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Handbook of Research on New Literacies

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DESCRIPTION The nature of literacy is rapidly changing as new information and communication technologies, such as the Internet, rapidly generate new literacies required to effectively exploit their potential for reading, writing, and communication (Bruce, 2003; Lankshear & Knobel, 2003; Leu, Kinzer, Coiro, & Cammack, 2004). Scholars from diverse disciplines, ranging from cognitive science (Gee, 2003; Mayer, 2001) to sociolinguistics (Cope & Kalantzis, 2000, 2003; Gee, 2004; Kress, 2003; Lemke, 1998) to cultural anthropology (Markham, 1998; Street, 2003; Thomas, forthcoming), have begun to recognize changes to literacy as they begin to study the consequences of these changes for their individual areas of study. As many new heuristics appear to inform this multidisciplinary work, a new perspective about the nature of literacy is beginning to emerge. This perspective, often referred to as "new literacies," is still in its initial stages but it is clear to most that it will be a powerful one, redefining what it means to be literate in the 21 st century. The construct "new literacies" means many different things to many different people. However, most would agree there are at least three defining characteristics of this perspective: 1. new literacies are central to full civic, economic, and personal participation in a globalized community and, as a result, are critical to educational research and the education of all of our students; 2. new literacies are deictic – they regularly change as their defining technologies change; 3. new literacies are multifaceted – they benefit from analysis that brings multiple points of view to the discussion. The purpose of this volume is to provide a central vehicle for directing research in this area. It will provide a single location to review the research from multiple lenses in multiple areas of investigation. Such a volume is critically important to help develop the multifaceted perspective necessary to inform educational research that might improve instruction as new technologies define even newer literacies that will be central to our lives in a global information society. The Handbook of Research on New Literacies will bring together leading scholars from around the world to review the research in their area, from the perspectives they find to provide the greatest insight into the questions that they address. We expect the Handbook of Research on New Literacies to provide the central leadership for this newly emerging field, directing scholars to the major issues, theoretical perspectives, and interdisciplinary research on new literacies.
Handbook of Research on New Literacies, Oct04
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HANDBOOK OF RESEARCH ON NEW LITERACIES
Editors
Donald J. Leu, Jr. University of Connecticut
Julie Coiro, University of Connecticut
Michele Knobel, Montclair State University, New Jersey
Colin Lankshear, James Cook University (to be confirmed)
A book proposal submitted to Lawrence Erlbaum Associates, Inc.
Handbook of Research on New Literacies, Oct04
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DESCRIPTION
The nature of literacy is rapidly changing as new information and communication technologies,
such as the Internet, rapidly generate new literacies required to effectively exploit their potential
for reading, writing, and communication (Bruce, 2003; Lankshear & Knobel, 2003; Leu, Kinzer,
Coiro, & Cammack, 2004). Scholars from diverse disciplines, ranging from cognitive science
(Gee, 2003; Mayer, 2001) to sociolinguistics (Cope & Kalantzis, 2000, 2003; Gee, 2004; Kress,
2003; Lemke, 1998) to cultural anthropology (Markham, 1998; Street, 2003; Thomas,
forthcoming), have begun to recognize changes to literacy as they begin to study the
consequences of these changes for their individual areas of study. As many new heuristics appear
to inform this multidisciplinary work, a new perspective about the nature of literacy is beginning
to emerge. This perspective, often referred to as “new literacies,” is still in its initial stages but it
is clear to most that it will be a powerful one, redefining what it means to be literate in the 21st
century.
The construct “new literacies” means many different things to many different people. However,
most would agree there are at least three defining characteristics of this perspective:
1. new literacies are central to full civic, economic, and personal participation in a
globalized community and, as a result, are critical to educational research and the
education of all of our students;
2. new literacies are deictic – they regularly change as their defining technologies change;
3. new literacies are multifaceted – they benefit from analysis that brings multiple points of
view to the discussion.
