaviors of the teachers. Although most Iranian EFL teachers want and try to adopt strategies and activities to develop or support creativity in their classrooms, the results showed that Iranian EFL students do not experience the classrooms as a locus of supporting creativity. Generally, creativity is not implemented and supported in Iranian EFL classrooms. The findings illustrate that teacher-training programs should equip Iranian EFL teachers with the knowledge and strategies of creativity-fostering instruction.
... In this regard, teachers are able to ignite the creativity of learners as they pass on their enthusiasm, imagination and confidence to learners (Lin, 2009;Lucas, 2001). It is with such traits that creative teachers are able to navigate the learning experiences of students through student-centred creative teaching methods such as student inquiry, demonstration, discovery learning, role playing, group discussions and presentation (Horng, Hong, ChanLin, Chang & Chu, 2005;Starko, 2010). These methods are both effective and creative and can be utilized across subject domains (Starko, 2010). ...
... Creative teachers must from time to time be prepared to risk letting go of structured lesson plans and embrace new insights and questions from students about real life situations and problems which may demand spontaneous response and discovery. Teachers must have the courage to improvise and adapt to ideas from students on lessons and be able to re-adjust lesson plans to still achieve the goals and objectives of lessons (Horng et al, 2005;Sawyer, 2006). Similarly, the creative teacher should be willing to make mistakes and learn from students (Lucas, 2001). ...
... When teachers identify themselves and teaching practice as creative it makes a big difference in fostering the creativity of students. Creative teachers are usually intrinsically motivated displaying qualities such as enjoyment of tasks, keen interest and involvement (in students and teaching), self-determination, confidence, independent-minded, devotion to teaching and high levels of positive energy (Collins & Amabile, 1999;Csikszentmihalyi, 1990;Horng et al., 2005;Lily & Bramwell, 2004). When teachers are motivated by their passion, love and genuine interest to facilitate students learning as well as satisfaction for their work, they continuously get inspired and motivated. ...
Thesis
Full-text available
This is an exploratory qualitative study of 17 in-service teacher trainees undertaking a Master of Arts Education (Sandwich) programme at the University of Ghana, aimed at designing a conceptual paradigm for creative pedagogy within the context of study. The phenomenographic method was used in the collection and analysis of data by identifying categories of description pertaining to the understanding and experiences of the phenomenon of creative pedagogy by participants. Among the key findings of the study are that; factors such as the content of the study programme, mode of delivery by teacher educators and influence of teacher educators heightened the perception of trainees of teaching as a creative practice; there were transformations in the learning experiences of both students and teachers as a result of creative and improved ways of teaching by trainees following their exposure and training on the MA Education programme; and that, participant teacher trainees were found to be intrinsically motivated as they teach creatively and for creativity. In addition, the study revealed that creative pedagogical methods and strategies cut across subject domains and levels of the school system and when these methods are enabled by favourable environments, they lead to creative teaching and learning outcomes. Based on the empirical evidence from the study, the researcher designed a proposed four-component theoretical paradigm of creative pedagogy with an emphasis on the indispensability of training of teachers for creativity. It is recommended that the training and practice of creative pedagogy would be anchored on a socio-cultural ethos of creativity.
... Previous studies provide a series of characteristics of the creative teacher that are part of the Creative Potential dimension (Runco, 2009) such as: (a) self-confidence, persistence and sense of humor (Horng et al., 2005); (b) takes reasonable risks and encourages unpredictable situations (Oreck, 2006); (c) is adaptable and respects the individualities of the student (Anderson, 2002); (d) is autonomous and promotes autonomy (Rinkevich, 2011;Morais & Azevedo, 2011); (e) stimulates the production of ideas and seeks new knowledge (Diakidoy & Kanari, 1999); (f ) is aware of the characteristics that promote student creativity (De Souza, 2000); (g) is tolerant of ambiguity, critical of his practice, and demonstrates creative abilities (Fautley & Savage, 2007). However, the Creative Performance dimension (Runco, 2009) shows more objective and concrete criteria of creative thinking (Product and Persuasion). ...
... On the other hand, studies affirm that the creative teacher demonstrates self-confidence to be different, be persistent, and take reasonable risks to promote unpredictable situations in the classroom (Horng et al., 2005;Oreck, 2006). However, it is worth highlighting the effect of creative-innovative performance on pedagogical practice. ...
Article
Full-text available
The relationship between dispositions towards critical thinking, creative-innovative performance, self-efficacy and teaching practice was assessed in Peruvian teacher trainers from the Amazonian region of San Martin. Direct and big relationships were found between all variables. A model that explained 42% of the variance of teaching practice is presented, where dispositions towards critical thinking and creative and innovative performance have a direct effect on teacher self-efficacy. In addition, teacher self-efficacy fully mediates the relationship between dispositions toward critical thinking, and partially mediates the relationship between creative-innovative performance and teaching practices. Likewise, results show differences according to sex, work experience, specialization and work place. It is suggested to include other actors to get a holistic view of the teachers’ trainer capacities.
... The SLA theory, which postulates that students can effectively acquire English if they are given significant exposure to the language, merely considers the quantity of the language given to students (Krashen, 1982, as cited in Wu, 2018. However, the quality aspect of English teaching should be considered as well (Horng, Hong, ChanLin, Chang, & Chu, 2005). Giving students significant exposure to the language is not the only issue, but also involves the ways in which teachers find creative and appropriate ways to help students that are having difficulties in understanding the given learning materials (Horng et al., 2005). ...
... However, the quality aspect of English teaching should be considered as well (Horng, Hong, ChanLin, Chang, & Chu, 2005). Giving students significant exposure to the language is not the only issue, but also involves the ways in which teachers find creative and appropriate ways to help students that are having difficulties in understanding the given learning materials (Horng et al., 2005). ...
Article
Full-text available
This study explores the teachers’ perceptions of using the first language (L1) when teaching English. The conceptual work of literature review is applied as the research method. This means previous works were analysed to investigate teachers’ perceptions toward the L1 use in teaching English. The result shows that the L1 can be used in teaching grammar, vocabulary, and giving instructions. Teachers are also divided into three positions in perceiving the use of L1 in teaching English, which are the virtual, maximal, and optimal position. Therefore, teachers might use this study’s results as the information to use the L1 in classrooms. This may also be beneficial for Indonesian educational stakeholders and the government to specifically define the use of L1 in teaching English.
... At the same time the environment of learning is crucial in supporting creativity and the idea that creativity practiced in higher education is deeply situated. Scientists have discovered that learning motivated by passion, cooperation in creating and the atmosphere, which is conducive of supporting certain values, and where mistakes are seen as parts of the process of teaching, reinforce creativity (Horng et al., 2005). A course in creativity may improve the level of creativity in participants and the value which they assign to it (Dewett & Gruys, 2007;Fischer et al., 2016). ...
... There are numerous inspiring research cases and analyses referring to creative teaching. Horng et al. (2005) investigated factors which influence creative thinking and analysed the effectiveness of strategies used by the selected teachers. The most important factor turned out to be the belief in the point of teaching as such, hard work and students` motivation. ...
Article
The relationships between creativity and tourism are commonly discussed. The article, rooted in the experience of post-soviet countries, presents an experiment carried out within the course “Creativity in tourism” at the University of Łódź, Poland. The objective was to perform two psychometric tests to verify the level of students’ creativity: Test of Creative Imagination and “Creative versus Imitative Attitude Scale Test”. The aim was to answer the research question: may the introduction of the element(s) of creative pedagogy impact creativity of students. The main objective of this paper is to prove the necessity of taking similar actions and including methods and tools from the creative pedagogy framework in teaching processes at the academic level. The students achieved a high increase of fluent thinking. The high rate of the course given by the students may encourage looking for new solutions within the scope of stimulating creativity. The experiment thus constitutes an example of the introduction of a subject satisfying the needs of a dynamic job market and tourism into the academic teaching program.
... Among the various factors affecting teachers' competency to guide students to think creatively, teachers' personality traits, family factors, background and learning experiences, peer interaction, beliefs regarding education, devotion to creative instruction, motivation, and organizational environment are some of the prominent ones (Horng, Hong, ChanLin, Chang, & Chu, 2005). In addition to these traits, another factor is 'disposition' which can be defined as the tendency of a person to do something. ...
