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A web-accessible dictionary of Southeastern Pomo

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In recent years, building web-accessible dictionaries has become a new way of organizing and publishing data from linguistic fieldwork on indigenous languages. This paper provides an overview of one such online dictionary. The language we worked on was Southeastern Pomo, an endangered native American language which was historically spoken in the area of Clear Lake, California. The structure of the dictionary and the files that are needed to construct it are introduced in detail. We also demonstrate three types of searches that are made available on the dictionary website.
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A Web-Accessible Dictionary of Southeastern Pomo
Yao Yao, Charles B. Chang, Shira Katseff,
Russell Lee-Goldman, and Marta Piqueras-Brunet*
University of California, Berkeley
1203 Dwinelle Hall, Berkeley, CA 94720-2650, USA
yaoyao@berkeley.edu, cbchang@berkeley.edu, skatseff@berkeley.edu,
rleegold@berkeley.edu, marta.piqs@gmail.com
Abstract
In recent years, building web-accessible dictionaries has become a new way of organizing and
publishing data from linguistic fieldwork on indigenous languages. This paper provides an
overview of one such online dictionary. The language we worked on was Southeastern Pomo,
an endangered native American language which was historically spoken in the area of Clear
Lake, California. The structure of the dictionary and the files that are needed to construct it
are introduced in detail. We also demonstrate three types of searches that are made available
on the dictionary website.
Keywords: online dictionary, language documentation, native American languages.
1. Background
In the past decade, as resources for linguistic analysis have entered cyberspace, so
have the products of linguistic documentation. Online dictionaries have been created for
a number of languages native to the Americas, including Yurok, Hupa, Washo, and
Northern Paiute (cf. Babel et al. 2006, Dick and Haynes 2006). These online
dictionaries make the information gathered through fieldwork accessible to researchers,
tribe members, and in particular, young learners. In this paper, we present our work on
an online dictionary for another native American language, Southeastern Pomo, with the
goal of providing an overview for the linguistic fieldwork community of the technical
details involved in building an online dictionary website.
* For their help, feedback, and support throughout the course of this project, we are grateful to Jocelyn
Ahlers, Zhenya Antić, Catherine Callaghan, Thera Crane, Donna Fenton, Andrew Garrett, Robert Geary,
Hannah Haynie, Leanne Hinton, Jisup Hong, Loretta Kelsey, Julius Moshinsky, Lindsey Newbold,
Ronald Sprouse, Maziar Toosarvandani, Corey Yoquelet, the audience at CIL 18, and the Department of
Linguistics at the University of California, Berkeley. Any errors remain our own.
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1.1. The Southeastern Pomo dictionary project
Southeastern Pomo (Northern Hokan, Pomoan) is an acutely endangered
language historically spoken in the area around Clear Lake, California (Moshinsky 1974,
Gordon 2005, cf. Figure 1).
Figure 1. Locations of the Southeastern Pomo speech communities (from Haynie 2007)
Speakers and learners are mostly affiliated with the Elem Pomo Tribe. Today only
two fluent speakers remain. However, revitalization efforts are underway, led by Loretta
Kelsey, one of the two remaining speakers, and Robert Geary (cf. Shavelson 2006,
Fagan 2007). Through collaboration with linguists, they have developed a community
orthography, teaching materials, and a print dictionary with pictures of local flora and
fauna. Language camps have also been organized for people to learn the language.
The present online dictionary is another component of this revitalization work.
We started working with Kelsey and Geary in the fall of 2006, and have so far elicited
hundreds of hours of data comprising word lists, sentences, and texts. In order to
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organize and publish the data in the most efficient and user-friendly way, we constructed
a web-accessible dictionary. The dictionary has three main functions: searching for
words, searching for audio files, and searching for sentences/texts.
1.2. Transcribing the sounds of Southeastern Pomo
Southeastern Pomo (henceforth, SEP) has a rich inventory of consonants covering
a wide range of places of articulation, including labial, dental, alveolar, velar, post-velar,
and glottal. In addition to a voiced/voiceless laryngeal distinction, the language also has
a series of ejectives (both in stops and affricates). Table 1 below shows the inventory of
consonant phones, as well as our practical ASCII orthography (which differs in some
respects from the community orthography) in parentheses underneath the IPA forms.
LABIAL
DENTAL
ALVEOLAR
PALATAL
VELAR
GLOTTAL
STOP
p p’ b
(p p’ b)
t̪ t̪
(th th’)
t t’ d
(t t’ d)
k k’
(k k’)
ʔ
(7)
AFFRICATE
ts ts’
(ts ts’)
tʃ tʃ’
(ch ch’)
FRICATIVE
f
(f)
s
(s)
ʃ
(sh)
x
(x)
h
(h)
NASAL
m
(m)
n
(n)
ŋ
(ng)
FLAP
ɾ
(r)
APPROXIMANT
w
(w)
l
(l)
j
(y)
Table 1. Consonant inventory of Southeastern Pomo
The vowel inventory of SEP is much simpler. The language basically has a five-
vowel system, with an additional schwa that appears predictably in epenthetic positions
(and therefore is not spelled out in our orthography). Table 2 shows the vowel system
together with the orthography in parentheses beside the IPA forms.