The purpose of this volume is to provide a central vehicle for directing research in this area. It
will provide a single location to review the research from multiple lenses in multiple areas of
investigation. Such a volume is critically important to help develop the multifaceted perspective
necessary to inform educational research that might improve instruction as new technologies
define even newer literacies that will be central to our lives in a global information society. The
Handbook of Research on New Literacies will bring together leading scholars from around the
world to review the research in their area, from the perspectives they find to provide the greatest
insight into the questions that they address. We expect the Handbook of Research on New
Literacies to provide the central leadership for this newly emerging field, directing scholars to
the major issues, theoretical perspectives, and interdisciplinary research on new literacies.
Citations
Bruce, B. C. ed. (2003). Literacy in the information age: Inquiries into meaning-making with
new technologies. Newark, DE: International Reading Association.
Cope, B. & Kalantzis, M. (eds.) (2000). Multiliteracies. London, UK: Routledge.
Cope, B. & Kalantzis, M. (2003). Text-made text. Melbourne, AU: Common Ground.
Gee, J. (2003). What video games have to teach us about learning and literacy. New York, NY:
Palgrave MacMillan.
Handbook of Research on New Literacies, Oct04
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Gee, J. (2004). Situated language and learning: A critique of traditional schooling. New York,
NY: Routledge.
Kress, G. (2003). Literacy in the new media age. London, UK: Routledge.
Lankshear, C. & Knobel, M. (2003). New literacies. Maidenhead: Open University Press.
Lemke, J. L. (1998). Metamedia Literacy: Transforming Meanings and Media. In D. Reinking,
M.C. McKenna, L. D. Labbo, & R.D. Kieffer (Eds.), Handbook of literacy and
technology: Transformations in a post-typographic world (pp. 283-301). Mahwah, NJ:
Erlbaum.
Leu, D.J., Jr., Kinzer, C.K., Coiro, J., Cammack, D. (2004). Toward a theory of new literacies
emerging from the Internet and other information and communication technologies. In
R.B. Ruddell & N. Unrau (Eds.), Theoretical models and processes of reading, fifth
edition (1568-1611). International Reading Association: Newark, DE.
Markham, A. (1998). Life online. Walnut Creek, CA: AltaMira Press.
Mayer, R. (2001). Multimedia learning. Cambridge, UK: Cambridge University Press.
Street, B. (2003). What’s new in new literacy studies. Current issues in comparative education.
5(2), 1-14.
Thomas, A. (forthcoming). e-selves | e-literacies | e-worlds: Children’s literacies and identities
in virtual communities. New York, NY: Peter Lang.
AUDIENCE
The audience for this volume includes the literacy research community, broadly conceived. This
includes scholars from the traditional reading and writing research communities in education and
educational psychology as well as scholars from information science, cognitive science,
psychology, sociolinguistics, computer mediated communication, and other related areas that
find literacy to be an important area of investigation. Important additional audiences include
libraries and graduate students. Finally, given the recent movement towards research-based
reading instruction and policy initiatives, there will also be an important audience among school
administrators and policy makers who are seeking summaries of the latest research to inform
their actions.
Just as issues of reading attracted a broad collection of researchers, from many disciplines, in the
last two decades of the 20th century, we believe a similar phenomenon is taking place now with
new literacies. As literacy and technology converge, many scholars are now moving their
research into this area since the emerging constructs appear to inform their own work in
powerful ways and since the potential for influencing education appears so great. Most
individuals recognize that these new literacies will be central to all literacy and learning issues in
Handbook of Research on New Literacies, Oct04
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the 21st century. Thus, we see this as a potentially large market that will only increase over time.
We seek to make this the defining volume for this newly emerging field.
APPROACH AND SCOPE
A central assumption of this handbook is that we need to make visible the multiple perspectives
and theoretical frames that currently drive work in new literacies. Each contributor will be asked
to clearly establish what they consider to be the central questions in the area they represent,
define the theoretical framework they find to be the most powerful for research on this issue, and
explain why they choose this lens over others. Then, they will be asked to comprehensively
review the research on the issues they explore; drawing conclusions for teaching and learning, or
education policy more broadly defined, where these are possible. Finally, they will be asked to
identify essential next questions.
Authors have been selected on the basis of their leadership and/or innovative research in their
special area of investigation. Each has a clearly established reputation in his/her research area.