... Learning outcomes are the result of a teacher's personal characteristics, his/her pedagogical skills, and the environment in which s/ he operates (Bramwell, Reilly, Lilly, Kronish, & Chennabathni, 2011;Chan & Yuen, 2014). Horng et al. (2005) suggested that, in order to be able to raise creative teachers, creative instruction should begin with teacher-training programs at universities. Teachers should be equipped with the knowledge and strategies of creative instruction, while stirring learners' motivation. ...
Article
The purpose of this research is to gather data on how often teachers use creative thinking techniques and encourage students to use such techniques. For this purpose, a valid and reliable scale for guiding creative thinking competency was developed. A survey model is used in the research and it consists of participants working as elementary school teachers in the province of Istanbul. This research was carried out on four different samples in total 815 people. In analyzing the data SPSS 21.0 and LISREL software’s were used. It is found that there is a positive relationship between teachers’ competency of guiding creative thinking and teachers’ own creative thinking dispositions. The competency to guide creative thinking is higher in the case of elementary school teachers who specialize in teaching gifted students than the elementary school teachers of general education. In conclusion, scale for creative thinking competency demonstrated a strong factor structure, strong internal consistency and evidence for construct and concurrent validity.
... Moreover, teachers' personal and behavioral factors are seen as key to promote creativity in the classroom (Horng, Hong, ChanLin, Chang, & Chu, 2005;Rubenstein, Ridgley, Callan, Karami, & Ehlinger, 2018). ...
... The most influential factors for Estonian teachers that are associated with their creative self-efficacy are their general self-esteem and societal value. This result is in line with the findings of Horng et al. (2005) that teachers' self-confidence is a key factor for the development of teachers' positive perceptions and performance of teaching for creativity. ...
Article
Full-text available
Context . Teachers’ creative self-efficacy (CSE), or personal beliefs about one’s own abilities to recognize and produce creative outcomes, is believed to be one of the factors that support creativity in the classroom and is connected to general self-esteem. Objectives and design . In the present paper, two studies were conducted to map Estonian teachers’ CSE and the factors, beliefs and attitudes towards creativity that are related to it, as well as how teachers transfer their CSE into their everyday activities in the classroom. In the first study, Estonian adaptation of Rubenstein et al. (2013) Teaching for Creativity Scales and Rosenberg Self-Esteem Scale (Pullmann & Allik, 2000) were used. The second study was based on a qualitative analysis, using in-service teachers’ self-reports focusing on their teaching practices. Main outcomes . As a result of both studies, a framework for understanding teachers’ CSE is proposed, where self-esteem and perceived societal value of creativity are associated with the manifestation of CSE in the classroom, which in turn transfers into enhancing creativity through teaching for creativity and creative teaching.
... It is indeed that teachers are required to be creative in teaching and learning process (Suwartono & Oktavia, 2019). Creative teachers adapt, create and evaluate ideas for their own teaching strategy (Horng et al., 2005). These teachers, who are creative, also bring out creativity among the students they teach. ...
... Creative teaching is the process leading to creative learning through the implementation of new methods, tools and content which stimulate learners' creative potential. Horng et al., (2005) state that creative learners need creative teachers. They also emphasize that creative teachers are those who are willing to create creative environment and encourage the students to be creative in the class. ...
Article
Full-text available
Teaching English to young learners is not an easy task. Teacher needs to use appropriate learning strategies so the students are engaged and motivated in teaching and learning process. The current study aimed at identifying the teaching English strategies used by fifth grade English teacher and the problems encountered by teacher in teaching English for young learner. This study was a descriptive qualitative research and conducted in SD Suta Dharma Denpasar Bali. In collecting the data, classroom observation and interview were conducted. The result showed that there were eight strategies applied by teacher in teaching English. They are; listen and repeat, listen and do, question and answer, in-pair, cooperative learning, and games. Furthermore, the problems experienced by teacher were lack of media of teaching English and lack of knowledge of strategy in TEYL. The problems occurred because the teacher has a limited knowledge on how to teach English for young learners and the lack of resources of teaching media available in school.
... In general, creating a better environment, for both the instructors and the students. Horng et al. (2005) in their study on three award-winning teachers reported that creative teaching improved student performance and promoted development of creative thinking among students. One of the effective teaching strategies of the award-winning teachers that Horng et al. (2005) mentioned was the use of technology for teaching. ...
... Horng et al. (2005) in their study on three award-winning teachers reported that creative teaching improved student performance and promoted development of creative thinking among students. One of the effective teaching strategies of the award-winning teachers that Horng et al. (2005) mentioned was the use of technology for teaching. Learning through technology can also influence creative learning based on the tripartite process including the instructor, the student, and the technology (Shabalina et al., 2016). ...
Thesis
Full-text available
This study looks at instructors perceptions of blended learning (BL) at a Medical School (MS) in one of the Gulf Cooperation Council (GCC) countries. The study also looks at the effects of instructors perceptions on implementation of BL in the classroom. And the effect of student perspectives on instructors perceptions of BL. The study is important as it looks into the impact and effectiveness of technology in the classroom, from an instructor's perspective in the GCC. The study also captures how an instructors' experiences with technology effect their practice in the classroom. The target populations of the study are eight instructors and five students. Data analysis starts with narratives of each instructor to give the reader an idea of their background, and technology usage preferences.
... Only when teachers are willing to create, will students feel unrestrained and encouraged to be creative in class." (Horng, at al, 2005, p. 355) Livingstone (2010) claims that "Human beings are inherently creative." On the other hand Esquivel raised a question and partly answers it: 'Can creativity be learned?' ...
... Everyone bears the potential for creativity." (Horng, at al, 2005, p. 355) "They come to school with a life history of creativity, whether it is manifested in the use of the Internet, various extracurricular pursuits, or even, occasionally, the classroom. Hence, we need not fret over how to encourage creative behavior in our schools. ...
Article
The author deals with a topic quite often discussed by not only pedagogy and psychology. Creativity is present everywhere and the author suggests it should be a part of University education preparing pre-service teachers. Even though there are researches proving that creativity can be learnt and developed (to certain extent) it is still missing at our schools. Students and pupils still claim that they are asked to memorize the facts rather than to discuss their own opinions and perception.The study briefly presents part of the data gained in the research focused on using creativity at elementary and secondary schools. The interview with 22 teachers was done in 2 sessions (10 and 12 teachers to manage to administer the responses).
... The fact that the skills expected from individuals in the 21st century are more complex and variable in structure compared to the previous century, brings about the change of the methods used in measuring and evaluating these skills. Because creative writing does not fit into a fenced area or a pattern; It is the process of combining emotions and thoughts with imagination and transferring to the article in a subjective way (Horng, Hong & Chanlin, 2005;Oral, 2014) and in order for this process to take place, students need tasks in which they can use their creativity and bring their feelings and thoughts together. Measurement of creativity or aesthetic success can produce biased results with tasks that are limited and clearly seen what individuals expect from them. ...
... Referring to such conditions are needed creative teachers in history learning. creative teachers were the teachers who can foster the creativity of their students and who were inspired [4]. emphasized more on teachers who can develop the talents of their students. ...
... The tendency to acquire new skills and knowledge and to integrate it into the existing work systems, encourage academic staffs to act creatively in order to make use of what they have learned. According to Horng et al. (2005), the learning motivation is a good seed for generation of novel ideas. This is because learning is a dialectical process that comprises both access to new knowledge and the ability to integrate such new knowledge into current knowledge sets (Baum et al., 2011). ...
Article
Full-text available
Underpinned by the broaden-and-build theory of positive emotions, this study posited that high level of work engagement will encourage academicians' innovative work behavior (IWB) through learning goal orientation (LGO). The mediating role of LGO in the work engagement and IWB relationship was also examined. Data were gathered through questionnaire survey completed by 265 academic staff from six public universities located in the northern and central regions of Peninsular Malaysia. The results indicated that academic staff members who are highly engaged at work would be more likely to exhibit a higher level of LGO, which ultimately tend to engage in IWB. Discussions enlighten LGO as a significant mediator in explicating the work engagement and IWB link, which provided full support to the underlying theory. Finally, practical ramifications and limitations of this study are also brought to fore.
