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Queer Belongings: Kinship Theory and Queer Theory

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This chapter contains section titled: The Queerness within Kinship Theory Queering Theories of Lesbian and Gay Kinship Performing Becoming Belonging The Queerness within Kinship Theory Queering Theories of Lesbian and Gay Kinship Performing Becoming Belonging

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... Whereas the absence of blood kinship serves as a prerequisite in constructing a depoliticized gay figure on the stage, the blood family becomes central in imagining and articulating queerness in the musical's off-stage campaign. Euro-American queer theorists have interrogated and challenged the conceptualization of blood kinship as a heteronormative field that forecloses the legitimacy of queer bonds, through which they highlight the urgency to include other elements in theorizing non-heterosexual forms of kinship (Kath Weston 1991;Judith Butler 2002;Elizabeth Freeman 2007). Famously, in her book Families We Choose: Gays, Lesbians, Kinship (1991), Weston foregrounds the common experiences of coming out and independence from the blood family as key elements in constituting gay and lesbian kinship. ...
... Famously, in her book Families We Choose: Gays, Lesbians, Kinship (1991), Weston foregrounds the common experiences of coming out and independence from the blood family as key elements in constituting gay and lesbian kinship. Such a liberal model of kinship based on "choice," however, has been critiqued for perpetuating a romanticized notion of "community" based on a range of economic, social, and cultural privileges (Freeman 2007). This is particularly true in Chinese and Confucian societies, where gay identity is "defined and socially positioned in relation to family" (Chris Berry 2001). ...
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This paper investigates the cultural politics in the recent proliferation of queer popular cultural products in China through a case study of Q Dadao, a Chinese adaptation of the Broadway musical Avenue Q. Situating the musical in the illiberal conditions of concurrent economic liberalization and ideological control in a globalizing China, the paper examines how liberationist politics embedded in the original musical is transculturally negotiated and reimagined in the Chinese version to engender fundamentally new queer tactics. In particular, the paper highlights the paradoxes and ambivalences in the musical’s cultural politics, and puts forward a framework of illiberal homonormativity to understand complexity and multifariousness of queer identities and embodiments in China today.
... ). Schwarze Lesben mit Kindern wiederum greifen auf die Tradition in Communities of Color zurück, um Verwandtschaft jenseits einer biogenetischen Verbindung zu konzi pieren(Moore 2011). Als Familie verstehen sich auch Trans* of Color und Schwarze Trans* insbesondere im US-amerikanischen Kontext, die als ‚Zöglinge' von sogenann ten house mothers in die Performance-Kultur des voguing und Sexarbeit eingeführt werden(Freeman 2007). (Lesbische) Feminist_innen -insbesondere Feminist_innen of Color -verwenden seit den 1970er-Jahren Verwandtschaftsbegriffe, wenn sie Mit-aktivist_innen als ‚Schwestern' bezeichnen(Piesche 2012; Women of Black Heritage 2003;Moraga/Anzaldúa 1983[1981;Hacker 1987;Kokula/Böhmer 1991). ...
Article
Dieser Beitrag untersucht, wie der Wandel familialer und verwandtschaftlicher Nähe- und Fürsorgeverhältnisse durch die Forderungen von Familien mit schwul, lesbisch, bisexuell, trans* und/oder genderqueer lebenden Eltern nach rechtlicher Anerkennung politisch diskutiert wird. Anhand einer diskurstheoretischen Analyse der Debatten im Schweizer Bundesparlament sowie ethnografischen Datenmaterials wird der Frage nachgegangen, welche Zeitlichkeiten in der polarisierten Auseinandersetzung um die Bedeutung des Phänomens ‚Regenbogenfamilien‘ und deren politischen Forderungen aufgerufen werden. Der Beitrag zeigt, wie die Erweiterung der rechtlichen Anerkennung von Familie durch homonormative und nationalistische Grenzen abgesichert wird und wie sich ambivalente Normalisierungsprozesse konstitutiv für Fortschrittspolitiken herausstellen.
... Piotr emphasises his concern resulting from attachment, readiness to help in all circumstances, and even sacrifice: Acts of care or support regarded as significant for building a sense of being a family, probably due to the perception of the family as the primary source of care, go beyond the kin normativity as a system determining membership and based on exclusion. Many scholars associated with queer theory perceive the acts of care as the possibility of reworking the traditional construct of family or kinship (Freeman 2007). They believe that only by focusing on acts of care outside the family it will be possible to describe significant relationships for non-heterosexual people (Roseneil and Budgeon 2004). ...
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Queer Kinship on the Edge explores ways in which queer families from Central and Easter Europe complicate the mainstream picture of queer kinship and families researched in the Anglo-American contexts. The book presents findings from under-represented localities as a starting point to query some of the expectations about queer kinship and to provide insights on the scale and nature of queer kinship in diverse geo-political locations and the complexities of lived experiences of queer families. Drawing on on rich qualitative multi-method study to address the gap in queer kinship studies which tend to exclude Polish or wider Central and Eastern perspectives, it offers a multi-dimensional picture of ‘families of choice’ improving sensitivity towards differences in queer kinship studies. Through case studies and interviews with diverse members of queer families (i.e. queer parents, their children) and their families of origin (parents and siblings) the book looks at queer domesticity, practices of care, defining and displaying families, queer parenthood familial homophobia, and interpersonal relationships through the life-course. This study is suitable for those interested in LGBT Studies, Sexuality Studies, Kinship and Eastern European Studies.
... Given increasing societal acceptance of and legal protection for lesbian, gay, and bisexual (LGB) people in many developed countries (Flores et al., 2018), more and more LGB individuals come out at an earlier life stage and consider pursuing parenthood as one of their possible life choices (Gato et al., 2017). However, not all LGB people prefer and have the capacity to freely come out and challenge established family norms in different contexts (Freeman, 2007). Recent Western literature has indicated that LGB people continue to struggle to come out, especially to their families of origin (Alonzo and Buttitta, 2019). ...