We include leaders from the areas of social semiotics and multimodality, online research
methodology, multimedia studies, computer-mediated communication, e-learning and learning
management, reading comprehension research, child and adolescent literacy studies, and other
areas of important inquiry.
Following an introduction by the editors, reviews of research will be clustered into six sections:
methodology, knowledge and inquiry, communication, popular culture, citizenship in a
globalized world, instructional practices and assessment. A unique, seventh section will consist
of commentary by leaders in the area of new literacies research on articles that have been
identified by section contributors as central to the fields in which they work. Each contributor to
the volume will nominate what he or she considers to be the most important study in the area
represented by his or her section. The editors will review all nominations and select one from
each section. Then, two leaders in new literacy research will critique one of these studies and
provide analytic commentaries on how that study teaches us important lessons about additional,
new research that must be conducted in the future. In this way the book will make a valuable
contribution to postgraduate training in research scholarship by modeling the practice of critical
review of literature in relation to central texts.
OUTSTANDING FEATURES
Several aspects of this volume make it stand out from others:
Two of the most important areas in educational research are literacy and technology. A
handbook at the intersection of these two areas will draw upon the potential of each area
while carving out important new territory, establishing a leadership position in an
important, emerging area.
Each of the authors is a pioneering leader in his/her area of study.
Rather than imposing a theoretical structure on this emerging area, this handbook seeks to
support the development of a rich array of theoretical perspectives to inform future
research.
Handbook of Research on New Literacies, Oct04
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“New Literacies” is strongly contested terrain and “players” at many locations within the
overall endeavor of educational research have a stake in ongoing debate and
developments in the area. This book will be an important catalyst in informing the debate
and keeping it productively open.
Collectively, the authors represent the widest possible combination of research traditions
and theoretical perspectives.
The final section is unique. No other volume, let alone handbook, includes research
exemplars and then has preeminent individuals from around the world critique these
studies, discussing how each leads us to important new investigations, both in terms of
methodology as well as the next questions that need to be explored. This feature will
provide an important model of critical analysis for emerging scholars in this area.
The editors include both leaders in this area of research as well as emerging young
scholars who have made a significant mark in the field. We believe it is essential to
include the voices and perspective of our next generation of scholars in this area since
younger scholars are quickly gravitating to research in this area.
Once the draft chapters have been reviewed and previewed by the editors, a core of the
contributors will meet for a working conference to enhance the scope, internal coherence,
and quality of the final text.
The book will make a strong pitch to public and education policy developers by including
work that situates trends in the emergence, evolution, and importance of new literacies in
relation to contemporary directions in formal schooling – which tend to respond to new
literacies by either ignoring them or by trying to compress them into established school
ways. Both responses are educationally counterproductive and contribute to the worrying
levels of student disengagement that are widely acknowledged.
The collection readily lends itself to the possibility of developing a companion website
that includes regularly updated links to new research within each of the 6 focus areas
addressed in this volume. The website could also host a forum for ongoing discussions
about new literacies.
COMPETING VOLUMES
There are no volumes currently published that compete with this proposed collection. The
closest handbooks in adjacent areas include the Handbook of Reading Research and the
Handbook of Literacy and Technology. Each, however, looks at issues outside the specific area
of this project. The former focuses almost exclusively on the reading of traditional, printed text.
The Handbook of Literacy and Technology looks at many issues but lacks a general theoretical
framework that captures the changes that are taking place, and so focuses substantially on
software tools used to support traditional literacies and other issues that are framed in a more
traditional fashion. Editors of the volume proposed here have authored chapters in each of these
other handbooks.
MARKET CONSIDERATIONS
This volume will be highly appropriate for graduate classes on literacy, literacy and technology
and new literacies. Indeed, we envisage the book becoming an integral text for postgraduate
research programs at the intersection of literacy, technology and learning. The book will be of
interest to researchers, graduate students, school administrators, public policy makers, and
Handbook of Research on New Literacies, Oct04
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libraries. As the defining volume in a new and rapidly expanding area, it will have a substantial
presence in the marketplace. A conference that includes some of the major authors will be held at
the University of Connecticut in early July, 2005 to bring additional visibility and interest in the
volume. We expect to also present symposiums around this volume at the National Reading
Conference in 2005 and at AERA in 2006.