... Lakhal et al., 2020) have revealed that the effects of e-learning on the student's learning experience are moderated by various features, such as academic-and social integration, pedagogical strategies used, or the attitudes of face-to-face students towards online students. Regardless of the growing valorization of creative thinking and creativity-relevant skills within the knowledge economy (Horng et al., 2005), as well as the recognition of the impact of school education and teacher behavior on the cultivation of students' creative potential (Yeh & Wu, 2006), little research has been performed on how creative teaching practices affect knowledge acquisition and learning satisfaction in conventional classroom environments and in blended learning. ...
Chapter
Full-text available
As a first response to the COVID-19 pandemic, Luxembourg, like many other countries, chose a strategy of minimised physical and social contacts. The educational system implemented these measures by introducing quick changes in their teaching modalities. At the onset of the lockdown in spring 2020, the University of Luxembourg, unlike other higher-education institutions, has managed to rapidly transition to exclusive remote teaching for all offered study programs. There are good reasons to believe that the rapid change in teaching modalities in addition to the manifold challenges surrounding the Coronavirus pandemic have had an impact on the University students’ learning satisfaction, personal wellbeing, and mental health, and possibly even affected their educational outcomes.
... For example, Lee and Kemple (2014) argued that teachers' self-creative traits might influence their creativityenhancing behaviors while teaching students. One possible claim showed that more innovative teachers were more likely to promote creative instruction (Horng et al., 2005). In this regard, personal innovativeness can be considered a significant factor that influences teachers' intentions to implement creative pedagogy in making activities. ...
Article
“Making” has its origin in the maker movement, emphasizes novel, innovative creations by adopting applicable technologies, and fosters students’ creativity or encourages them to engage in creative thinking in school-based making activities, in which teachers act as a facilitator for the implementation of creative pedagogy. This study constructed a hypothesized model based on the theory of planned behavior and incorporated pedagogical beliefs, personal innovativeness, peer influence, and facilitating conditions to predict teachers’ perceptions regarding the perceived implementation of creative pedagogy in making activities. Questionnaires were obtained from 68 Chinese teachers with maker instruction experience and were tested against the proposed model by partial least squares structural equation modeling. The findings reveal that teachers’ attitudes and subjective norms had positive impacts on their intentions to implement creative pedagogy. Pedagogical beliefs and personal innovativeness showed a significant impact on their attitudes, while peer influence exerted a significant influence on subjective norms.
... By these potentials, students will be involved and will be accustomed to think creatively, decide something different, and choose the best from various choices. That is why creativity is also interpreted as the ability to determine new relationships, see the subject from a new perspective, and determine new combinations of two or more concepts that have been printed in mind [6], [7]. ...
... § Gilbert (1992) recommended relating, imagination, brainstorming, organization, analogy and metaphor and re-conception to establish creativity. § Horng, Hong, Chanlin, Chang and Chu (2005) mentioned that student-centered activities, forming connections between teaching content and real-life, asking open-ended questions, using technology and multimedia and real-life experiences enhances creative thinking. § Kind and Kind (2007) asserted that open inquiry, creative problem-solving, creative writing, forming metaphor and analogy practices can be useful for encouraging creativity. ...
Article
Full-text available
This study aims to unify the effect size of experimental studies that were carried out to determine the effect of teaching strategies, methods and techniques on creative thinking skills, and to find out whether this effect size was of significant differences for certain variables. A meta-analysis of 19 studies investigating the effect of teaching strategies, methods and techniques published between 2005-2019 on students' creative thinking skills was conducted. The study results revealed that teaching possessed a moderate effect on students’ creative thinking skills varying considerably based on the grades the study group and the discipline dealt with in the study yet no meaningful difference in terms of the country it was carried at and no experimental effect for the applied teaching strategies, methods and techniques.
... Rather, a pedagogy that actively models creativity, innovation, and risk-taking simultaneously teaches students the very essence of said principles, regardless of the subject matter. Horng, Hong, ChanLin, Chang, & Chu (2005) refer to personality traits commensurate with "teacher creativity": persistence, self-confidence and a sense of humor. Lin (2011) refers to teacher ethos as "maintaining an open attitude toward creative ideas or behaviors, showing a humanistic pupil control ideology (as opposed to being authoritarian), being flexible and valuing independence thinking" (p. ...
Article
Full-text available
This paper considers the complex and somewhat nebulous term “creativity”, exploring the ways in which the pedagogical phenomenon we call “CIRT” (an acronym) can enrich classroom approaches so as to enhance Creativity, boost Innovation, and encourage Risk-Taking. In addition, we review elements that impact the creative process and explore concepts of freedom, as well as the constraints and parameters of creativity. In our role as teacher educators, we explore the connection between teaching and creativity by outlining three key examples of approaches that utilize the CIRT framework including: synesthesia, imagination, and audiation activities. Cho, C. L, & Vitale, J. L. (2019). Using the arts to develop a pedagogy of creativity, innovation, and risk-taking (CIRT). Journal for Learning through the Arts, 15(1). http://dx.doi.org/10.21977/D915130132
... Also, TASC learning model was affirmed to be successful in developing creativity among gifted students [27]. In addition, Creative Learning Principle (CLP) was used in the curriculum of art and drawing course [25] [28]. ...
Article
Full-text available
The learning process addresses to achieve high and desirable conceptual understanding and application. However, in basic graphic design lesson, not all the available learning strategies could be used to achieve significant conceptual understanding and application. Creative learning assisted by Instagram social media and project-based learning are two available learning approaches that are suitable to improve conceptual understanding and application. This research aims at examining the interaction influence of learning models assisted by Instagram social media and the user experiences towards conceptual understanding and application on basic graphic design subject. This research employed quantitative research approach using quasi-experimental non-equivalent control group design. The subject of this research was 146 students of Vocational High School (VHS) which consisted of four classes. The data analysis was using MANOVA through SPSS 24.0. The results confirm that there is an interaction influence of learning models assisted by Instagram social media and the user experiences towards conceptual understanding and application learning outcomes. The findings also affirm that to increase conceptual understanding among students with high and low user experiences, creative learning model assisted by Instagram social media. Meanwhile, to achieve conceptual application among high user experience students, project-based learning assisted by Instagram social media is the most suitable learning model and to achieve conceptual application among low user experience students, creative learning assisted by Instagram social media is the most suitable one.
... Correlation between creative self-efficacy and creative professional behaviour and performance have been widely reported for various occupations, including teaching (Alzoubi, Al Qudah, Albursan, Bakhiet & Abduljabbar, 2016;Carmeli & Schaubroeck, 2007;Choi, 2004 ;Chuang, Shiu & Cheng, 2010;Jaussi, Randel & Dionne, 2007;Liu & Wu, 2011;Mathisen & Bronnick, 2009;Phelan, 2001;Tierney & Farmer, 2002;Walumbwa, Christensen-Salem, Hsu & Misati, 2018). Particularly, it was reported that teachers' creative self-efficacy has an impact on their creative teaching performance (Cayirdag, 2017;Horng, Hong, ChanLin, Chang & Chu, 2005;Liu & Wang, 2019;Ucus & Acar, 2018). What is promising is that creative self-efficacy can be developed by training (Alzoubi et al., 2016;Mathisen & Bronnick, 2009) and 'increases in creative self-efficacy corresponded with increases in creative performance as well' (Tierney & Farmer, 2011, p. 277). ...
Article
Full-text available
The purpose of this study was to develop a Turkish version of the Creative Self-Efficacy Scale (CSES) and to explore its psychometric properties. Participants were 489 preservice teachers enrolled in a public university in Turkey (n = 489). Two-hundred-thirty-five of 489 preservice teachers (48.06%) participated in the first study for the exploratory factor analysis (EFA), and 254 (51.94%) participated in the second study for the confirmatory factor analysis. Two-hundred-sixty (53.2%) of the participants were studying in preschool teaching and 132 (46.8%) were studying in classroom teaching programs. CSES, which is a 3-item Likert-type English questionnaire, was translated into Turkish by the researcher. Eight researchers who were expert in Turkish education, English language teaching, educational measurement and evaluation, elementary education and educational technology fields participated in the back-translation and expert review processes. Scale scores did not differ according to sex, age, grade or department of the respondent. However, creative self-efficacy was observed to be related to design self-efficacy.