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This article explores the ways in which Chinese lesbians, who identify themselves as lalas, form their own families and navigate their relationships with families of origin. To date, there is a lack of research on families formed by same-sex couples in urban China, where homosexuality remains stigmatized. Drawing on semi-structured interviews with 35 lala-identified women in Beijing, this article shows that lalas’ formation of families has been shaped by, but at the same time shaping, their relationships with their families of origin, who tend to embrace heteronormative family beliefs. Engaging with ongoing debates on choice and individualization, this study reveals the tensions between lalas’ family aspirations and gendered, familial, material, and socio-political constraints imposed on female-led same-sex families. It contributes to sociological understanding of family change by revealing alternative paths to same-sex family formation in a context where the act of coming out is challenging and families formed by same-sex couples remain largely invisible.
... More recently, the notion of belonging has been explored as political discourse informed by hegemonic practices focusing on minority or displaced segments (Beekers & Schrijvers, 2020). Though belonging is linked to individual wellbeing (Hudson, 2015), such experiences are typically afforded to sections of the society that fit the norm, with those who depart being relegated to the fringe (Freeman, 2007). Accordingly, for LGBTIQ+ communities, feeling included in the societies they live is an important aspect of belonging. ...
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Event programmes are typically designed with a target audience in mind, and such design can inherently signal inclusion or exclusion of marginalised segments. This is particularly the case for lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, intersex and queer (LGBTIQ+) individuals, whose sexual and gender identities position them as an invisible minority on the periphery of society. Given the role of events in building community spirit, it is essential to ensure all members of a community feel able to participate in order to create a sense of belonging, fulfilling Sustainable Development Goals of inclusivity in community. Through the lens of Social Dominance Theory and in pursuit of equality for LGBTIQ+ communities, in-depth interviews were conducted with sexually diverse (queer) participants to explore their perceptions of inclusivity at community events. This study explored how elements of an event could serve to enhance or attenuate prejudice, and therefore influence the inclusion of LGBTIQ+ communities.
... The taboo of reassociation functions to mark the lesbian romance as synonymous with exile and deathboth literally and figuratively. In her discussions of queer lives, Elizabeth Freeman (2007) identifies the lack of 'extendability' as a key concern in queers' vision of the present and the future. A major challenge of queer theory, she remarks, remains to 'continually identify practices of renewal that exceed the state's major form of "recognition"' (ibid., 299). ...
Article
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This paper offers a critical queer analysis of Star Trek as a history of the future. Juxtaposing two episodes of queerness from Star Trek’s canon with the show’s depiction of gay characters in its latest drama series, the paper unpacks the multiple levels of queerness that are at once facilitated and restricted by the show’s visions of the future. Drawing on discussions of queer futurity, it argues for the usefulness of a queer reparative reading strategy in intervening in heteronormative models of the future and opening up potentialities for queer world-making. Abbreviations: ST: TOS: Star Trek: The Original Series; ST: TNG: Star Trek: The Next Generation; ST: DS9: Star Trek: Deep Space Nine; ST: VOY: Star Trek: Voyager; ST: ENT: Star Trek: Enterprise; ST: DIS: Star Trek: Discovery
... In her discussion on queer theory and kinship, Freeman (2007) also highlights the influential work of Foucault. She suggests that Foucault sees the 'modern family' residing 'at the intersection between kinship and sexuality', claiming that normative ideas about family continue to shape 'expectations' about gender and sexuality (Freeman, 2007: 296, emphasis found in original). ...
Thesis
Despite the increasing literature on LGBTQ families, there continues to be limited research on the children within these families. The social, legal and political context for LGBTQ people has transformed drastically over the twentieth and twenty-first century. However, we know little about how these changes will have shaped the life courses of people raised by LGBTQ parents. The data within this thesis comes from 20 biographical interviews with adult-children raised by lesbian, bisexual, trans and queer (LBTQ) parents in England and Scotland. This thesis explores how people with LBTQ parents narrate their life stories, particularly addressing the intersections of family, identity, social norms and historical context. I use a combination of life course and queer theory to discuss the complex and messy everyday spatialities and relationalities found in participant life stories. The study examines the interplay between notions of normative families, genders and sexualities, and alternative everyday practices in families with LBTQ parents. This analysis is combined with a geographical and temporal lens, discussing how family practices, emotions and relationships can shift through time and space. I firstly discuss this in relation to genetic normativity, noting that although people with LBTQ parents often live in families that seem to resist dominant notions of biological relatedness, genetic discourses remain significant to those raised by LBTQ parents. This suggests that children raised in LBTQ households must navigate between the non-traditional aspects of their families and ongoing normative genetic discourses. Secondly, I examine queer origin stories, highlighting the ways that adult-children with LBTQ parents emphasise the importance of knowing their queer family histories, rather than only their genetic relations. This demonstrates the ways that adult-children can re-create, re-shape and re-tell their queer origin stories in adulthood. Third, I look into how participants narrated their experiences within the various spaces they moved between. I focus on the idea of ‘coming out’ or disclosure, to discuss how the power within specific contexts prompt different practices, displays, and feelings from people with LBTQ parents. Finally, I explore how participants related to ideas of normality and normativity more broadly, noting adult-children’s pursuit of intelligibility and legitimacy; how adult-children engage in quiet forms of everyday activism; and complicate traditional notions of the idealised life course. These findings contribute to the geographies of family and intimacy and sociological understandings of LGBTQ and queer kinship, adding to the limited body of work on children raised by non-heterosexual or gender confirming parents.
... Ahmed does so to explain how the question of being home is a matter of affect: "how one feels or how one might fail to feel!" (Ahmed, 1999, p. 342) Sensing and making sense of one's place in both spatial and temporal terms also include feelings of estrangement, discomfort, an impossibility to extend or return, and discontinuities of past and present; queer conditions, so to speak, that foster forms of belonging and enable the emergence of communities. Elizabeth Freeman (2007) argues that belonging is just as much a question of who is connected to whom as it is of one's extendability into the future. This is particularly relevant to her discussion of queer bodies, for whom belonging goes beyond the mere longing to be or be connected. ...
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Proceeding from discussions within a multidisciplinary working group, this text outlines key dimensions and identifies affective registers with regard to the notion of belonging. Further, it presents case studies from two research projects: an ethnographic account of a Vietnamese migrant community in Berlin and a literary-studies analysis of writings of the contemporary German-language author Herta Müller. The cases highlight the simultaneously cohesive and disruptive forces at play in relational processes of belonging; they bring into view the heterogeneously constituted settings, where such processes unfold; and finally, they effectively disturb the causal logic that belonging necessarily stems from conditions of mobility.