Finally, we believe that the special, final section, with analytic commentary accompanying the
most important studies in the field, holds a unique and dynamic marketing opportunity. We
believe this section may be pulled out of the volume and marketed as a separate volume to
graduate students and to graduate courses in literacy research (much in the manner of what was
done by Sage with the Handbook of Qualitative Research edited by Denzin & Lincoln). Having
the keenest minds share their analysis of the best studies in the field will provide graduate
students with a unique model for seeing into the thought processes of leaders in literacy research.
APPARATUS
We are proposing a volume of around 700 bound pages (or 1725 mss pages) based on the
following calculations: 35 chapters and an Introduction, each of 15 pages at 800+ words per page
(for average chapter lengths of 12,000 words including references), plus five previously
published articles that are central to the development of new literacies as a research field and for
which we will obtain permission to reprint. Each article will be accompanied by two
commentaries of no more then 5,000 words in length each.
STATUS OF THE BOOK AND TIMELINE
The selection of contributors and chapter topics has been tentatively completed and is listed in
this proposal. There may be some slight modifications given the usual exigencies that often
occur in complex projects of this type. Most of these authors have been notified and have agreed
to the project. All authors listed below with an asterisk beside their name have written and
agreed to write chapters to our timeline. Some have begun writing. The proposed timeline for
this project is listed below:
December 1, 2004 Contract negotiations completed and contract signed.
January 1, 2005 Final invitations sent out and final chapters agreed to by editors and
authors.
May 1, 2005 First draft manuscripts submitted and in hand.
July 1, 2005 Revision requests submitted to all authors.
July 1, 2005 New Literacies Conference to be held on the campus of the University of
Connecticut. This will include researchers, selected authors, teachers,
superintendents, and policy makers.
September 1, 2005 Final revisions are due for all chapters.
January 1, 2006 Complete manuscript submitted to the publisher.
Handbook of Research on New Literacies, Oct04
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ORGANIZATION OF THE BOOK
(An asterisk beside author name/team indicates that the author has agreed to contribute the specified
chapter)
CONTENTS
FOREWORD
PREFACE
ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS
I. INTRODUCTION
Research in new literacies: Conceptualizing the field
* Julie Coiro, University of Connecticut; Michele Knobel, Montclair State University;
Colin Lankshear, James Cook University; Donald J. Leu, Jr., University of Connecticut
II. METHODOLOGIES
Methodological issues in new literacies research
* Charles K. Kinzer, Teachers College, Columbia University, USA
Conducting research on multimodal texts using social semiotics
* Gunther Kress, University of London, England
The ethnographic investigation of online social practices
* Kevin Leander, Vanderbilt University, USA
Large-scale quantitative survey research on new technology uses
Ron Anderson, University of Minnesota, USA
Mixed methodology research on new literacies
Sonia Livingstone and Magdalena Bober, London School of Economics and Politics
Interviews and qualitative studies of online social practices
Lori Kendall, Purchase College-SUNY, USA
III. KNOWLEDGE AND INQUIRY
Comprehension and New Literacies for At-Risk Learners
* Bridget Dalton, Center for Applied Special Technology (CAST), USA
The Internet as an Information Resource
* Els Kuiper, Vrije Universiteit, Amsterdam, Netherlands
Handbook of Research on New Literacies, Oct04
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Hypertext and Navigation
* Kim Lawless, University of Illinois, Chicago, USA
Multimedia learning and literacy
* Richard Mayer, University of California, Santa Barbara, USA
Multimodel Reading and Comprehension in Online Environments
* Claire-Wyatt Smith and John Elkins, Griffith University, Queensland, Australia
Multiliteracies
*Len Unsworth, University of New England, Australia
IV. COMMUNICATION
Writing with new technologies in the early years
* Guy Merchant, Sheffield University, England
New technologies and second language learning
*Steven Thorne, Pennsylvania State University, USA
Weblogs as new literacies
*Torill Mortensen, Volda College, Norway
Internet Relay Chat: Studies of real-time conversations online