... Yaratıcı düşünme becerilerinin sınıf içi etkinlikler yoluyla geliştirilmesi konusunda etkinliklerin seçiminde gerçek yaşam ile bağlantı kurulmasının önemine dikkat çekilmiştir (Horng, Hong, ChanLin, Chang & Chu, 2005). Bu sebeple bu çalışmada program kapsamında yer alan çocuk edebiyatı metinlerinin kültüre özgü anlatılar içermesine özen gösterilmiştir. ...
... Furthermore, teachers' persistence, willingness to develop, acceptance of new experiences, motivation, and sense of humor were found as decisive factors influencing creative teaching (Horng, Hong, ChanLin, Chang, & Chu, 2005). In addition, the school environment, including other teachers, the principal, other school students, and school administration policies, affect teachers' creativity (Palaniappan, 2009). ...
Article
Full-text available
Development of students' creativity has been a prerequisite for the survival in this fast-changing technological age. Enhancement of learners' higher-order thinking skills should be the main concern of education systems around the world. Therefore, the present study aims to survey EFL teachers' knowledge about creative thinking, the activities they practice to enhance creative thinking skills. It also aims to understand EFL teachers' perceptions about the importance of creative thinking activities in promoting EFL learners' creativity. Moreover, it aims to check if there are significant differences between participants' perceptions due to teaching experience and stage. A total of 56 teachers took part in the present study through responding to a questionnaire developed to achieve the aims. Results revealed EFL teachers' lack of knowledge of creative thinking skills. Nevertheless, they showed that they "Often" practice creative thinking activities in classroom. Results also indicated that these activities were perceived "Important" for the enhancement of EFL learners' creative thinking skills.
... There are a number of factors that may influence a teacher's ability to teach creativity. Personality, thinking style, career experiences, teacher knowledge, and environmental factors most likely play a role in an instructor's capacity to teach creativity (Horng et al., 2005). Of the factors that influence a teacher's ability to teach creativity, creative pedagogy is the most likely to be improvable. ...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
Creative thinking in design is a focus of PK-12 technology and engineering education. Pre-service STEM teachers from The College of New Jersey in the United States of America are required to take a course, Creative Design, as an integral part of their degree sequence. Additionally, Creative Design is a liberal learning course which fulfills a Literary, Visual, and Performing Arts requirement, and is therefore open to all students. The course is extremely popular, with approximately nine sections running each semester. Originally conceived in the 1960's, topics covered in Creative Design include the design process, design thinking, technical drawing, design elements and principles, and human factors engineering (ergonomics). This study adopted a qualitative research design to explore if and how instructors of Creative Design employ creative pedagogy. The research question driving this inquiry was; how and in what ways are instructors of Creative Design using creative pedagogy in their classrooms? Four Creative Design instructors from The College of New Jersey were interviewed for this study. Open-ended questions allowed for deeper exploration of participants' views and opinions. Thematic analysis was used to generate themes and gain a holistic understanding of participants' use of creative pedagogy. Themes emerged such as open-ended problems, collaboration, and creative self-efficacy that were well aligned with research-based practices in design education.
... Guru boleh menjalankan ALPdP dalam talian dengan menetapkan tarikh dan masa pelaksanaan aktiviti bersesuaian contohnya aktiviti menanam pokok, pertandingan pakaian tradisional, menzahirkan perasaan tentang keadaan semasa, kepentingan murid memberikan kerjasama sepenuhnya kepada pihak berkuasa dalam menangani penularan Covid-19, dan sebagainya. Sentuhan guru dan kesedaran yang dipupuk penting agar murid dapat memahami keadaan semasa dan bertindak sebagai warganegara bertanggungjawab (Sumintono, Tahir & Rahman, 2012;Horng et al., 2005;dan Balakrishnan, 2020). ...
Article
Full-text available
ABSTRAKSI: Artikel ini mengupas rasional di sebalik pengenalan ALPdP (Aktiviti di Luar waktu Pengajaran dan Pembelajaran) Pendidikan Moral di Malaysia. Seramai tujuh orang peserta kajian, yang terdiri daripada guru Pendidikan Moral daripada enam buah sekolah, telah terlibat secara langsung dalam kajian ini. Kaedah kualitatif dengan menggunakan reka bentuk kajian kes telah digunakan dalam pengumpulan data. Dapatan data bagi kajian ini dikutip melalui temu bual, pemerhatian, dan penelitian dokumen. Dapatan kajian menunjukkan bahawa silibus baharu Pendidikan Moral, iaitu KSSM (Kurikulum Standard Sekolah Menengah), bukan sahaja diajar di dalam kelas malah diselitkan juga dengan pengajaran dan pembelajaran di luar waktu dan dijalankan oleh guru di luar bilik darjah selama 32 jam. ALPdP merupakan komponen baharu dan telah mula dilaksanakan dalam kalangan murid Pendidikan Moral menengah rendah bermula tahun 2017. Penambahbaikan secara berterusan perlu diberi perhatian oleh pihak Kementerian Pendidikan Malaysia agar keberkesanan ALPdP ini dapat dimantapkan dan menjadi proses pengajaran dan pembelajaran yang bermakna kepada murid. KATA KUNCI: Kurikulum Standard Sekolah Menengah; Aktiviti di Luar Waktu Pengajaran dan Pembelajaran; Pendidikan Moral di Malaysia. ABSTRACT: “Moral Education Activities Beyond Teaching and Learning in Malaysia: An Introduction”. This article explores the rationale behind the introduction of TLAOC (Teaching and Learning Activities Outside the Classroom) in Malaysia. A total of seven study participants consisting of Moral Education teachers from six schools were directly involved in this study. Qualitative methods using case study design have been used in data collection. The data obtained for this study were collected through one-to-one interviews, observation, and documents reviews. The results show that the new syllabus of Moral Education, the SCSS (Standard Curriculum for Secondary School), is not only taught in the classroom but is also integrated with teaching and learning outside of the classroom and conducted by teachers for 32 hours. The TLAOC is a new component that has been implemented among lower secondary Moral Education students beginning in 2017. Continuous improvement needs to be given attention by the Ministry of Education Malaysia, so that the effectiveness of TLAOC can be strengthened and become a meaningful teaching and learning process for students. KEY WORD: Standard Curriculum for Secondary School; Teaching and Learning Activities Outside the Classroom; Moral Education in Malaysia. About the Austhors: Vijaya Malani Verasamy ialah Pelajar Sarjana (Master) di Jabatan Asas Pendidikan dan Kemanusiaan, Fakulti Pendidikan UM (Universiti Malaya), Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia. Vishalache Balakrishnan, Ph.D. ialah Profesor Madya di Jabatan Asas Pendidikan dan Kemanusiaan, Fakulti Pendidikan UM, Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia. Bagi urusan sebarang akademik, Penulis boleh dihubungi secara terus melalui emel di: vee1810@gmail.com dan visha@um.edu.mySuggested Citation: Verasamy, Vijaya Malani Vishalache Balakrishnan. (2020). “Aktiviti di Luar Waktu Pengajaran dan Pembelajaran Pendidikan Moral di Malaysia: Satu Pengenalan” in MIMBAR PENDIDIKAN: Jurnal Indonesia untuk Kajian Pendidikan, Volume 5(2), September, pp.131-142. Bandung, Indonesia: UPI [Indonesia University of Education] Press, ISSN 2527-3868 (print) and 2503-457X (online). Article Timeline: Accepted (July 27, 2020); Revised (August 31, 2020); and Published (September 30, 2020).
... In-service and pre-service teachers perceive sense of humor as an important factor that a teacher should possess (Teachout, 1997). Similarly, in a qualitative study where three teachers awarded in creative teaching were observed, use of humor was highlighted as a very important skill of highly creative teachers (Horng et al., 2005). Moreover, openness to experience, which is a "Big Five" personality trait, and which is associated with aesthetic and creative interests and greater engagement with music (Thomas et al., 2016), is reported to be correlated with both affiliative and self-enhancing humor. ...
