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Racism and Nationalism

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Abstract

The article seeks to define the relationship between nationalism and racism in modem times. First, it defines racism as one of the principal nineteenth-century ideologies, sharply focused and centred upon the human body itself as its most potent symbol. Then it discusses nationalism as a much more loosely constructed faith which made alliances with most nineteenth-century ideologies such as liberalism, conservatism and socialism. When nationalism allied itself with racism it made racism operative -for example, within the integral nationalist movements from the end of the nineteenth century onwards. The article discusses how this alliance came about, and its consequences. It concludes that racism was never an indispensable element of nationalism. Moreover, it was not merely a form of discrimination, but a determinate way of looking at men and women which presented a total picture of the world. If nationalism made racism a reality, racism came to dominate nationalism once an alliance between the two movements had been consummated.

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Cambridge Core - African History - Politicizing Sex in Contemporary Africa - by Ashley Currier
Chapter
When we started a conversation about putting together an edited collection on Theories of Race and Ethnicity, we had in mind the need for a more up-to-date overview of the field of race and ethnic studies than the one provided in John Rex and David Mason’s (1986) Theories of Race and Ethnic Relations. That volume had come out in the mid 1980s, after a period of passionate, and often conflictual, debate about the changing boundaries of the study of race and ethnicity. Rex’s opening statement to his chapter provided a sense of this contestation. He wrote, ‘The study of race relations, in common with other politically charged areas in the social sciences, seems beset with feuds and conflicts of a quite theological intensity’ (Rex 1986: 64). The book set out to provide an overview of key theoretical lines of analysis in the field and to engage with some new and emergent perspectives. It contained 14 chapters covering the disciplines of sociology, social anthropology and social psychology as well as sociobiology. There were macro-level approaches to race and ethnicity drawing on class analysis, the study of plural societies and Weberian and Marxist perspectives, alongside micro-level approaches such as rational choice theory and symbolic interactionism. In other words, it combined and crossed over from traditional sociological perspectives to views from related social science disciplines; it ranged across biology and sociology, and it considered ethnicity and race in a variety of settings.
Book
What History Tells presents an impressive collection of critical papers from the September 2001 conference "An Historian's Legacy: George L. Mosse and Recent Research on Fascism, Society, and Culture." This book examines his historiographical legacy first within the context of his own life and the internal development of his work, and secondly by tracing the many ways in which Mosse influenced the subsequent study of contemporary history, European cultural history and modern Jewish history. The contributors include Walter Laqueur, David Sabean, Johann Sommerville, Emilio Gentile, Roger Griffin, Saul Friedlander, Jay Winter, Rudy Koshar, Robert Nye, Janna Bourke, Shulamit Volkov, and Steven E. Aschheim.
Book
Thesis (doctoral)--University of Oslo, 1998. Includes bibliographical references (p. 534-556). The thesis focuses on national relations between Czechs and Slovaks during the First Czechoslovak Republic, and was a pioneering work on Czechoslovakism. The research questions are 1) why the Czechoslovak nation project failed, and 2) why national conflicts between Czechs and Slovaks increased during the First Republic. The short answer is that Czechoslovakism failed both for reasons inherent in Czechoslovakism as ideology and for the same reasons that made the conflict level between Czechs and Slovaks rise. The former is about the limits for construction of national identities; the second is about nationally relevant conflicts.
Dissertation Physique a2 Mr
  • P Camper
Camper, P. 1781. Dissertation Physique a2 Mr. Pierre Camper, (ed.) Adrien Gilles Camper.
Les Jugs Algkriennes (187&1901). Pans. de Genst, H. 1949. Histoire de I'kducarion physique
  • Durieu
  • Louis
Durieu, Louis. 1902. Les Jugs Algkriennes (187&1901). Pans. de Genst, H. 1949. Histoire de I'kducarion physique. Vol. 11. Brussels.
Differcnce and Pathology: Stereotypes of Sexuality, Race and Madness
  • Gilman
  • Sander
Gilman, Sander L. 1985. Differcnce and Pathology: Stereotypes of Sexuality, Race and Madness.
Towards the Final Solution. A History of European Racism. London: Mosse, George L. 1985b. Nationalism and Sexuality The Image of Man: The Creation of Modern Masculinity
  • Mosse
  • George
Mosse, George L. 1985a. Towards the Final Solution. A History of European Racism. London: Mosse, George L. 1985b. Nationalism and Sexuality. New York: H. Fertig. Mosse, George L. 1996. The Image of Man: The Creation of Modern Masculinity. New York: Oxford University Press.
Auf der Suche nach Identitat: Romantischer Nationalismus
  • Nipperdey
  • Thomas
Nipperdey, Thomas. 1990. 'Auf der Suche nach Identitat: Romantischer Nationalismus', in T. Nipperdey (ed.), Nachdenken iiber die deutsche Geschichte. Munich: Deutscher Taschen-bach-Verlag.
Gedanken iiber die Nachahmung-der Grieschischen Werke
  • J J Winckelmann
Winckelmann, J. J. 1885 [1755]. Gedanken iiber die Nachahmung-der Grieschischen Werke. Stuttgart. Ithaca, NY: Cornell University Press. Dent.