... Our selection of fem-inal, as opposed to semin-al texts, trouble masculine citation practices and genealogies. In this spirit, we mark the key conceptual terrains of a series of central queer kinshipping (Freeman, 2008;Haraway, 2016) partnerships and feminist fore-mothers and we view as underpinning some key moves in the traditions of feminist new materialism. We ground our discussion in the queer partnership of Deleuze and Guattari, who worked at the intersections of psychiatry and philosophy to offer important new concepts for rethinking the individual, society and power. ...
Book
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This edited collection is a careful assemblage of papers that have contributed to the maturing field within education studies that works with the feminist implications of the theories and methodologies of posthumanism and new materialism-what we have also called elsewhere 'PhEmaterialism'. The generative questions for this collection are: what if we locate education in doing and becoming rather than being? And, how does associating education with matter, multiplicity and relationality change how we think about agency, ontology and epistemology? This collection foregrounds cutting-edge educational research that works to trouble the binaries between theory and methodology. It demonstrates new forms of feminist ethics and response-ability in research practices, and offers some coherence to this new area of research. This volume will provide a vital reference text for educational researchers and scholars interested in this burgeoning area of theoretically informed methodology and methodologically informed theory.
Article
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The paper at hand interrogates the queer temporal politics of “houses” in the ballroom and voguing scene. Houses constitute the axiomatic unit of this community marked by racial and sexual marginalisation and as such create alternative familial relations between members in response to rejections from the biological family and society in general. Mirroring the traditional family institution, vogue houses not only become a source of protection, care, trust and knowledge; their very structure, I argue, induces a queer repro-generational time. Countering the sequential heteronormative time of lifetime milestones and age-fitting achievements, the queer time of voguing is a temporal disidentification that jumbles around and constructively misappropriates generational and reproductive imperatives. In doing this, the politics of voguing opens the horizon of possible futures: it is a spark of embodied resistance with a queer utopian imaginary.
Chapter
This entry introduces diverging concepts of “queer futurity” and places particular emphasis on intersecting questions of race and kinship.
Article
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QUEERS AND QUEER theory have had a troubled relationship to both kinship and the theory thereof. To put it crudely, kinship (theory) has disinherited queers in at least two obvious ways. Due to "our" failure to love "the right way" (i.e. to love the opposite sex) queers are pushed out of the heteronormative family fold and due to the seeming failure of "our" romantic love to miraculously turn into offspring, we are deemed as traitors to the future of the race. At the same time, we might argue that "kinship is the imagined site of our most intimate bonds" (Rodríguez 2014, 29) and that as an institution and an ideal, the family remains the site of some of our deepest (sexual) fantasies, as well as our strongest (political) longings for recognition. Some may say that thanks to the victories of LGBTQ rights activism and the recognition that it has brought about, queer love/desire no longer inevitably leads to a loss of family and futurity. That is, unless we wish to argue that queer inevitably means making familial bonds through camp and community or that it relies on replication, recruitment, and righteousness rather than reproduction and assimilation. Indeed, same-sex love is, in some nations and contexts, recognized and assimilated into the ever-expanding "norm" of reproducing the species and the nation. Others might say that this is only the case for those queers who are fetching, fertile, fortunate, and
Chapter
The contributors to this volume assert the importance of queer kinship to queer and trans theory and to kinship theory. In a contemporary moment marked by the rising tides of neoliberalism, fascism, xenophobia, and homo- and cis-nationalism, they approach kinship as both a horizon and a source of violence and possibility. The contributors challenge dominant theories of kinship that ignore the devastating impacts of chattel slavery, settler colonialism, and racialized nationalism on the bonds of Black and Indigenous people and people of color. Among other topics, they examine the “blood tie” as the legal marker of kin relations, the everyday experiences and memories of trans mothers and daughters in Istanbul, the outsourcing of reproductive labor in postcolonial India, kinship as a model of governance beyond the liberal state, and the intergenerational effects of the adoption of Indigenous children as a technology of settler colonialism. Queer Kinship pushes the methodological and theoretical underpinnings of queer theory forward while opening up new paths for studying kinship. Contributors. Aqdas Aftab, Leah Claire Allen, Tyler Bradway, Juliana Demartini Brito, Judith Butler, Dilara Çalışkan, Christopher Chamberlin, Aobo Dong, Brigitte Fielder, Elizabeth Freeman, John S. Garrison, Nat Hurley, Joseph M. Pierce, Mark Rifkin, Poulomi Saha, Kath Weston
Article
The feminist philosophy of “ethics of care” has been important for disability studies inasmuch as it helps us see caregiving as widespread and admirable, rather than as a failure of autonomy. Care ethicists usually imagine care as either an institutional situation or an intimate dyad. However, in “Critical Care,” I add a third case in a midrange scale: the care community. The care community is a voluntary social formation, composed of friends, family, and neighbors, that coalesces around someone in need. It is my contention that by exploring the care community, we can make important aspects of care visible and rethink care relationships. What we see in care communities is a process, rather than a preset care structure, and that fluidity allows us to interrogate the conditions under which care can develop and the dynamics of extended care. I use Victorian fiction to showcase care communities, since novels of this period are marked by ubiquitous spontaneous small groups forming around people who are ill or hurt, but I also make a case that care communities continue to exist today, particularly among queer communities and people of color, performing a vital function in our ordinary lives. Finally, I argue that care communities can help us fundamentally rethink disability as a need like any other need rather than an inherent identity. Eva Feder Kittay has argued that care relations are the foundation of civic society; in that case, disability and the care community that arises in response to it are not marginalized cases but are what, profoundly, makes social life possible.
Chapter
The Wachowskis’ Sense8 is considered one of the most diverse television programmes to date. As its eight lead characters are scattered across the globe, it portrays a range of nationalities, ethnicities and religions. Called a “LGBT masterpiece,” it also represents a wide spectrum of gender and sexual identities, including homosexuality, pansexuality, polyamory, transgenderism and gender queerness. This chapter argues that Sense8 queers not only gender and sexuality but also love and family. It celebrates alternative forms of kinship that challenge the heteronormative model of family. To do so, it uses the generic features of the quality drama as pedagogical tools. Indeed, as a Netflix original programme, it recuperates premium cable’s rhetoric of quality TV and teaches through cinematic narrative structures, graphic sex scenes and self-reflexivity. But while most HBO-type quality dramas use realism as a pedagogical tool, Sense8 teaches through science-fiction, extraordinary characters and a spectacular aesthetic inspired by action/mystery thrillers.