Article
Learning and performing music affect the brain and cognition and have a positive impact on emotional states. Negative emotional states such as stress, anxiety, and depression are harmful for teaching. Alternative certification teachers in particular are extremely vulnerable to and suffer greatly from negative emotional states. In addition, humor and coping humor are cognitive processes depending on neural networks of the brain. Therefore, the relationships between alternative certification pre-service teachers’ musical behaviors, negative emotional states, humor styles, and coping humor were examined in order to produce knowledge that can be used to increase effectiveness in education regarding negative emotional states, humor styles, and humor. The participants were 112 pre-service teachers enrolled in the alternative certification program of a public university in Turkey ( N = 112). Responses to six psychometric scales and a musical behaviors questionnaire were collected. Results demonstrated that having music and instrument education, duration of those educations, playing a musical instrument, and being member of a musical group were related to various emotional states, humor styles, and coping humor. The findings obtained from the analyses of the relationships between 11 musical variables and negative emotional states, humor styles, and coping humor are discussed in light of the related literature.
... Discussions are used to better focus on huge groups of people. Problem-solving sessions, collaborative small groups, games, case studies, roleplaying, and other practices that require students to put what they have learned into practice are examples of active learning [29], which is one of the most acceptable and effective teaching strategies. Along with the mentioned strategies, cooperative learning and distance learning are also very popular. ...
Article
Full-text available
Peer observation demands the teaching community to observe each other’s teaching practice followed in classrooms and to learn from it. It focuses on individual requirements and learning by receiving and providing constructive feedback. This study gives detailed information about the purpose and principle of peer observation along with the steps followed in the peer observation cycle. The data gathered are from postobservation forms and meetings. Feedback from peers is used to demonstrate the importance of peer observation in improving the overall teaching experience. The results indicated that there is a significant improvement in the teaching style of the instructors. The category of attaining student attention and engagement grew by 28.8 percent, while the category of students demonstrating passion and motivation climbed by 15.27 percent. Peer observation is seen as a beneficial tool for teachers’ professional development. Teachers stated that peer observation reduced their worry, hesitancy, and pressure throughout the teaching process, making it more dependable and real. However, participants identified time constraints and teachers’ lack of observation expertise as barriers to peer observation.
... For example during class discussions, teachers' improvisation and innovation should be able to facilitate students to build their knowledge. The character of creative teaching is also seen in the teaching selection strategy, namely (a) student-centered learning, (b) varied teaching strategies, (c) classroom management that facilitates diversity and potential of students, (d) teaching that is contextual to everyday life, and (e) accustom students to think critically through question and answer as well as discussion (Horng et al., 2005). According to Jeffrey (2006) creative teaching is also characterized by the relevance of teaching content to the needs and potential of students, including innovation in the presentation of the learning content. ...
... Therefore, the teachers' attitude was positive toward using the proposed tool. Studies have also emphasized the quality of teacher performance, developing his abilities, and creating standard learning environments to obtain a better understanding of the classroom (Darling-Hammond, 2000;Kember, 2000;Fasko, 2001;Horng et al., 2005). It is consistent with this research objective in improving the internal educational environment in the classroom and controlling the way of learning to achieve the desired goals. ...
Article
The educational process depends on many procedures, which lead to positive educational outcomes. The research depends on modern technology in the design and development of an electronic tool that manages the teaching process in the classroom from beginning to end. The purpose of the research is to monitor the teacher's procedures by following up on all teaching procedures using an electronic tool for managing the educational process. The teacher implemented all educational lesson procedures in the classroom through the proposed electronic tool according to its prior preparation. The researcher designed a cognitive achievement test for students of the experimental and control groups to measure the effectiveness of the electronic tool. An attitude scale was applied to teachers to identify their attitude toward using the tool in monitoring procedures in the classroom to ensure the effectiveness of the proposed electronic tool in developing the educational process and enriching the academic situation. The research's results indicated that using the proposed electronic tool improved students' educational achievement by comparing the students' results in the experimental and control groups. The teachers' attitude toward using the tool was also characterized as favorable and desired. The research recommended applying the proposed electronic tool to a more significant number of teachers in different specializations, using the tool reports in overcoming problems in the classroom, and conducting more studies related to performance follow-up and observation in the classroom.
... Thus, effectively integrating creativity into the science curriculum would require rapid testing and conclusive results . Teachers would also require sufficient tools to (1) understand test results, (2) draw links between the results and beneficial changes in science teaching and classroom setup, and (3) implement the findings in a way that effectively fosters creativity (Horng et al., 2005). That is, measuring changes in students' creativity and reading how to nurture this creativity help teachers to redesign their lessons, adapt the classroom environment to their students' various needs, and, finally, encourage individual scientific creativity (Südkamp et al., ...
Thesis
Bilingualer Unterricht ist mit großen Hoffnungen für die Verbesserung englischer Sprachkompetenz verbunden, ohne die Lehrpläne durch zusätzlichen Fremdsprachenunterricht weiter zu überladen. Denn fließendes Englisch ist in beinahe allen akademischen und nicht akademischen Berufen Grundvoraussetzung. Neben müheloser Kommunikation in englischer Alltagssprache wird insbesondere disziplinbezogene Fachsprachlichkeit erwartet. Diese Fachsprachlichkeit ist jedoch stark kontextbezogen und kann nur innerhalb authentischer, disziplin- spezifischer Lernsituationen gefördert werden. Zusätzlich zur Sprachkompetenz wird auch inhaltlich verstärkt auf Kompetenzen gesetzt. Entsprechende Anpassungen des Lehrplans und damit einhergehende innovative Unterrichtskonzepte sollen kompetenzorientiertes Lernen ermöglichen. Entsprechend müssen Module entworfen werden, die eine Selbstkonzept stärkende, Kreativität fördernde, Lernerfolg steigernde und natürlichen Spracherwerb verbessernde Lernumgebung unterstützen. Eine Möglichkeit für den naturwissenschaftlichen Unterricht stellen eintägige Experimentierlabore mit bilingualem Lernangebot dar. Bestehende Referenzen zu diesen Modulen sind jedoch rar, da sich der Großteil der Literatur über Kombinationen von Naturwissenschaften mit Content and Language Integrated Learning (CLIL) ausschließlich auf CLIL-Module in Langzeitform fokussiert. Vor diesem Hintergrund wurde in der vorliegenden Arbeit ein ursprünglich muttersprachlich deutsches Modul zu einem bilingual englischen Bio- /Gentechnik Modul weiterentwickelt. Hierfür wurde ich der vorliegenden Arbeit der Unterschied zwischen einem Moduldesign mit nur einer oder zwei Modellevaluationsphasen untersucht. Ferner ergründete die Arbeit das Zusammenspiel zwischen Persönlichkeitsvariablen und Kreativität in einem quantitativen Verfahren. Dabei wurden altersspezifische Geschlechterunterschiede in den Kreativitätsvariablen Act und Flow-Erleben beim Vergleich von Extremgruppen deutlich sowie Zusammenhänge zwischen Flow und Persönlichkeitsvariablen. Beim Vergleich des Lernerfolgs zwischen Schülergruppen des muttersprachlich deutschen und des bilingual englischen Moduls in konnte gezeigt werden, dass die Schüler des muttersprachlich deutschen Moduls besser abschnitten. Ähnliche Ergebnisse konnten bezüglich des Einflusses von CLIL auf Modellwissen in einem erzielt werden. Jedoch bewiesen sich die Schüler des bilingual englischen Moduls bei Fragen und Aufgaben, die Tiefenverständnis erforderten. Die Untersuchung des Einflusses von CLIL auf englischen Spracherwerb zeigte, dass die Schüler durch Teilnahme am Modul ihre englischen Sprachkompetenzen verbesserten. In der Literatur allgemein postulierte Geschlechterunterschiede wurden nicht bestätigt. Dafür konnte ein rapides Absinken der zunächst im Cloze-Test gemessenen Sprachkompetenzen im Behaltenstest festgestellt werden. Eine mögliche Erklärung für dieses Phänomen ist der Wechsel auf Distanzunterricht im Zuge der COVID-19-Beschränkungen. Der Einfluss von Hands-on-Minds-on-Aktivitäten und CLIL auf Kreativität und Selbstkonzept erwies, dass die Skalen von Kreativität und Selbstkonzept miteinander korrelieren und somit in einer ähnlichen Lernumgebung gefördert werden können. Außerdem wurde die in der Literatur geschilderte wechselseitige Beziehung zwischen Leistung und Selbstkonzept bestätigt. Geschlechterunterschiede zeigten sich nur für die Subskala Social des Selbstkonzepts. Hier nahmen sich weibliche Schüler im leistungsmäßigen Vergleich mit anderen Schülern leistungsschwächer wahr als sie tatsächlich waren und unterschieden sich damit von ihren männlichen Kollegen.
