Chapter

Dietetic Bakery Products

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Abstract

This chapter introduces bakery products that cater for the special dietary needs of consumers. It focuses on food intolerances specifically gluten and lactose intolerance and allergy to eggs. The chapter explains bakery products that contribute to a healthier life-style (low-fat, low-sugar, and high fiber products). It deals with the bakery products required for specialized diet requirements for diabetic consumers. The chapter also focuses on bakery products for special religious diet requirements (kosher and Halal baking). It examines the bakery products suitable for sports nutrition, vegetarianism, and veganism. The chapter discusses about the bakery products suitable for various stages of human development such as children, women, and seniors.

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