Chapter
Transparent is a critically acclaimed drama broadcast by Amazon. Created by the non-binary producer Jill Soloway, it centres on the life of the transwoman, Maura Pfefferman. Since its first season, it has been praised for promoting trans visibility and for offering positive depictions of the LGBT+ community. This chapter demonstrates how Transparent, a quality drama, educates through characters, emotion and storytelling. It argues that the series’ pedagogy is complex because it combines contradictory techniques. While it invites viewers to learn about trans experiences through Maura, the protagonist played by Jeffrey Tambor, the text also uses its many other queer characters to offset her pedagogical limitations. Moreover, although it often teaches through realism, Transparent sometimes disrupts the illusion of verisimilitude, using unrealistic sequences to show what being queer feels like.
Chapter
This chapter investigates the pedagogy of The Prancing Elites Project, a reality programme broadcast on Oxygen that follows the Prancing Elites, a team of five African-American dancers who identify as gay, transgender and gender non-conforming. It explores the series’ representation of queerness in relation to the black/African-American identity, showing how the Prancing Elites, like members of ballrooms, use artistic performance to queer gender, sexuality, race and kin relationships. This chapter also shows how the series employs entertainment techniques to educate about queerness, homophobia and transphobia in the black/African-American community. Although it uses the codes and conventions of factual television, the text primarily relies on dramatic music, slow and fast editing, melodrama and happy endings to teach about queerness.
Chapter
This chapter explores narratives of heterosexual and queer, partnered, and single parents who have used in vitro fertilisation (IVF) programs or international surrogacy services to have children who are genetically theirs. By interrogating the intersection of biology and culture in the making of parenthood, this chapter examines how the impersonal technoscapes of IVF and international surrogacy configure the emotional lives of their participants. It asks: What new bodily and emotional attachments emerge when we introduce technologies that alienate the process of conception from heterosexual intimacy? How do technologies of procreation shape the desires and feelings of the people who achieve parenthood through them? In exploring these questions, the chapter argues that assisted reproductive technology (ART) creates postnatural assemblages of intimacy, which are formed through the connective apparatuses that enable the exchange of commoditised reproductive organs, gametes, and babies in local and global markets.
Article
This article assesses the queer world-making potentiality of the comics form as demonstrated in Alison Bechdel's 2006 graphic memoir Fun Home. By deploying the temporal openings of the graphic form, Fun Home challenges the putative fixity of heteronormative family time and the temporality of kinship lines more broadly. Bechdel represents this queering of generation and kinship as a constituent part of the young Alison's coming-of-age as a queer comics artist; this temporal reworking simultaneously makes possible a queer reparative web of affiliation. Building on Eve Kosofsky Sedgwick's model of reparative reading, I demonstrate how Fun Home's formproduces a version of reparation that emerges from a shared artistry and embraces ambivalent affective responses to the past. Ultimately, Bechdel produces a queer feminist reparative reading that understands futurity's potential as complex and grounded in both the pain and pleasure of the queer body.
Article
This article draws on interviews with 17 self-identified lesbian and bisexual women living in Havana, Cuba, focusing on state support for their family relationships. It examines some of the tensions and contradictions between international and national policy, and societal norms, some of which support LGBT people, and some of which do not. In many ways, Cuba is progressive and has actively protected women’s rights. However, non-heterosexual and gender non-conforming women appear to have been somewhat overlooked in the gains of the Revolution, as there are few specific policies protecting their rights. The key policy points participants raised were the need for same-sex marriage and the lack of assisted reproduction for those in same-sex relationships. Nonetheless, Cuba’s traditional non-nuclear family forms also provide some social space for LGBT parents and queer families.
Chapter
Branden Buehler and Roxanne Samer examine a model of academic kinship that supplants the traditional model rooted in the idea of genealogy, thereby suggesting that to be or think queer in academic spaces requires that we rethink the way that scholars and ideas are related in the academy. Academia, including the system of advisors, dissertation committees, peer groups, and the departments to which we belong, is often conceptualized as a family tree. However, the classic tree metaphor—borrowed from heteronormative forms of kinship structures—might not be the best model for a system that is often more circular than linear, more communal than hierarchical. Buehler and Samer explore how scholars become oriented toward the ideas of others and directed by certain lines of thought. Building on Sara Ahmed’s work on queer phenomenology and Gérard Genette’s theories of paratexts, Buehler and Samer take up acknowledgments sections as archives chronicling their authors’ intellectual influences and look at the kinship structures traceable within, between, and across them. Their theorizing of queer academic genealogies is further informed by their deployment of social network analysis software, which they use to map the web of queer studies’ thank-yous, anecdotes, and in-jokes that can be found within its acknowledgments sections. In doing so, they identify academic relationships and social bonds that normally go unseen. While they focus their study in terms of sample and critical investment, their approach could be extended to demonstrate in a broader fashion the ways in which all intellectual concerns, disciplines, and methodologies take shape over time. Buehler and Samer’s analysis thus offers up a way of mapping structures and systems of knowledge, informed not by trite metaphors, but by the flexibility and dialectics of queer theory.
Article
This article explores the phenomenon of the de and rehumanization of khwaja siras in two Pakistani national television plays: Alif Allah Aur Insaan (Alpha, Allah and Man) and Khuda Mera Bhi Hai (God is Mine too). I argue that these two plays made a significant contribution to the reimagining and reconstruction of khwaja sira subjectivities, which were later endorsed by Third gender legislation in 2009 and the Pakistan National Assembly’s historic Transgender Persons (Protection of Rights) Act of 2018. In order to understand the process of the reversal of dehumanization, namely rehumanization, I discuss how violence (both physical and psychological) has been legitimized in Pakistan’s patriarchal society by restricting the mobility of khwaja siras in both private and public spaces. Against the backdrop of processes of multi-layered dehumanization and systemic violence, I argue that the pro-(gendered) minority narratives in these plays initiated a process of redefining the notions of home, belonging and relatedness for transgenders; in so doing, the newly-constructed multi-dimensional khwaja sira subjectivities gesture towards the (re)opening of gender restrictive spaces, enumerating the complex ways in which khwaja siras assert their agency and inclusion within mainstream society through resistance and collective action.