Susan Herring, Indiana University, Bloomington, USA
Instant Messaging
Gloria Jacobs, University of Rochester, USA
Effects and constructions of gender in online communications
Jon Marshall, University of Technology Sydney, Australia
V. POPULAR CULTURE
Popular culture in the classroom
* Rick Beach and David O’Brien, University of Minnesota, USA
New literacies, popular culture, and college students
* Dana Cammack, Teacher's College, Columbia University, USA
Literacy and Gaming
*Kurt Squire, University of Wisconsin-Madison, USA
Identity, popular culture and new literacies of adolescents
* Margaret Hagood, College of Charleston, South Carolina, USA
Handbook of Research on New Literacies, Oct04
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Narratives and popular culture from a media perspective
Margaret Mackey, University of Alberta, Canada
New technologies, literacy and popular culture in the everyday lives of young children
Jackie Marsh, Sheffield University, England
Digital technology, youth culture, communication and learning
Julian Sefton-Green, WAC Media Arts College, London
VI. CITIZENSHIP IN A GLOBALIZED WORLD
Cybercultures and Cyber Communities
* Angela Thomas, University of Sydney, Australia
Globalization, the Internet and citizenship
*Jerry Everard, Visiting Fellow, Australian National University, Australia
Literacy, technology and social inclusion
Mark Warschauer, University of California, Irvine, USA
New literacies and collaborative community projects
Chip Bruce, University of Illinois, Urbana-Champagne, USA
VII. INSTRUCTIONAL PRACTICES AND ASSESSMENT
Learning Management Systems and Virtual Learning Environments: A Higher Education Focus
* Neil Anderson and Colin Baskin, James Cook University, Australia
Researching multimodal literacy
*Carey Jewitt, Institute of Education, University of London, England
Writing with new technologies in the secondary English curriculum
* Ilana Snyder, Monash University, Victoria, Australia
Assessing learning in online contexts
Susan Goldman and Jim Pellegrino, University of Illinois, Chicago, USA
New literacies in math and science
Edys Quellmalz, Geneva Haertel, and Barbara Means, Center for Technology in Learning, SRI
International, Boston, USA
VIII. ANALYSIS AND CRITIQUE OF FIVE RESEARCH ARTICLES CENTRAL TO
THE FIELD
This section has two aims: (1) to survey key researchers in the area of new literacies and new
technologies and identify five research articles considered by most to be central texts in the
development of new literacies and new technologies as a distinct field of research endeavor; and
Handbook of Research on New Literacies, Oct04
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(2) to select ten key figures within this area to model for readers approaches to analyzing and
critiquing published research.
The design of this section comprises five reprinted articles and two analytic commentaries on
each of these articles. Each of the five areas of the handbook—i.e., Knowledge and Inquiry,
Communication, Popular Culture, Citizenship in a Globalized World, Instructional Practices and
Assessment—will be represented by one article. The editors will choose the articles based on
input from Handbook chapter authors. The articles will have been previously published in
journals. The commentators will be drawn from a pool of scholars widely recognized as having a
direct impact on research focusing on new technologies and new literacies. This pool from which
ten commentators will be drawn will include, but not be limited to, the following key figures:
James Gee (US), who has researched and published extensively in the area of learning, new literacies
and digital gaming
Jay Lemke (US), who is known internationally for his work on new digital media, literacy and learning.
Donna Alvermann (US), who has published widely on adolescent literacies and popular culture
Suzanne de Castell (Canada), who has researched widely in the areas of literacy, gender and gaming
Catherine Beavis (Australia), who has published widely in the area of subject English pedagogy and
digital technologies
Helen Nixon (Australia), who researches and publishes in the area of media, popular culture and the
new technologies of information and communication
Nola Alloway (Australia), who researches and publishes in the area of gender and new technologies
with a particular emphasis on early childhood settings
Wakio Oyanagi (Japan), who has worked with Nintendo in Japan as a consultant, and who is currently
Aide to the President of Nara University with respect to teacher education and new technologies.
