A Couples Analysis Of Partner Abuse With Implications for Abuse-Prevention Policy. Criminology and Public Policy, 1, 5-36

Article · March 2006with120 Reads
DOI: 10.1111/j.1745-9133.2001.tb00075.x
Abstract
Research Summary: We studied a representative sample of 360 young-adult couples from a birth cohort. We found abuse was a dyadic process; both partners’ personal characteristics increased abuse risk, and both sexes participated in abuse, particularly in clinical abusive couples having injury and/or official agency intervention. Treating only men may not reduce risk completely for most young couples. Policy Implications: If replicated, the findings would suggest policy encouraging development and evaluation of programs to reduce physical abuse by women. Prevention programs could aim to reduce abusive behavior by both sexes and promote victim safety among both sexes. Policies against treating women in abusive couples may act counter to prevention.
    • The DSM-5 pathological personality facet profile of female students reporting a higher frequency of relationship violence portrays someone who engages others in unfriendly and uncaring ways and does not get emotionally close. Thus, the findings are generally consistent with our hypotheses and prior research linking IPV with Neuroticism/NEM, low Agreeableness, and antisocial PD (e.g., Hines & Saudino, 2008; Moffitt, Robins, et al., 2001; Stuart et al., 2006), as well as prior research indicating that domestically violent men were more likely to be depressed than both generally assaultive men and nonviolent men (Maiuro et al., 1988). Although we had no a priori hypotheses regarding negotiation tactics, we examined their associations with DSM-5 pathological personality facets across gender.
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract] ABSTRACT: The purpose of this study was to examine associations between pathological personality traits identified in the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (5th ed., DSM-5) Section III alternative model of personality disorder (using the Personality Inventory for DSM-5; PID-5) and intimate partner violence (IPV; using the Conflict Tactics Scale [CTS]) in a sample of male (N = 1,106) and female (N = 1,338) college students. In this sample, self and partner perpetration of CTS Relationship Violence and CTS Negotiation tactics loaded onto 2 separate factors. The PID-5 facets and domains were differentially associated with these factors for both men and women. Facets and domains explained 10.1%-16.1% and 5.8%-10.6% of the variance in CTS Relationship Violence tactics, respectively. For both genders, detachment was positively associated with relationship violence. Antagonism was uniquely associated with relationship violence for women, whereas disinhibition was uniquely associated with relationship violence for men. Associations with lower level pathological personality facets were also examined. Overall, results indicate that DSM-5 pathological personality traits are associated with IPV reported by both men and women.
    Article · Apr 2016
    • T h i s w o r k i s g r o u n d e d i n feminist practice and has been very influential especially in responding to proponents of gender symmetry in intimate partner violence. Debates about gender symmetry are long standing and hard fought (Straus 1993, Moffitt et al. 2001, Kimmel 2002, Dobash and Dobash 2004, Hester 2009, Dutton et al. 2010). Work by Johnson and colleagues (Kelly and Johnson 2008) o f f e r s a w a y t o r e c o n c i l e t h e c o m p e t i n g findings arising between studies conducted by proponents of a gender symmetry approach, and those framing their research with a gendered analysis.