Chapter
In contrast to Levy, Dionne Brand’s novel represents a more radical postcolonial intervention in historiography. It demands a reassessment of the meaning of history and kinship, and their relationship to each other, in Black Atlantic contexts, suggesting that the experiences of slavery and the afterlife of slavery require and create alternative modes of relationality and subjectivity. Both normative kinship and history prove elusive and desirable, yet limiting and oppressive. National histories and colonial historiography are revealed as profoundly heteronormative, and it becomes clear that the diasporic lives of the novel's characters are queered by their displacement from national heteronormativity - yet queer does not necessarily mean liberating. Narrating these experience demands a similarly fractured, non-linear mode of writing, in which history and present subjectivities are generated in interaction with one another.
Chapter
The conclusion shows how these six novels and their treatment of postcolonial, diasporic kinship offer a perspective on current debates on subjectivity, (post)humanism and modernity. These representations of diasporic experience rework the group identity traditionally associated with diaspora into a form of post-individual relationality, while also demonstrating the risks or limits attendant on such a strategy of becoming and social change. In particular, through these texts’ engagement with and rewriting of kinship, they are able to bring together reflections on the colonial history of kinship discourses, the forms of intimate resistance to colonialism, and the reverberations of both on forms of intimacy, family, and diaspora today. By rethinking and rewriting anthropology, historiography, and the meaning of loss and mourning, they challenge assumptions about the meaning and enaction of forms of intimate relationality to culture and subjectivity.
Chapter
The contributors to this volume assert the importance of queer kinship to queer and trans theory and to kinship theory. In a contemporary moment marked by the rising tides of neoliberalism, fascism, xenophobia, and homo- and cis-nationalism, they approach kinship as both a horizon and a source of violence and possibility. The contributors challenge dominant theories of kinship that ignore the devastating impacts of chattel slavery, settler colonialism, and racialized nationalism on the bonds of Black and Indigenous people and people of color. Among other topics, they examine the “blood tie” as the legal marker of kin relations, the everyday experiences and memories of trans mothers and daughters in Istanbul, the outsourcing of reproductive labor in postcolonial India, kinship as a model of governance beyond the liberal state, and the intergenerational effects of the adoption of Indigenous children as a technology of settler colonialism. Queer Kinship pushes the methodological and theoretical underpinnings of queer theory forward while opening up new paths for studying kinship. Contributors. Aqdas Aftab, Leah Claire Allen, Tyler Bradway, Juliana Demartini Brito, Judith Butler, Dilara Çalışkan, Christopher Chamberlin, Aobo Dong, Brigitte Fielder, Elizabeth Freeman, John S. Garrison, Nat Hurley, Joseph M. Pierce, Mark Rifkin, Poulomi Saha, Kath Weston
Chapter
The contributors to this volume assert the importance of queer kinship to queer and trans theory and to kinship theory. In a contemporary moment marked by the rising tides of neoliberalism, fascism, xenophobia, and homo- and cis-nationalism, they approach kinship as both a horizon and a source of violence and possibility. The contributors challenge dominant theories of kinship that ignore the devastating impacts of chattel slavery, settler colonialism, and racialized nationalism on the bonds of Black and Indigenous people and people of color. Among other topics, they examine the “blood tie” as the legal marker of kin relations, the everyday experiences and memories of trans mothers and daughters in Istanbul, the outsourcing of reproductive labor in postcolonial India, kinship as a model of governance beyond the liberal state, and the intergenerational effects of the adoption of Indigenous children as a technology of settler colonialism. Queer Kinship pushes the methodological and theoretical underpinnings of queer theory forward while opening up new paths for studying kinship. Contributors. Aqdas Aftab, Leah Claire Allen, Tyler Bradway, Juliana Demartini Brito, Judith Butler, Dilara Çalışkan, Christopher Chamberlin, Aobo Dong, Brigitte Fielder, Elizabeth Freeman, John S. Garrison, Nat Hurley, Joseph M. Pierce, Mark Rifkin, Poulomi Saha, Kath Weston
Chapter
The contributors to this volume assert the importance of queer kinship to queer and trans theory and to kinship theory. In a contemporary moment marked by the rising tides of neoliberalism, fascism, xenophobia, and homo- and cis-nationalism, they approach kinship as both a horizon and a source of violence and possibility. The contributors challenge dominant theories of kinship that ignore the devastating impacts of chattel slavery, settler colonialism, and racialized nationalism on the bonds of Black and Indigenous people and people of color. Among other topics, they examine the “blood tie” as the legal marker of kin relations, the everyday experiences and memories of trans mothers and daughters in Istanbul, the outsourcing of reproductive labor in postcolonial India, kinship as a model of governance beyond the liberal state, and the intergenerational effects of the adoption of Indigenous children as a technology of settler colonialism. Queer Kinship pushes the methodological and theoretical underpinnings of queer theory forward while opening up new paths for studying kinship. Contributors. Aqdas Aftab, Leah Claire Allen, Tyler Bradway, Juliana Demartini Brito, Judith Butler, Dilara Çalışkan, Christopher Chamberlin, Aobo Dong, Brigitte Fielder, Elizabeth Freeman, John S. Garrison, Nat Hurley, Joseph M. Pierce, Mark Rifkin, Poulomi Saha, Kath Weston
Chapter
The contributors to this volume assert the importance of queer kinship to queer and trans theory and to kinship theory. In a contemporary moment marked by the rising tides of neoliberalism, fascism, xenophobia, and homo- and cis-nationalism, they approach kinship as both a horizon and a source of violence and possibility. The contributors challenge dominant theories of kinship that ignore the devastating impacts of chattel slavery, settler colonialism, and racialized nationalism on the bonds of Black and Indigenous people and people of color. Among other topics, they examine the “blood tie” as the legal marker of kin relations, the everyday experiences and memories of trans mothers and daughters in Istanbul, the outsourcing of reproductive labor in postcolonial India, kinship as a model of governance beyond the liberal state, and the intergenerational effects of the adoption of Indigenous children as a technology of settler colonialism. Queer Kinship pushes the methodological and theoretical underpinnings of queer theory forward while opening up new paths for studying kinship. Contributors. Aqdas Aftab, Leah Claire Allen, Tyler Bradway, Juliana Demartini Brito, Judith Butler, Dilara Çalışkan, Christopher Chamberlin, Aobo Dong, Brigitte Fielder, Elizabeth Freeman, John S. Garrison, Nat Hurley, Joseph M. Pierce, Mark Rifkin, Poulomi Saha, Kath Weston
