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Teaching Idioms

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Abstract

ABSTRACT  Since idioms are figurative expressions that do not mean what they literally state and since they are so frequently encountered in both oral and written discourse, comprehending and producing idioms present language learners with a special vocabulary learning problem. Idiom acquisition research, however, has uncovered a number of findings that have pedagogical implications for idiom instruction. This article summarizes these research findings and presents the language teacher with a systematic plan for teaching idioms to native language learners, bilingual students, and foreign language learners.

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... A broader range of interesting teaching strategies is much needed to promote proficiency in African languages. The Setswana idioms in picture form programme has exposed a new field that needs to be explored further, following the examples set by researchers such as Liu (2008), Gibbs (1987) and Cooper (1998). It is hoped that the Setswana idioms in picture form programme has given impetus to such research. ...
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