A role for the membrane proteome in human chronic kidney disease erythrocytes

ArticleinTranslational Research 160(5):374-83 · July 2012with21 Reads
Impact Factor: 5.03 · DOI: 10.1016/j.trsl.2012.06.004 · Source: PubMed

    Abstract

    The molecular basis of the reduced half-life of chronic kidney disease (CKD) erythrocytes is unclear. The erythrocyte membrane plays a key role in the erythrocyte mechanical properties and survival. The aim of the present work is to uncover erythrocyte membrane proteins whose expression could be altered in CKD. The erythrocyte membrane subproteome was analyzed by a non-biased approach where the whole set of proteins was simultaneously investigated by 2D fluorescence difference gel electrophoresis without preselection of potential targets. Proteins significantly altered in CKD were identified by mass spectrometry (MS) and results validation was performed by Western blot and confocal microscopy. Nine differentially expressed spots among healthy individuals, non-dialyzed CKD and erythropoietin/dialysis-treated CKD patients were identified by MS/MS corresponding to 5 proteins (beta-adducin, HSP71/72, tropomodulin-1, ezrin, and radixin). Ezrin and radixin were higher in dialyzed CKD patients than in the other 2 groups. Beta-adducin was increased in CKD patients (dialyzed or not). Three spots were normalized in patients on the dialysis/erythropoietin combination compared with non-dialyzed CKD. Among these, a spot corresponding to tropomodulin 1, was found to be of higher abundance in non-dialyzed CKD patients compared with controls or dialyzed CKD. In conclusion, this study identifies changes in erythrocyte membrane proteins in CKD, which may be relevant for the pathogenesis of red cell abnormalities in uremia.