Chapter
The contributors to this volume assert the importance of queer kinship to queer and trans theory and to kinship theory. In a contemporary moment marked by the rising tides of neoliberalism, fascism, xenophobia, and homo- and cis-nationalism, they approach kinship as both a horizon and a source of violence and possibility. The contributors challenge dominant theories of kinship that ignore the devastating impacts of chattel slavery, settler colonialism, and racialized nationalism on the bonds of Black and Indigenous people and people of color. Among other topics, they examine the “blood tie” as the legal marker of kin relations, the everyday experiences and memories of trans mothers and daughters in Istanbul, the outsourcing of reproductive labor in postcolonial India, kinship as a model of governance beyond the liberal state, and the intergenerational effects of the adoption of Indigenous children as a technology of settler colonialism. Queer Kinship pushes the methodological and theoretical underpinnings of queer theory forward while opening up new paths for studying kinship. Contributors. Aqdas Aftab, Leah Claire Allen, Tyler Bradway, Juliana Demartini Brito, Judith Butler, Dilara Çalışkan, Christopher Chamberlin, Aobo Dong, Brigitte Fielder, Elizabeth Freeman, John S. Garrison, Nat Hurley, Joseph M. Pierce, Mark Rifkin, Poulomi Saha, Kath Weston
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The contributors to this volume assert the importance of queer kinship to queer and trans theory and to kinship theory. In a contemporary moment marked by the rising tides of neoliberalism, fascism, xenophobia, and homo- and cis-nationalism, they approach kinship as both a horizon and a source of violence and possibility. The contributors challenge dominant theories of kinship that ignore the devastating impacts of chattel slavery, settler colonialism, and racialized nationalism on the bonds of Black and Indigenous people and people of color. Among other topics, they examine the “blood tie” as the legal marker of kin relations, the everyday experiences and memories of trans mothers and daughters in Istanbul, the outsourcing of reproductive labor in postcolonial India, kinship as a model of governance beyond the liberal state, and the intergenerational effects of the adoption of Indigenous children as a technology of settler colonialism. Queer Kinship pushes the methodological and theoretical underpinnings of queer theory forward while opening up new paths for studying kinship. Contributors. Aqdas Aftab, Leah Claire Allen, Tyler Bradway, Juliana Demartini Brito, Judith Butler, Dilara Çalışkan, Christopher Chamberlin, Aobo Dong, Brigitte Fielder, Elizabeth Freeman, John S. Garrison, Nat Hurley, Joseph M. Pierce, Mark Rifkin, Poulomi Saha, Kath Weston
Chapter
The contributors to this volume assert the importance of queer kinship to queer and trans theory and to kinship theory. In a contemporary moment marked by the rising tides of neoliberalism, fascism, xenophobia, and homo- and cis-nationalism, they approach kinship as both a horizon and a source of violence and possibility. The contributors challenge dominant theories of kinship that ignore the devastating impacts of chattel slavery, settler colonialism, and racialized nationalism on the bonds of Black and Indigenous people and people of color. Among other topics, they examine the “blood tie” as the legal marker of kin relations, the everyday experiences and memories of trans mothers and daughters in Istanbul, the outsourcing of reproductive labor in postcolonial India, kinship as a model of governance beyond the liberal state, and the intergenerational effects of the adoption of Indigenous children as a technology of settler colonialism. Queer Kinship pushes the methodological and theoretical underpinnings of queer theory forward while opening up new paths for studying kinship. Contributors. Aqdas Aftab, Leah Claire Allen, Tyler Bradway, Juliana Demartini Brito, Judith Butler, Dilara Çalışkan, Christopher Chamberlin, Aobo Dong, Brigitte Fielder, Elizabeth Freeman, John S. Garrison, Nat Hurley, Joseph M. Pierce, Mark Rifkin, Poulomi Saha, Kath Weston
Chapter
The contributors to this volume assert the importance of queer kinship to queer and trans theory and to kinship theory. In a contemporary moment marked by the rising tides of neoliberalism, fascism, xenophobia, and homo- and cis-nationalism, they approach kinship as both a horizon and a source of violence and possibility. The contributors challenge dominant theories of kinship that ignore the devastating impacts of chattel slavery, settler colonialism, and racialized nationalism on the bonds of Black and Indigenous people and people of color. Among other topics, they examine the “blood tie” as the legal marker of kin relations, the everyday experiences and memories of trans mothers and daughters in Istanbul, the outsourcing of reproductive labor in postcolonial India, kinship as a model of governance beyond the liberal state, and the intergenerational effects of the adoption of Indigenous children as a technology of settler colonialism. Queer Kinship pushes the methodological and theoretical underpinnings of queer theory forward while opening up new paths for studying kinship. Contributors. Aqdas Aftab, Leah Claire Allen, Tyler Bradway, Juliana Demartini Brito, Judith Butler, Dilara Çalışkan, Christopher Chamberlin, Aobo Dong, Brigitte Fielder, Elizabeth Freeman, John S. Garrison, Nat Hurley, Joseph M. Pierce, Mark Rifkin, Poulomi Saha, Kath Weston
Chapter
The contributors to this volume assert the importance of queer kinship to queer and trans theory and to kinship theory. In a contemporary moment marked by the rising tides of neoliberalism, fascism, xenophobia, and homo- and cis-nationalism, they approach kinship as both a horizon and a source of violence and possibility. The contributors challenge dominant theories of kinship that ignore the devastating impacts of chattel slavery, settler colonialism, and racialized nationalism on the bonds of Black and Indigenous people and people of color. Among other topics, they examine the “blood tie” as the legal marker of kin relations, the everyday experiences and memories of trans mothers and daughters in Istanbul, the outsourcing of reproductive labor in postcolonial India, kinship as a model of governance beyond the liberal state, and the intergenerational effects of the adoption of Indigenous children as a technology of settler colonialism. Queer Kinship pushes the methodological and theoretical underpinnings of queer theory forward while opening up new paths for studying kinship. Contributors. Aqdas Aftab, Leah Claire Allen, Tyler Bradway, Juliana Demartini Brito, Judith Butler, Dilara Çalışkan, Christopher Chamberlin, Aobo Dong, Brigitte Fielder, Elizabeth Freeman, John S. Garrison, Nat Hurley, Joseph M. Pierce, Mark Rifkin, Poulomi Saha, Kath Weston