FRONT
CENTRAL
BACK
HIGH
ɪ (i)
ʊ (u)
MID
ɛ (e)
ə
o (o)
LOW
a (a)
Table 2. Vowel inventory of Southeastern Pomo
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2. Dictionary Structure
The online dictionary is composed of three subparts: a lexicon, an audio
dictionary, and a text archive.
2.1. Lexicon
The lexicon contains entries for individual words, affixes, and fixed expressions.
Each entry displays the following information about an item: (1) its SEP transcription,
(2) its part of speech, (3) an English gloss, and (4) links to sound clips in the audio
dictionary (if available). Different lexicon entries correspond to different forms, but not
necessarily different lexemes (e.g. different morphological forms of a verb get separate,
though linked, entries).
2.2. Audio dictionary
In addition to the lexicon, there is a separate audio dictionary. Each entry in the
audio dictionary corresponds to an audio file clipped out of master field recordings to
correspond to a lexicon entry. An entry in the audio dictionary displays the following
information about an item: (1) its SEP transcription, (2) an English gloss, (3) the name
of the speaker who produced the item, (4) a link to the corresponding lexicon entry, and
(5) a reference to its source, i.e. the filename of the master field recording together with
the time point within it at which the relevant audio begins (for developers).
The audio dictionary is independent of the lexicon, but corresponding lexical
entries and sound clippings are linked to each other from both sides. The two
dictionaries are kept apart for the purposes of facilitating two different types of searches
word searches and audio searches (see §4).
2.3. Text archive
The text archive contains entries for elicited sentences, narratives, and other
discourse above the sentence level. Each entry displays the following information about
an item: (1) the name of the speaker who produced the text, (2) the genre of the text, (3)
transcriptions of individual sentences, (4) free translations, and (5) interlinear glosses.
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3. Building the Website
In this section, we briefly review the construction of the website, in terms of data
preparation and storage, query processing, and results display.
In the preparation stage, fieldwork recordings are manually processed and
clippings of individual words, sentences, and texts are saved individually. Meanwhile,
information about these data is entered into three separate databases corresponding to
the subparts of the dictionary. Lexicon entries are first entered into a mySQL database
and then converted into a grand XML (eXtensible Markup Language) file, while
information about audio clippings and texts is entered into separate XML files directly.
The mySQL database of lexicon entries has the following fields:
SEP transcription
transcriptions of variants (if any)
community orthography (if available)
part of speech
free gloss & interlinear gloss
semantic domain
source file & start time
links to other morphologically related entries
notes
The mySQL database has a number of desirable features. For one, it automatically
generates an unique ID number for each new entry, and is fully sortable and searchable.
It also allows several researchers to make and edit entries at the same time without
overwriting each other’s work. In addition, the database can be easily converted into
XML format, which is essentially a text file with all the above information in a fixed
format. Figure 2 below shows a sample entry in the lexicon XML file. As shown below,
the SEP word kachuchu (ID = 101) is transcribed as kuchechoo in the community
orthography. It is a noun; means cap in English; belongs to the semantic domain of
clothes; and is a headword. Furthermore, it was first elicited in the recording named
21sep06_LK1b, at time 18:39.
The information in the audio dictionary and the text archive is stored in XML
files directly, in a similar format as the lexicon XML file. Thus, all the information
contained in the dictionary is stored in three separate XML files: one for the lexicon,
one for the audio files, and one for the texts. Such a text-based file format allows the
data to be easily manipulated into other formats as the technology of documentation
changes over time.
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<lemma>
<id>101</id>
<lx>kachuchu</lx>
<community_orthography>kuchechoo</community_orthography>
<ps>n</ps>
<ge>cap</ge>
<short-gloss>cap</short-gloss>
<ref>21sep06_LK1b</ref>
<time>18:39</time>
<sd>clothes</sd>
<is-headword>yes</is-headword>
</lemma>
Figure 2. Sample XML for a lexicon entry
Separate XSL (eXtensible Stylesheet Language) files are written to process search
queries and control the display of the results. The function of the XSL files is essentially
to decide what information from the XML files needs to be retrieved in response to a
certain query and how the retrieved information should be formatted on screen. It
should be noted that by having separate XML and XSL files, we are able to separate
data processing from data storage, which prevents accidental data overwriting and also
allows more flexibility in data processing and display.