... Thus, effectively integrating creativity into the science curriculum would require rapid testing and conclusive results (Kaufman et al., 2008). Teachers would also require sufficient tools to (1) understand test results, (2) draw links between the results and beneficial changes in science teaching and classroom setup, and (3) implement the findings in a way that effectively fosters creativity (Horng et al., 2005). That is, measuring changes in students' creativity and reading how to nurture this creativity help teachers to redesign their lessons, adapt the classroom environment to their students' various needs, and, finally, encourage individual scientific creativity (Südkamp et al., 2012;Gralewski & Karwowski, 2019). ...
Article
Integrating creativity into science classes may pave the way to tapping complex scientific phenomena. Although not yet conclusively defined nor assessed using standardized measures, creativity is understood to support cognitive learning in formal and informal settings. However, the successful integration of creativity in educational modules depends on many factors. As our knowledge of how to identify these factors is still limited, teachers may have difficulties effectively monitoring and fostering creativity. Consequently, a valid means to measure creativity would help teachers to identify creativity and its influencing factors within the limited scope of science lessons. In the present study, we collected data from 538 Bavarian secondary school students (M ± SD = 16.96 ± 2.99; 65.4%, female) focussing on personality and creativity measures. Comparable to previous studies, two subscales for creativity were applied: act, comprising conscious and adaptable cognitive processes, and flow, describing a creative mental state of full immersion. Since personality is understood to be linked to creativity, we used the Big Five scale with its shortened item battery to assess personality. We found that personal characteristics such as conscientiousness and flow, openness and agreeableness, and extraversion and neuroticism were significantly correlated. Anticipated gender and age differences were only evident when extreme groups were compared: age influenced act in younger male students and flow in older female students. Drawing on the literature and our results, we suggest pedagogical approaches to provide opportunities for creativity in science classrooms.
... Furthermore, it was discovered that teachers need to explore beyond standard classroom settings and relate performance to other aspects, such as musical expression and personal life experiences, in so doing challenging and provoking students' beliefs and practices. These suggestions are in line with Horng et al. (2005) and Tan (2013) that teachers' beliefs and intrinsic motivation to nurture students to be creative draw on connections between pedagogical content and real life experiences, together with the encouragement of creative thinking. The suggestion that imagination is a crucial teacher trait also echoes the findings of Lee and Kemple (2014) that those who demonstrate higher levels of openness, both in terms of pre-existing personality types and in their views towards creativity-related experiences, tend to expose students to similar kinds of activities. ...
Article
Full-text available
Although creativity in music performance is a global issue among music educators, it has nevertheless received less attention in China. How do piano teachers in China cultivate their students’ performance creativity? This article reports on a multiple-case study undertaken in a university located in Guangzhou, China that aimed to examine the teaching strategies of three piano majors and observe their learning responses. The first author taught the students for 14 lessons within a semester, the data coming from a combination of video recordings for observation, self-reflection and semi-structured interviews. Qualitative data from the interviews and video recordings were coded based on the categories and themes that emerged from repeated observations of the video clips. The results indicate that teachers may cultivate performance creativity by nurturing students’ imaginations as it relates to individual knowledge and experience. Autonomy in musical expression should be encouraged through teaching genres other than Classical music.
... Adams-Ojugbele and Moletsane (2019) found that when children in the classroom are from diverse socio-economic backgrounds, the key indicator of a proficient educator is the ability to employ child-centred strategies for an inclusive classroom. According to Horng et al. (2005), creative Early Childhood Care and Education (ECCE) educators use a constructivist approach to learning, are able to create music and rhymes, use games, use technology and multimedia, use stories and establish a connection between the teaching content and real life. ...
Article
Full-text available
Background: Early Childhood Care and Education (ECCE) learners have unique needs, and specific pedagogies, therefore, need to be employed to support the acquisition of their essential skills. A great deal of research has been conducted on the use of music-based pedagogies to teach mathematics, life skills, civics and literacy at various levels of education. In South Africa, where ECCE is a relatively new educational sector, very little structure has been put in place to facilitate using music-based pedagogies to teach communication skills to ECCE learners. Aim: The aim of this study was to explore ECCE educators use music-based pedagogies to positively impact children’s communication skills and language development. Setting: The qualitative case study was conducted at two Urban ECCE centers in Durban, KwaZulu Natal Province, South African. Method: The study was informed by a social constructivist paradigm underpinned by Vygotsky’s sociocultural theory, focussing on ECCE learners’ interaction with the more knowledgeable other (MKO). Data were generated through semi-structured interviews and classroom observations with six educators, and through document analysis. The data were analysed using thematic analysis. Findings: The study confirmed that the ECCE educators have some levels of understanding of using music-based pedagogies as a strategy for teaching communication skills to children aged from three to four, but there are constraints. These limitations include insufficient training, a lack of musical resources and the non-inclusion of music-based pedagogies in both the pre-service teachers’ curriculum and the ECCE curriculum. Conclusions: The study recommended a comprehensive review of the content and implementation of the ECCE curriculum in relation to music pedagogy.
... Previous studies have shown that teamwork is associated with innovative behavior. According to Hong et al. (2005), increasing communication in a cooperative climate and networking between colleagues may encourage the generation of creative ideas. Successful teamwork also encourages team members to put into effect out-of-the-box methods to address work efficacy, to develop best practices, to take action to problem-solving, and to welcome changes, adopt innovations, and foster creativity (Budijanto, 2013). ...
Article
Full-text available
The Fourth Industrial Revolution (Industry 4.0) gives impetus to educational reform. Education experts have recently recognised the benefits of using technology in learning and teaching. They believe that innovations will shape Education 4.0 and that teachers will need to be prepared to build creative learning environments that support student creativity. Thus, the main purpose of this paper is to examine the relationships between teamwork, principal support, humor, and innovative work behaviour (IWB) among teachers. This study was conducted using a questionnaire, with a sample size of 354 school teachers in Malaysia. Multiple linear regression analysis has shown that teachers with high quality of teamwork and principal support were more likely to report innovative work behaviour. The findings indicated that teachers who frequently use humour can create more innovative behaviour. This paper can help managers and policymakers in the education sector, to develop a better understanding of these aspects, and their influence on teachers' innovative behaviour at work. In doing so, it would be helpful if teachers learnt effective procedures for innovative behaviour in class, via means of teamwork, humor, and principal support, to enhance their educational efforts. It is, therefore useful to establish university courses for pre-service teachers, focusing on new collaborative innovation strategies to encourage creativity and innovation in educational settings, and to apply collaborative creativity exercises in the classroom.
... Thus, effectively integrating creativity into the science curriculum would require rapid testing and conclusive results (Kaufman et al., 2008). Teachers would also require sufficient tools to (1) understand test results, (2) draw links between the results and beneficial changes in science teaching and classroom setup, and (3) implement the findings in a way that effectively fosters creativity (Horng et al., 2005). That is, measuring changes in students' creativity and reading how to nurture this creativity help teachers to redesign their lessons, adapt the classroom environment to their students' various needs, and, finally, encourage individual scientific creativity (Südkamp et al., 2012;Gralewski & Karwowski, 2019). ...
Article
Full-text available
Integrating creativity into science classes may pave the way to tapping complex scientific phenomena. Although not yet conclusively defined nor assessed using standardized measures, creativity is understood to support cognitive learning in formal and informal settings. However, the successful integration of creativity in educational modules depends on many factors. As our knowledge of how to identify these factors is still limited, teachers may have difficulties effectively monitoring and fostering creativity. Consequently, a valid means to measure creativity would help teachers to identify creativity and its influencing factors within the limited scope of science lessons. In the present study, we collected data from 538 Bavarian secondary school students (M ± SD = 16.96 ± 2.99; 65.4%, female) focussing on personality and creativity measures. Comparable to previous studies, two subscales for creativity were applied: act, comprising conscious and adaptable cognitive processes, and flow, describing a creative mental state of full immersion. Since personality is understood to be linked to creativity, we used the Big Five scale with its shortened item battery to assess personality. We found that personal characteristics such as conscientiousness and flow, openness and agreeableness, and extraversion and neuroticism were significantly correlated. Anticipated gender and age differences were only evident when extreme groups were compared: age influenced act in younger male students and flow in older female students. Drawing on the literature and our results, we suggest pedagogical approaches to provide opportunities for creativity in science classrooms.