Chapter
The contributors to this volume assert the importance of queer kinship to queer and trans theory and to kinship theory. In a contemporary moment marked by the rising tides of neoliberalism, fascism, xenophobia, and homo- and cis-nationalism, they approach kinship as both a horizon and a source of violence and possibility. The contributors challenge dominant theories of kinship that ignore the devastating impacts of chattel slavery, settler colonialism, and racialized nationalism on the bonds of Black and Indigenous people and people of color. Among other topics, they examine the “blood tie” as the legal marker of kin relations, the everyday experiences and memories of trans mothers and daughters in Istanbul, the outsourcing of reproductive labor in postcolonial India, kinship as a model of governance beyond the liberal state, and the intergenerational effects of the adoption of Indigenous children as a technology of settler colonialism. Queer Kinship pushes the methodological and theoretical underpinnings of queer theory forward while opening up new paths for studying kinship. Contributors. Aqdas Aftab, Leah Claire Allen, Tyler Bradway, Juliana Demartini Brito, Judith Butler, Dilara Çalışkan, Christopher Chamberlin, Aobo Dong, Brigitte Fielder, Elizabeth Freeman, John S. Garrison, Nat Hurley, Joseph M. Pierce, Mark Rifkin, Poulomi Saha, Kath Weston
Chapter
The contributors to this volume assert the importance of queer kinship to queer and trans theory and to kinship theory. In a contemporary moment marked by the rising tides of neoliberalism, fascism, xenophobia, and homo- and cis-nationalism, they approach kinship as both a horizon and a source of violence and possibility. The contributors challenge dominant theories of kinship that ignore the devastating impacts of chattel slavery, settler colonialism, and racialized nationalism on the bonds of Black and Indigenous people and people of color. Among other topics, they examine the “blood tie” as the legal marker of kin relations, the everyday experiences and memories of trans mothers and daughters in Istanbul, the outsourcing of reproductive labor in postcolonial India, kinship as a model of governance beyond the liberal state, and the intergenerational effects of the adoption of Indigenous children as a technology of settler colonialism. Queer Kinship pushes the methodological and theoretical underpinnings of queer theory forward while opening up new paths for studying kinship. Contributors. Aqdas Aftab, Leah Claire Allen, Tyler Bradway, Juliana Demartini Brito, Judith Butler, Dilara Çalışkan, Christopher Chamberlin, Aobo Dong, Brigitte Fielder, Elizabeth Freeman, John S. Garrison, Nat Hurley, Joseph M. Pierce, Mark Rifkin, Poulomi Saha, Kath Weston
Chapter
The contributors to this volume assert the importance of queer kinship to queer and trans theory and to kinship theory. In a contemporary moment marked by the rising tides of neoliberalism, fascism, xenophobia, and homo- and cis-nationalism, they approach kinship as both a horizon and a source of violence and possibility. The contributors challenge dominant theories of kinship that ignore the devastating impacts of chattel slavery, settler colonialism, and racialized nationalism on the bonds of Black and Indigenous people and people of color. Among other topics, they examine the “blood tie” as the legal marker of kin relations, the everyday experiences and memories of trans mothers and daughters in Istanbul, the outsourcing of reproductive labor in postcolonial India, kinship as a model of governance beyond the liberal state, and the intergenerational effects of the adoption of Indigenous children as a technology of settler colonialism. Queer Kinship pushes the methodological and theoretical underpinnings of queer theory forward while opening up new paths for studying kinship. Contributors. Aqdas Aftab, Leah Claire Allen, Tyler Bradway, Juliana Demartini Brito, Judith Butler, Dilara Çalışkan, Christopher Chamberlin, Aobo Dong, Brigitte Fielder, Elizabeth Freeman, John S. Garrison, Nat Hurley, Joseph M. Pierce, Mark Rifkin, Poulomi Saha, Kath Weston
Chapter
The contributors to this volume assert the importance of queer kinship to queer and trans theory and to kinship theory. In a contemporary moment marked by the rising tides of neoliberalism, fascism, xenophobia, and homo- and cis-nationalism, they approach kinship as both a horizon and a source of violence and possibility. The contributors challenge dominant theories of kinship that ignore the devastating impacts of chattel slavery, settler colonialism, and racialized nationalism on the bonds of Black and Indigenous people and people of color. Among other topics, they examine the “blood tie” as the legal marker of kin relations, the everyday experiences and memories of trans mothers and daughters in Istanbul, the outsourcing of reproductive labor in postcolonial India, kinship as a model of governance beyond the liberal state, and the intergenerational effects of the adoption of Indigenous children as a technology of settler colonialism. Queer Kinship pushes the methodological and theoretical underpinnings of queer theory forward while opening up new paths for studying kinship. Contributors. Aqdas Aftab, Leah Claire Allen, Tyler Bradway, Juliana Demartini Brito, Judith Butler, Dilara Çalışkan, Christopher Chamberlin, Aobo Dong, Brigitte Fielder, Elizabeth Freeman, John S. Garrison, Nat Hurley, Joseph M. Pierce, Mark Rifkin, Poulomi Saha, Kath Weston
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This chapter examines Allison Bechdel’s first graphic memoir, Fun Home (2006), with additional material from its follow-up, Are You My Mother? (2012), and the prologue from The Essential Dykes to Watch Out For (2008), arguing that through the use of a queered mode of representation, Bechdel’s autobiographical narratives create queer “houses of memory,” (Jean-Pierre Wallot), as the vantage point from which to reconsider the childhood “fun home.” Her autobiographical narratives queer graphic memoirs specifically, through their visual/verbal hybridity, their non-linear approaches to temporality, and alternative constructions of the narrative around the self. They open a space where the vast archive of one’s life can be explored on the author’s own terms, apart from normative frameworks. The graphic memoir thus materializes a queer/ed home, rooted and mobile, a refuge against the processes of othering, objectification, marginalization, and exclusion endured by the author, a lab where the self is ceaselessly disassembled and recomposed, an archive that articulates the personal and collective aspects of queer and lesbian identities.