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract] ABSTRACT: Developments in feminist theory and research towards a more complex approach to gender relations and a more differentiated understanding of gendered violence have been positive but also have been the subject of significant debate. Some debates have long histories, while others mark more newly emergent concerns. In this paper I reflect on three areas of debate: intersectionality, complex gendering and complex inequalities; differentiating between forms of gendered violence (with a focus on intimate partner violence (IPV)), and criminalisation. In each of these areas, feminist frameworks and knowledge concerning gendered violence have been challenged and the resurgence of gender neutral accounts has been notable. I argue that keeping a structural analysis to the fore provides the best way forward for constructive debate in the field aligned with feminist aspirations for the achievement of substantive equality. El desarrollo de la teoría feminista y la investigación hacia un enfoque más complejo de las relaciones de género y una comprensión más diferenciada de la violencia de género ha sido positivo, pero también ha sido objeto de un importante debate. Algunos debates tienen una larga historia, mientras que otros marcan preocupaciones emergentes surgidas en los últimos tiempos. En este trabajo se reflexiona sobre tres áreas de debate: interseccionalidad, configuración de géneros compleja y desigualdades complejas; diferenciación entre formas de violencia de género (fijándose en la violencia de pareja (VP)); y la criminalización. En cada una de estas áreas, se han cuestionado los marcos feministas y el conocimiento relativo a la violencia de género, y ha sido notable el resurgimiento de cuentas de género neutro. Se defiende que fomentar un análisis estructural ofrece la mejor forma de fomentar un debate constructivo en el campo alineado con las aspiraciones feministas para el logro de una igualdad sustantiva. DOWNLOAD THIS PAPER FROM SSRN: http://ssrn.com/abstract=2700351
    Full-text · Article · Dec 2015
    • Family climate. The family Relationship Index is a 27-item, unidimensional measurement of the quality of social relationships in the family environment as measured by cohesion, expressiveness and conflict (Moos & Moos, 1994). The Cronbach 's in this study were .88,
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract] ABSTRACT: In this study we apply the versatile/specialist offender debate to the research of intimate partner violence. We propose the existence of two types of imprisoned male batterers: the generalist and the specialist batterer. The individual, family, and community characteristics of these types of batterers are further explored in 110 imprisoned males in the Penitentiary of Villabona (Spain). As for the individual characteristics, results indicate that the generalist batterer present higher levels of psychopathology (specially antisocial and borderline personality), sexist attitudes, and substance dependence. Specialist batterers presented higher levels of conflict in their family of origin. Finally, generalist batterers reported coming from more socially disordered communities and showed lower levels of participation and integration in these communities than the specialist batterer. These results suggest that the classical distinctions among batterers based on psychopathology and context of violence (whether general or family only) might be of little utility when applied to imprisoned male batterers.
    Full-text · Article · Nov 2015
    • Third, the high degree of bidirectional aggression observed during early adulthood strongly supports the argument that intervention and prevention efforts need to focus on both partners in order to effectively reduce aggression within romantic relationships (Moffitt et al., 2001). Such a dyadic approach is different from the existing batterer programs that were originally based on the notion that men are the primary perpetrators of aggression and that their violence is largely driven by their desire to control their partners (Dobash & Dobash, 1979).
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract] ABSTRACT: Aggression and coercive behaviors in the form of physical assaults, psychological aggression, and sexual coercion—often referred to as intimate partner violence (IPV)—are highly prevalent in couples during early adulthood (ages 18 through 29 years). Although such IPV has long been recognized as a major public health problem, the existing intervention programs have shown limited effects. Since the late 1990s researchers have sought to identify more nuanced developmental pathways and interactional processes of IPV in young couples in order to better inform prevention and intervention efforts. This chapter first discusses characteristics of IPV in early adulthood and then outlines key assumptions of the dynamic developmental systems model, an extension of coercion theory, as a framework for understanding the development of IPV. It then provides relevant empirical findings from our Oregon Youth Study-Couples Study. We also discuss clinical implications of the findings from our work.
    Full-text · Chapter · Apr 2015 · The European Journal of Psychology Applied to Legal Context
    • Given that IPV has physical and psychological effects on both males and females and the impact of psychological IPV can be as harmful as or worse than physical IPV, more broadly applicable interventions are needed. Moreover, IPV is a dyadic process and it can be argued that targeting only one partner is less likely to be as effective than targeting both partners (Moffitt, Robins, & Caspi, 2001). Indeed, in his review of couple based treatments for IPV, O'Leary (2008) provides evidence that couple interventions for IPV are at least as effective as individual interventions and that the couple format does not cause increased risk for harm relative to treatments that focus on one partner only.
    File · Data · Jun 2014 · The European Journal of Psychology Applied to Legal Context
    • Given that IPV has physical and psychological effects on both males and females and the impact of psychological IPV can be as harmful as or worse than physical IPV, more broadly applicable interventions are needed. Moreover, IPV is a dyadic process and it can be argued that targeting only one partner is less likely to be as effective than targeting both partners (Moffitt, Robins, & Caspi, 2001). Indeed, in his review of couple based treatments for IPV, O'Leary (2008) provides evidence that couple interventions for IPV are at least as effective as individual interventions and that the couple format does not cause increased risk for harm relative to treatments that focus on one partner only.
    File · Data · Jun 2014 · The European Journal of Psychology Applied to Legal Context
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