Article
Full-text available
Training is needed to ensure that teachers acquire the knowledge necessary to teach problem-solving skills. Furthermore, a specifically designed training material such as a module is especially needed when teachers work in remote areas with fewer resources. Meanwhile, six educational problem-solving skills development needs among teachers in rural Indonesian elementary schools were identified: teacher mentoring, self-actualization, competency, creativity, problem-solving, and independence. A training module was designed based on the needs which were assessed using the CIPS model. The study aimed to investigate the effects of the CIPS-based Training Module on the professionalism of elementary school teachers. In addition, the training module consists of five (5) stages, which include pre-entering, plan, setting, action, and evaluation. The quasi-experimental research was conducted on 63 elementary teachers from Nunukan and Sebatik Island, North Kalimantan, Indonesia, assigned randomly to either an experiment or a control group. Before the training, a pre-test was conducted, followed by training using the module for the experiment groups, and no training for the control group. Furthermore, a post-test was conducted in both groups to identify the effectiveness of the training module. The independent sample t-test showed that the experimental group obtained a higher mean score than the control group. In conclusion, the CIPS-based Training Module effectively develops professionalism in teaching problem-solving skills among the experimental group's elementary teachers. Meanwhile, the study implies that rural elementary teachers need to be prepared to teach problem-solving skills.
Article
Objectives Arts-informed pedagogy in the graduate nursing classroom is used to support the integration of theory with advanced practice nursing (APN) competencies (Canadian Nurses Association, 2008, 2019). Methods Using the patterns of knowing (Carper, 1978; Chinn & Kramer, 2018), Iwasiw & Goldenberg’s curriculum development model (2015) and practice development (McCormack, Manley, & Titchen, 2013), two course professors facilitated the delivery of an innovative arts-informed approach in a nursing graduate program, the Quilt. Results The Quilt was meant to invite graduate students to critically reflect and create a visual depiction of their emergent identities as advanced practice nurse educators (APNEs). As three graduate student authors, we reflect on our experiences engaging with arts-informed pedagogy to explore the features of the collective APNE identity. The design and delivery of the Quilt is described. Conclusions Finally, we discuss the lessons learned, and the value of arts-informed pedagogy to support the meaningful integration of theory amongst graduate nursing students becoming APNEs.
Article
Full-text available
هدفت هذه الدراسة إلى تعرف درجة ممارسة القادة الاداريين في المديريات العامة للتربية والتعليم في سلطنة عمان للقيادة الابتكارية، ومن أجل تحقيق الهدف صممت استبانه مكونة من 41 فقرة، وبعد التأكد من دلالات صدقها وثباتها طبقت على ١٥١ فرداً هم: مديرو العموم ونوابهم، ومديرو الدوائر ونوابهم، ورؤساء الأقسام وذلك في العام الدراسي 2011/2012م. وللإجابة عن أسئلة الدراسة تم استخدام المتوسطات الحسابية والإنحرافات المعيارية وتحليل التباين واختبار (ت). وقد توصلت الدراسة إلى مجموعة من النتائج كان من أبرزها: أن درجة ممارسة القادة الإداريون في المديريات العامة للتربية والتعليم في سلطنة عمان للقيادة الابتكارية عالية، كما أشارت النتائج إلى وجود فروق ذات دلالة إحصائية عند مستوى دلالة 0.05 تعزى لأثر متغير النوع الاجتماعي، وجاءت الفروق لصالح الإناث. كذلك أشارت النتائج إلى عدم وجود فروق ذات دلالة إحصائية عند مستوى دلالة 0.05 تعزى لمتغيري المؤهل العلمي وسنوات الخبرة. وفي ضوء النتائج يوصي الباحثان بتفعيل مبدأ المشاركة في إتخاذ القرارات من قبل العاملين في المديريات العامة للتربية والتعليم، وتفعيل عملية التفويض مما يساعد العاملين على تحمل المسؤولية
Chapter
The goal of this chapter is to explain differentiation and digital differentiation and their intersecting points with pedagogical creativity, which become a necessity for 21st century teachers. In regards to pedagogical creativity, three main elements, which are creative teaching, teaching for creativity, and creative learning, will be discussed. Differentiation techniques and digital differentiation tools used for digitalizing in-class techniques will be explained. Further, an example of a digitally differentiated lesson plan will also be presented as a guide for teachers that require it.
Conference Paper
Full-text available
Creativity was essential for 21st-century teachers. Creativity makes teachers more creative in their learning. Another crucial skill was communication. Communication skills were one aspect of the teacher’s pedagogical competence. Communication skills were also very influential in concepts mastered by students. The development of 21st-century skills can be done maximally if the person consciously implements them and feels necessary about these skills. The purpose of this paper was to find out the perspectives of prospective teachers about the importance of creativity and communication skills for teachers and the importance of developing these skills for prospective teachers. The research method used in this research was descriptive and literature studies. Data were obtained by distributing questionnaires to 224 prospective teacher students (63 Postgraduate and 161 Undergraduate) in the Department of Biology FMIPA Universitas Negeri Malang. The questionnaire’s purpose was to determine the student’s perspective on (1) the importance of creativity and communication skills for teachers and (2) the importance of developing creativity and communication skills for prospective teacher students. Data analysis was performed using a qualitative approach. The questionnaire results showed that all prospective teacher students agreed that the teacher importantly possesses creativity and communication skills, and it is essential to develop for prospective teacher students. This questionnaire results contribute to knowing students’ awareness about the importance of creativity and communication skills for teachers and the need for the development of both skills in themselves.
Article
Full-text available
Learning physics problems still appear in many parts of the world. Along with this, the development of civilization demands the development of education to produce the skills that are the ultimate in every human being. 21st Century skills are skills that are relevant to the demands of the development of civilization. Pre-service Teacher needs to be prepared to overcome the problems of learning Physics by following with the times. This study aims to develop a skill-oriented Momentum teaching material of the 21st Century and the industrial revolution. This research is development research with stages: 1) Analysis of potential and problems, 2) Product design, 3) Design validation and design revision, 4) Product testing, 5) Analysis of trial results, and 6) final product assembly. The research instruments were in the form of observation sheets, tests, and questionnaires. The data analysis technique uses descriptive percentages. The results of the study in the form of scratch-assisted teaching materials that have characteristics provide opportunities for students to make momentum simulations independently. The percentage of the material validity score was 92.23% and the media validity was 88.64%. The results of the trial show that the acquisition of each skill score is more than 71, so it can be concluded that the materials teaching developed are practically used and effective to build 21st-century skills and industrial revolution 4.0.
Article
Full-text available
Good teaching requires pedagogical dynamism: a willingness to vary one’s teaching approach relative to the context (and cohort) at hand, and to any new challenges that may arise from that context. This requires that teachers obtain a broad knowledge of teaching strategies and tactics. Given the demands of contemporary higher education, finding the time to obtain this knowledge can pose a challenge to full‐time academics. This is exacerbated in the case of part‐time and practitioner‐teachers who often work in varying degrees of isolation from the communities of learning to which they contribute. An analysis of the teaching practices of eight high‐performing practitioner‐teachers, alongside data obtained from 74 students, within a master’s‐level architectural course at a large Australian university, has been used to delineate five strategies for optimising student learning within the architecture studio. These include: setting up a challenge that clearly articulates the role of the student within it; early and frequent assessment tasks to assist students in rapid skill development and reflective practice; communicating clear expectations around performance; facilitating a strong peer culture; and enhancing motivation via high expectations. This article details the tactics by which these strategies can be achieved. This article delivers directly applicable advice for architectural educators, but it also provides practical insight into the specifics of architectural teaching that may assist educators working in other disciplines.
Article
Full-text available
The purpose of this study was to investigate teachers and students perceptions about characteristics which either stimulate or inhibit the development of creativity in the classroom environment. Interviews were conducted with seven Connecticut public school teachers and 31 students (grades 3 and 4). The findings suggest that both teachers and students believe that a classroom environment which enhances creativity provides students with choices, accepts different ideas, boosts self‐confidence, and focuses on students’ strengths and interests. On the other hand, in an environment which inhibits creativity, ideas are ignored, teachers are controlling, and excessive structure exists.
