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Household appliance noise

Authors:
  • H G Leventhall
Article

Household appliance noise

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Noise spectra of eighteen commonly-used household appliances are given, up to ten models of each type being studied. Measurements were taken in acoustically-simulated average domestic rooms and in situ.The present paper is confined to a study of appliance noise levels over which the user can exercise little or no direct control. This excludes televisions, radios and record players, which are regulated by the user.The noisiest room in the house is normally the kitchen, with appliance noise levels ranging from about 40 to 90 dB(A). Living-room appliances are much quieter, heating devices ranging between about 35 and 50 dB(A). Appliances used in the bathroom are not generally as noisy as those used in the kitchen, but require some redesign to reduce the noise to more acceptable levels.
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Co~h" ~['practice [or reducinf, the exposure of employed persons to noise
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DEPARTMENT OF EMPLOYMEN 1", Co~h" ~['practice [or reducinf,, the exposure of employed persons to noise, HMSO, 1972.
Noise source impact in: con~,truction:buildings/homes
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COMMtTTEE ON THE PROBLI. M OJ: NOISE, Noise final report, Command 2056, paragraph 139, HMSO, 1963, 6. E. K. BENDER, Noise source impact in: con~,truction:buildings/homes, Sollnd arid Vibration, 7 (1973), pp. 33 41.
A proposed method for assessing the noise of domestic appliances and its comparison with existing procedures
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G. M. JA('KSON, A proposed method for assessing the noise of domestic appliances and its comparison with existing procedures, Ph.D. Thesis, University of London, 1972.
An exhibition at the Design Centre
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