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This essay contests the antinarrative foundations of queer literary studies. Antinarrativity understands narrative as a conservative form that abets heteronormativity by imposing a coherence and linearity on subjectivity and meaning. By contrast, this essay reframes narrative as a relational form rife with affordances for figuring and sustaining queer bonds. I trace these affordances through contemporary queer kinship narratives, including Paul B. Preciado's Testo Junkie , Maggie Nelson's The Argonauts , and Renee Gladman's Calamities . These texts reveal unexpectedly queer potentials within address, contiguity, closure, and even linearity, which queer theory misses when it defines narrative as inherently teleological and when it locates queerness primarily in transgressive ruptures. This essay discovers queerness instead within mundane and messy attachments that endure across time and space. Queer narrative theory thus emerges in this essay as a relational formalism well-suited to debates about the shapes queerness takes now.
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Based on ethnographic research with transgender Latinas in Chicago, this article answers Susana Narotzky and Niko Besnier's (2014) invitation to think “economy otherwise.” I contend that in order to think “economy otherwise” we must think it queerly, and attend to feminist ways money animates possibilities beyond racist‐cisgenderism. I bring together economic anthropology, feminist anthropology, and queer of color critique to queer money, specifically money earned from sexual labor performed by transgender Latinas. An ethnographic examination of trans Latina sex workers’ lives reveals that money accessed through sexual labor is assigned a number of queer and contested meanings. Its' use is based in feminist ethics that eschew dominant economic logics in favor of building relations of care. It enables the creation of transgender bodies, and the development of queer networks of care with biological and chosen kin, in the U.S. and beyond. Trans Latinas, then, use money from sex work to support trans Latina ways of being that exceed the racist‐cisgenderism. Sometimes, however, their uses of money reinforce racist‐cisgenderism. I argue that the women's fraught uses of money reveal the complex intersections that sustain racist‐cisgenderism, and how they are experienced and negotiated in people's everyday lives.
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This chapter is a methodological rumination on a porous and cruisy genre of autotheoretical writing, which is subsequently illustrated in a constellation of scenes. Its fragmented form affords a capacious scenography of Berlin, one that is receptive to affective passage and emotional traffic; nurtures imaginal and hauntological dimensions of the field; and indulges critical intimacies with other times, other places. Thin, cruisy, queer is an illustration of how genres of memory and intimacy are attendant with modes of inter-subjective knowing in the field as much as such writing’s porous, non-linear and partial constitution helps trouble ethnographic habits around form, content and knowledge epistemes. Writing through affect is writing that takes us beyond capture or holding, to what lies in excess or exists beside, in-between and alongside, or to that what impinges on life obliquely or is given in the interface of inward and external modes, subjectively and piecemeal.
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Futuring trans* is a deliberation on the emergence of transgender alongside khwajasara, both newer terms in Pakistan that acquire distinctly temporal agencies insofar as these untether individuals from difficult histories and offer new affective means for future making. Not the same as the identity transgender, trans* in Pakistan, this article proposes, is a baggy and emergent ground where not only locally specific meanings around gender variability are being pushed out and projected anew but where its historical, trans-local, cross-scalar, and open-ended working out is mappable. To outline its futural shapes, this text closely traces a set of affective, representational, and practical strategies as part of an unfinished, contested, and dynamic process of encounters across a variety of allies and actors: individuals, institutions, collectives, spaces, and networks. It illustrates, on the one hand, how trans* in Pakistan kicks off a capacious contact zone, triggers cross-sectional encounters, and generates momentum with implications, which impact but also exceed local conditions. On the other hand, it observes how its horizons might be curtailed by conditions and concerns that privilege some ways of gender nonconforming over certain others.
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In this introduction, we propose the notion of ‘embodied belonging’ as a fruitful analytical heuristic for scholars in medical and psychological anthropology. We envision this notion to help us gain a more nuanced understanding of the entanglements of the political, social, and affective dimensions of belonging and their effects on health, illness, and healing. A focus on embodied belonging, we argue, reveals how displacement, exclusion, and marginalization cause existential and health-related ruptures in people’s lives and bodies, and how affected people, in the struggle for re/emplacement and re/integration, may regain health and sustain their well-being. Covering a variety of regional contexts (Germany/Vietnam, Norway, the UK, Japan), the contributions to this special issue examine how embodied non/belonging is experienced, re/imagined, negotiated, practiced, disrupted, contested, and achieved (or not) by their protagonists, who are excluded and marginalized in diverse ways. Each article highlights the intricate trajectories of how dynamics of non/belonging inscribe themselves in human bodies. They also reveal how belonging can be utilized and drawn on as a forceful means and resource of social resilience, if not (self-)therapy and healing.
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This article draws on three narratives from a Canadian research project on LGBTQ people and fertility clinics to illustrate how LGBTQ bodies, identities and family configurations are frequently misrecognized and unintelligible in the fertility clinic context. The flow of the patient through the clinic is disrupted by the inability of clinic staff to disentangle the assumptive links made between body parts, gametes, gender, sex, sexual orientation, sexual practice and family configuration. The author explores how the ‘gender and kinship labour’ and processes of objectification that typically operate in the fertility clinic to bolster conventional masculinities and femininities break down in relation to queer and trans bodies, and offers the beginnings of a framework to assist practitioners, and others, to conceptualize and work more effectively with LGBTQ people.
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People in American society have been changing the way they live in a variety of ways since World War II. In this paper (and in greater detail in my dissertation) I am arguing that lesbians are one group of people who are creating new kinds of relationships in which we live our daily lives, and which we call family. These include changes in spousal and parental relationships and in kinship networks. As an anthropologist I see myself documenting these changes as they occur. Obviously the project is not completed. This paper represents an intermediate stage in my research, as I begin to see some patterns emerge and to construct my conceptualization of the project. My research has significance to people outside of anthropology, most notably lesbian rights attorneys who are advocating the recognition of our relationships by the legal system, and psychotherapists who are helping lesbians deal with the emotional stress of living outside of the social structure. I hope that they can both learn something from my research and contribute to my understanding. I see my work as not only academic, but would like it to contribute to the movement for lesbian rights, and to help individual women to find peace and happiness in their lives.