Chapter
Creativity seems to be one of those concepts understood by everyone in the world except behavioral scientists. Although some segments of the public might hypothesize other reasons for this state of affairs, we believe the reason for this seeming paradox is as simple as the difference between the terms concept and construct. As a concept used by laypersons, creativity carries meaning in everyday speech that, although somewhat imprecise, is nevertheless widely shared; any surplus meaning is relatively unimportant; and operationalization for measurement purposes is a nonissue. As a scientific construct, however, creativity is held to a higher (or, at least, different) standard, and the construct validity issues surrounding the term can be frustrating in the extreme for researchers interested in investigating the phenomena of creative behavior and creative persons.
Article
This study was designed to capture the importance of factors associated with creativity in successful teaching in health education. The focus of the majority of earlier creativity studies in education, in general, has been on the students, while few, if any, studies having focused on practicing teachers at the college level. With this in mind, we conductedan open-ended interview to determine what factors were associated with creativity in health educators who had received university teaching awards. The telephone interviews were performed on 10 (five males and five females) university instructor/professors having received at least one student determined award. This study was based in part on the methodology employed in naturalistic inquiry. The challenges of teaching were met by the participants with perseverance, motivational factors were intrinsic, and supportive factors were those on the job and those associated with family members. Participants thought they used both divergent and convergent styles in generating and selecting ideas. Tension was identified as a major trigger in generating new ideas. Participants said that they experimented with new ideas, used personal and student cues, and were resilient when responding to failure. The majority of participants said that they experienced flow-like (optimal or peak) experiences, but were unable to create them on demand. All participants recognized the importance of using stories, analogies, parables, and metaphors in their teaching. The participants revealed what they believed separated them from other teachers. Finally, the participants recognized the role of creativity in their teaching and defined creativity as “the generating of something new and different … or taking something old and giving it a new direction or shaping it in adifferent way.” In conclusion, this study demonstrated the importance of the creative process and related qualities in those health educators having received an award at a university level.
Article
Many countries are increasing the priority schools assign to creative thinking. This departure from expectations of the past is considered a way to enhance productivity and improve mental health. But, efforts to replace customary education practices are often met with resistance, a loss of harmony, and challenges which are unforeseen. This presentation describes ways schools and families could provide greater support for creative behavior. The rules guiding instruction at all levels of education should be revised. Some recommended changes implicate teacher training, methods for the evaluation of learning, use of technology tools, expectations of students, and adult willingness to take into account student impressions about how to improve schools.
Article
Ninety-five beginning teachers and 116 experienced teachers rated the degree of usefulness of activities for fostering creativity on a 5–Likert scale (1 = not very useful, 5 = very useful). Three clusters (C) were elicited from their responses. C1 was featured by moderate and high ratings of teachers for all the learning activities. C2 was mainly characterized by student-centered independent and collaborative learning activities. C3 was highlighted by student-directed independent learning activities. About two thirds of the experienced teachers and one fifth of the beginning teachers belonged to C1. Nearly half and one fourth of the latter compared to one fifth of the former belonged to C2 and C3, respectively. Implications of the findings for Singaporean education were presented.
Article
Research on teachers' creativity fostering behavior has been much neglected in spite of the important role teachers play in developing student creativity. One possible reason for this is the lack of a suitable measure of teachers' creativity fostering behavior. A 45-item self-rating scale based on nine creativity fostering behaviors identified by Cropley (1997) was developed and validated with self-describing adjectives checklist. Analysis shows adequate construct and concurrent validities. Specific teachers' creativity fostering behaviors were found to correlate with sex and ethnicity. Further work is suggested.
Article
This paper examines the extraordinary mentorship that developed between Charles Darwin and his teacher, John Stevens Henslow of Cambridge University. It reflects upon the application of this relationship to gifted education. The discussion centers on the teaching and learning styles of Darwin and Henslow, the role of interests and of time spent together, the friendship which Henslow offered Darwin (particularly during the Beagle voyage), and the character traits of Henslow as mentor.
Article
Creativity has become a hot topic in academic circles, although it has only recently gained credibility as a legitimate subject for research. This paper highlights findings from a variety of research approaches (including psychometrics, cognitive psychology, historiometrics, biology, and contextual studies) with relevance to teaching and learning. Special emphasis is placed on ways to frame research as a creative endeavor.
Article
Whether instructions to be creative will act as goals or constraints was examined by comparing creative, practical, and analytical performance ratings under special instructions to be creative, practical, analytical, or under no special instructions at all, for 110 students with 2 different thinking styles. Consistent with goal-setting theory, specific-related instructions resulted in higher performance for each of the 3 performance ratings over no special instructions. In line with a person-situation fit model, people who prefer to play with their own ideas (i.e., those with a legislative thinking style) showed higher creative performance, whereas people who prefer to analyze and evaluate ideas (i.e., those with a judicial thinking style) showed lower creative performance when not given any special instructions.
Article
many disciplines in the behavioral and social sciences have provided perspectives that may be, in some measure, useful [in understanding creativity] / several of these perspectives will be briefly reviewed here, pursuant to positing an interactionist model of creative behavior that attempts to combine elements of the personality, cognitive, and social psychology perspectives on creativity / the proposed interactionist model provides a framework to explore in some detail a number of factors thought to be of importance in explaining individual differences in creative behavior (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2012 APA, all rights reserved)
Article
The goal of the chapters in this book is to explore the nature of creativity. The chapter authors take a wide variety of approaches in pursuit of this goal. The book is divided into four basic parts. The first part, containing a single chapter, deals with the relationship between creativity and the external environment of the individual. The second part of the book deals with the relationship between creativity and the internal environment of the individual. This part of the book is divided into two sections, one focusing on the psychometric approach to creativity and the other focusing on cognitive approaches. Part three of the book deals with the interaction between the internal and external environments of the individual. This part of the book is divided into two sections. The first section contains chapters that use the study of creative lives as a primary data base; the second section comprises chapters that are more generally historical in their orientation, using larger data bases rather than studies of small numbers of lives. The fourth and last part of the book contains an overview and integration by Tardif and Sternberg. The goal of this chapter is to organize the main themes in the theorists, various views of creativity and to suggest a variety of commonalities that hold together their various points of view. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2012 APA, all rights reserved)
Article
The literature on teacher behaviors that influence the development of creative abilities in children was reviewed. A historical overview of the concept of creativity within an educational context served to highlight the importance of the role of the teacher in providing the type of classroom environment that is conductive to creative learning. Teachers who show a humanistic philosophical orientation, have developed their own creative competencies, and implement specific creative methods and techniques in their classroom are more effective in enhancing students' creative abilities than teachers who follow more traditional instructional approaches.
Article
Presented in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of Master of Arts in Teaching. Thesis (M.A.T.)--Hollins University, 2002. Includes bibliographical references (p. 106-108).
Organizational creativity
  • W M Williams
  • L T Yang
Williams, W.M. & Yang, L.T. (1999) Organizational creativity. In Handbook of Creativity (ed. by R.J. Sternberg), pp. 373-391. Cambridge University Press, New York.
The development of inventories for factors that influence creativity development for personnel in technology and information industries
  • Y C Yeh
  • J J Wu
  • Y Y Cheng
Yeh, Y.C., Wu, J.J. & Cheng, Y.Y. (2000) The development of inventories for factors that influence creativity development for personnel in technology and information industries. Journal of Taiwan Normal University, 45, 39-63.
Motivation and creativity
  • M A Collins
  • T M Amabile
Collins, M.A. & Amabile, T.M. (1999) Motivation and creativity. In Handbook of Creativity (ed. by R.J. Sternberg), pp. 297–312. Cambridge University Press, New York.
Creativity and knowledge: a challenge to theories
  • R W Weisberg
Weisberg, R.W. (1999) Creativity and knowledge: a challenge to theories. In Handbook of Creativity (ed. by R.J. Sternberg), pp. 226-250. Cambridge University Press, New York.
Development and item response analysis of the creativity development inventory
  • W C Wang
  • Y Y Cheng
Wang, W.C. & Cheng, Y.Y. (2000) Development and item response analysis of the creativity development inventory. Annual Journal of Test, 47, 153-173.