Richard Andrews (England), who is known internationally for his work on information and
communication technologies and literacy education
John Furlong & Ruth Furlong (UK), who have studied home and school uses of computers and
impacted directed on policy in the UK concerning new technologies, teaching and learning
Neil Selwyn (UK), who is known widely for his research work on national technology programs and
critiques of instructional practices linked to, or promoted by, these programs
Sam Inkinen (Finland), who is well-known in northern Europe for his investigations of children and
their new media engagement
Tapio Varis (Finland), who has worked for UNESCO as a consultant on new technologies, literacies
and citizenship projects
Bill Cope & Mary Kalantzis (Australia), who are known internationally for their work in
multiliteracies and digital technologies
NOTES ON CONTRIBUTORS
AUTHOR INDEX
SUBJECT INDEX
Handbook of Research on New Literacies, Oct04
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EDITOR INFORMATION
Editor: Donald J. Leu, Jr.
Address: Neag School of Education
University of Connecticut
249 Glenbrook Road, U-2033
Storrs, CT 06269-2033
Ph: 860.486.0168
Fax: 860.486.2994
Email: donald.leu@uconn.edu
Donald J. Leu, Jr. holds the John and Maria Neag Endowed Chair in Literacy and Technology
at the University of Connecticut. His work focuses on the use of Internet technologies to support
literacy and learning. Don has more than 100 publications and seventeen books. His most recent
book is: Teaching with the Internet: New Literacies for New Times, 4th edition (2004) with
Deborah Diadiun Leu and Julie Coiro. A recent work, defining a new literacies perspective,
appears in the 5th edition of Theoretical Models and Processes of Reading. He has authored
chapters on new literacies in The Handbook of Reading Research and the Handbook of Literacy
and Technology. He edited the National Reading Conference Yearbook for six years and serves
on the editorial advisory boards of Reading Research Quarterly and Journal of Literacy
Research. Don is President-Elect of the National Reading Conference and is a Fellow in the
National Conference on Research in Language and Literacy.
Editor: Julie Coiro
Address: Neag School of Education
University of Connecticut
249 Glenbrook Road, U-2033
Storrs, CT 06269-2033
Ph: 860.486.0168
Fax: 860.486.2994
Email: jcoiro@snet.net
Julie Coiro is currently completing her dissertation on the nature of reading comprehension on
the Internet at the University of Connecticut in the department of Educational Psychology. Julie
also provides job-embedded professional development opportunities in the areas of technology
integration, curriculum development, and literacy skills and strategies and has been invited to
speak on these topics at universities and K-12 schools around the United States. She has
published articles on the changing nature of reading comprehension in The Reading Teacher and
New England Reading Association Journal. Julie recently co-authored the book Teaching with
the Internet: New Literacies for New Times, 4th edition (with Don and Deborah Diadiun Leu) and
has published chapters in the 5th edition of Theoretical Models and Processes of Reading, The
Handbook of Literacy and Technology, and in the upcoming book, Envisionments: Expanding
Literacies and Changing Technologies in Classroom Practices.
Handbook of Research on New Literacies, Oct04
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Editor: Michele Knobel
Address: Department of Early Childhood, Elementary and Literacy Education
210 Finley Hall
Montclair State University
Montclair, NJ 07009, USA
Ph: 973-655-5405
Fax: 973-655-7043
Email: knobelm@mail.montclair.edu
Michele Knobel is an Associate Professor at Montclair State University, New Jersey (USA),
where she is also the co-ordinator of the undergraduate and graduate literacy programs. Michele
is also an Adjunct Professor at Central Queensland University, Australia, and at McGill
University in Canada. She has worked within teacher education in Australia, Mexico, Canada
and the US. Her research interests focus principally on school students’ in-school and out-of-
school literacy practices, and the study of the relationship between new literacies and digital
technologies. She has published a number of books, including Everyday Literacies: Students,
Discourse and Social Practice. She has co-written a number of books in English and Spanish
with Colin Lankshear, including: New Literacies: Changing Knowledge and Classroom
Learning; Alfabetización en la Época de la Información: Perspectivas Contemporáneas; and the
recently published Handbook for Teacher Research.