To sum up, all relevant information in the dictionary is saved in XML files, and
the processing is taken care of by XSL stylesheets. Figure 3 illustrates the data flow in
the processing of an incoming query.
QUERY XSL DISPLAY
XML
Figure 3. Illustration of query processing
4. Dictionary Searches
In this section, we demonstrate three types of searches handled on the dictionary
website: word search, audio search, and text search. As mentioned above, the three sub-
dictionaries are stored separately, but cross-linking between any two is possible.
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4.1. Word search
Lexicon entries can be searched using up to three search criteria: SEP
transcription, English gloss, and semantic domain. Users can also choose whether
affixes are to be included in the search. Figure 4 demonstrates a search for lexicon
entries for which the English glosses contain the word black.
Figure 4. Web interface for a sample lexicon search
Figure 5. Results of a search for words with English glosses containing black (entry k7afal selected)
Five lexicon entries are returned by the query, and their SEP transcriptions and
English glosses are shown in the left pane of the results page (cf. Figure 5 above). Upon
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clicking on an individual entry in this list, say k7afal ‘blackbird’, the full entry for the
word and a link to the corresponding audio file will appear in the main pane on the right.
4.2. Audio search
Audio clippings can be searched by SEP transcription, English gloss, speaker, or
any combination of the three.
Figure 6. Web interface for a sample audio search
Figure 7. Results of a search for words with the segment sequence -ka- spoken by speaker John Kelsey
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As a demonstration, if the user searches for all sound clippings of words with -ka-
in their transcription that are spoken by John Kelsey (cf. Figure 6), six search results
will be found and displayed (cf. Figure 7). Each search result can be clicked to play the
audio, and a link is provided below the audio entry to the corresponding lexicon entry.
4.3. Text search
Finally, users can also search for texts using multiple search criteria.
Figure 8. Web interface for a sample text search
Figure 9. Results of a search for elicited sentences containing hekath7e from speaker Loretta Kelsey
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On the text search page, users can search by the SEP/English words contained in the
text, text genre (dialogue, elicited sentences, procedural text, remarks, and stories), or
speaker. We demonstrate a sample search for elicited sentences that contain the SEP
word hekath7e ‘how’ and are spoken by Loretta Kelsey (cf. Figure 8 above).
Three instances are found and displayed on the results page (cf. Figure 9 above).
Each sentence is listed with the English translation and references to the original
elicitation file and sound clipping. A full context link can be clicked to view the whole
text with detailed interlinear glosses. Figure 10 below shows the full text page for the
third search result theak kwik hekath7e? ‘How are your children?’, with detailed glosses
(the original search result sentence appears in red).
Figure 10. Full text page for the selected sentence theak kwik hekath7e How are your children?
with detailed glosses. The selected sentence is in red.
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5. Concluding Remarks
In this paper, we presented our work on an online dictionary for Southeastern
Pomo. Specifically, we introduced the structure of the dictionary and demonstrated how
the data are stored and processed on the website. We also showed the search interface of
the website and demonstrated sample queries. However, this only represents the first
step of the dictionary project. In the near future, we plan to develop and improve the
dictionary website in the following ways. First, the data structure of the lexicon data file
needs to be more elaborated (e.g. with nested structure) in order to accommodate
polysemy more neatly. Second, the data of the print dictionary will be merged with that
of the online dictionary, and all entries will be updated with their spelling in the Elem
orthography. Third, different types of multimedia (e.g. photos of local flora and fauna,
videos of the actions described by verbs of motion and placement) will be added to
make the dictionary more informative and easier to use. Our ultimate goal, however, is
to make the dictionary website widely accessible to teachers and learners so that they
can make regular use of it as a CALL (Computer-Aided Language Learning) tool.
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Babel, Molly, Andrew Garrett, Erin Haynes, Michael Houser, Reiko Kataoka, Fanny Liu, Nicole Marcus, Ruth Rouvier, Ronald Sprouse, Ange Strom-Weber, and Maziar Toosarvandani. 2006. A web-accessible Mono Lake Paiute dictionary and text archive. Paper presented at the Friends of Uto-Aztecan Conference. Salt Lake City, UT, University of Utah, August 24.
Only living Elem Pomo speaker teaches so she won't be the last
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Fagan, Kevin. 2007. Only living Elem Pomo speaker teaches so she won't be the last.
California tribe tries to save its language Voice of America News
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Shavelson, Lonny. 2006. California tribe tries to save its language. Voice of America News, March 30. http://www.voanews.com/english/archive/2006-03/2006-03-30- voa46. cfm?CFID=88126261&CFTOKEN=81958375. Retrieved 1 October 2006. --22 88 33 55
A Grammar of Southeastern Pomo (University of California --22
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