Editor: Colin Lankshear
Address: School of Education
James Cook University
PO Box 6811
Cairns, Q. 4870
Australia
Email: colin@coatepec.net
Colin Lankshear is Research Professor at James Cook University in Queensland, Australia, where he
coordinates research in the School of Education on the Cairns Campus. He is also an associate teacher at
the National Autonomous University of Mexico in Mexico City, an Adjunct Professor on the Faculty of
Education and Creative Arts at Central Queensland University, and a Visiting Scholar at McGill
University in Montreal. His current research interests focus on literacy and new technologies, and he
retains a long time interest in critical theory. Some of his books include Literacy, Schooling and
Revolution, The New Work Order (with James Gee and Glynda Hull), Changing Literacies, Teachers
and Technoliteracy (with Ilana Snyder), and two books in Spanish on qualitative research, Maneras de
Ver and Maneras de Descubrir (with Michele Knobel).
Handbook of Research on New Literacies, Oct04
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REFEREES
Charles Kinzer
Department of Mathematics, Science and Technology
Teachers College, Columbia University
525 West 120th Street
New York
NY 10027
Tel: 212-678 3341
kinzer@exchange.tc.columbia.edu
Donna Alvermann
School of Leadership and Lifelong Learning
University of Georgia, Athens
309 Aderhold Hall
Athens, GA 30602-7125
Tel: 706-542-2718
dalverma@uga.edu
Joanne Larson
Chair, Teaching, Curriculum, and Change
Warner Graduate School of Education and Human Development
University of Rochester RC Box 270425
Rochester, NY 14627 USA
JLarson@ITS.Rochester.edu
Rick Beach
Department of Curriculum and Instruction
College of Education and Human Development
University of Minnesota
125 Peik Hall
159 Pillsbury Drive SE
Minneapolis, MN 55455-0208
Tel: 612-625 4006
rbeach@unm.edu
Catherine Kell
Learning Designer
Centre for Flexible and Distance Learning (CFDL)
University of Auckland
4th Floor, Fisher Building
Waterloo Quadrant
NEW ZEALAND
Tel: 64- 9-3737599x84883
Fax: 64-9-3737940x83840
c.kell@auckland.ac.nz
... For some within the research community, there is now sufficient evidence to argue for a model of digital literacy that distinguishes this form of processing from what has been articulated for print (Lankshear & Knobel, 2007). Those holding to this position contend that the unique features populating online sites alter the very act of reading (Coiro, Knobel, Lankshear, & Leu, 2014). Whether this argument for a new digital literacy is warranted or not, it appears to be predicated largely on the extra-textual elements conveyed by the medium and does not address the medium per se as an influential force. ...
... However, with a recognition of those increased demands and with an appreciation of the rapidly changing nature of technology (Falloon, 2013;Prensky, 2001), we would contend that it is overly simplistic to treat reading on computer as if it were a unidimensional phenomenon. Rather, it would appear that reading digitally can run the gamut from encounters with texts that have simply been transferred from page to computer with no adornments to engagements with those texts that are highly embellished with all the features and tools technology can afford (Coiro, , Knobel, , Lankshear, , & Leu, 2014). Thus, those seeking to articulate models or theories of reading digitally cannot overlook this immense diversity in their assessments, their conceptualizations of "digital literacy," or their claims regarding the uniqueness of reading online. ...
Article
Real-time processing behaviors and processing time for 57 undergraduates reading information texts in print and digitally were used to identify distinct performance profiles. Students underlined the printed text as they read and followed along with their cursor when reading digitally. Immediately after reading, students answered three comprehension questions for each text about the main idea, key points, and other information and judged their performance on the comprehension test. Four profiles were identified using deeper and more surface-level processing behaviors and reading time for both mediums (i.e. Regulators, Plodders, Gliders, and Samplers) and comprehension and calibration (i.e., self-assessment accuracy) data were analyzed by medium and profile. An overall medium effect for comprehension, along with various profile differences were identified. No overall calibration difference by medium was found, although various effects by profile were identified. Implications of outcomes for future research on reading in print and digitally are forwarded.
... Research on digital literacy is well documented (e.g., Coiro, et al., 2008). Recent developments have provided us with information about some digital literacy roles in literacy education. ...
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