Article

Investigation of Green Consumer Profile: A Case of Lithuanian Market of Eco-Friendly Food Products

Authors:
To read the full-text of this research, you can request a copy directly from the authors.

Abstract

Nowadays, sustainable development, i.e. a compromise between environmental, economical, and social objectives of society, is inevitably essential in order to reach the well-being of present and future generations. In this context the change in consumption tendency has been observed recently. It is characterized by the increase in consumers' environmental awareness, increased interest in eco-friendly, safe and "clean" products that do not pollute the environment. In terms of marketing, such changes determine the need to know the new, so called green, consumer and to adapt marketing solutions with the focus on ascertaining the expectations and satisfying the needs of such a consumer. Thus, this article presents the interpretation of the conception of a green consumer based on the investigations of both foreign and Lithuanian scientific works. When describing a green consumer, its profile is generalized in the article. It encompasses both demographic and psychographic-behavioural characteristics of a consumer. The article introduces the findings of empirical research into the demographic and psychographic-behavioural profiles of female consumers of eco-friendly food products in Lithuania.

No full-text available

Request Full-text Paper PDF

To read the full-text of this research,
you can request a copy directly from the authors.

... One of the demographic variable examined extensively in relation with consumer green purchase decisions is age. The studies have suggested that as the age of consumers increases, they become greener (Samdahl & Robertson, 1989;D' Souza et al., 2007;Banyte et al., 2010;Paco et al., 2010;Awad, 2011;Akter, 2012). For example, D' Souza et al. (2007) observed that older consumers are more critical to the environmental hazards which may cause due to the use of a product. ...
... Supporting D' Souza et al. (2007), Xiao and Dunlap (2007) also indicated that older consumers are more willing to engage in recycling behaviour. More specifically, Paco et al. (2010) and Banyte et al. (2010) revealed that consumers in the age bracket of 25 to 54 years are more positive towards eco-friendly products. Recently, Zhao et al., (2014) also opined that older consumers are expected to engage in pro-environmental behaviour. ...
... With reference to gender, previous researchers have indicated the significant differences among the consumers of different genders for their green preferences (Laroche et al., 2001;Banyte et al., 2010;Erdogan et al., 2012). The researchers such as Lee (2008) and Erdogen et al. (2012) suggested that the female consumers are more concerned about the environment and hence, behave more responsibly towards the environment. ...
Chapter
Full-text available
The issue of convergence in the literature of growth is mainly in terms of GDP. GDP is considered as a metric of measurement of economic performance and standard of living and is highly significant for cross-country comparisons. But it does not include economic costs of pollution damages and natural resource depletion and thus it does not adequately include the human and social welfare. In this chapter, we adjust GDP with the economic costs of pollution damages and natural resource depletion and construct Green GDP and test the conditional and unconditional β and σ convergence of South Asian countries in terms of per capita Green GDP for over a period of 1990-2016. The conditioning variables that proxy for the steady-state of the economies are population, economic openness, the age dependency ratio, average years of total schooling and total emissions. We also evaluate the relative position of each South Asian country in terms of per capita Green GDP and also try to find out the factors that would affect the initial per capita Green GDP and its growth rate. In this chapter, we also use a fixed effect panel regression to evaluate conditional β convergence in per capita Green GDP. We find evidence of unconditional σ divergence and cannot draw any significant conclusion about the conditional σ convergence. We also find no significant result in case of absolute β convergence in per capita Green GDP. The regression of our analysis shows evidence of conditional β convergence. However, our panel regression shows evidence of conditional β divergence which suggest that when countries are interdependent in their policymaking that would affect the growth rate of per capita Green GDP then no poor country would be able to catch up with rich counterparts.
... People who received higher education are more prone to buy green products than those with a lower level of education [77][78][79]. Lithuanian research proved that welleducated consumers are able to discern environmental issues and are more sensitive to them [80]. Also Sidique et al. [81] claimed that there is a positive relationship between education and green behavior. ...
... Purchasers' environmental awareness is growing, which is the reason why consumers representing the medium-income group express their intention to purchase green products [90]. Research conducted by Banyte et al. [80], which covered mediumincome women, demonstrated positive intentions of buying green products. We established the following hypotheses: Hypothesis 4a (H4a). ...
... Relatively young women who have children and whose personal circumstances are good can be considered to be the most promising consumers. Contrary to the other groups, they were more engaged in behaviors towards purchasing environment-friendly products, which is concurrent with the Lithuanian research that identified the green consumer as an affluent and well-educated woman aged between 30 and 44 [80]. As shown by the research, femininity is closely correlated with environmental protection [102]. ...
Article
Full-text available
Environmental degradation is a serious problem in modern civilization as it causes changes in consumer behavior towards ecologically responsible purchasing. In order to understand the green product purchasing decision process, an extensive literature review on green purchasing behavior was conducted. The current study is an exploratory research and the purpose of this paper was to investigate how sociodemographic factors explain consumers’ green purchase behavior. The differences between gender, age, education level, personal financial situation, and the number of children in the family were examined. To achieve the goal, we conducted a survey among 650 Polish consumers. Our findings suggest that all of the above-mentioned sociodemographic variables have an impact on awareness and purchasing behavior towards green products. Moreover, the results show that female consumers have more positive attitudes towards purchasing green products, than male consumers. Young consumers are skeptical about green products. A positive relationship was established between education and the acknowledgement of the dominance of one’s own needs over the needs of the environment. The better the personal financial situation, the more people expressed their intention to buy green products. The paper shows the implications for marketing. In addition, our exploratory research shows future research directions based on findings from the point of view of green consumer behavior. The study is an in-depth analysis of the factors determining green purchasing behavior. It contributes to the current literature by strengthening the existing knowledge about the factors influencing green purchase behavior in developing countries.
... Although there is no unique definition of green consumers, most of the research identifies them as consumers whose consumption is significantly affected by their environmental and social concerns [17,18]. These consumers believe that their actions have a significant impact on the environment and they contribute to its preservation through purchasing green products [19]. ...
... Additionally, a segmentation analysis revealed that green consumers' purchase and their willingness to pay premium prices for green products are influenced by the social altruism and the level of their concerns on environmental pollution, as well as by the level of their personal responsibility to contribute to environmental preservation and fostering green initiatives. However, segmentation analysis failed to give more precise insight into the main factors that shape their buying behavior [17,19]. ...
... In order to identify the main drivers of green consumers' purchases in general, including the purchases in the organic food market, further research has been conducted. The research of Banytė et al. [17] as well as a study by Smith and Paladino [25] revealed that all green consumers are concerned with the solution of environmental issues. Therefore, environmental knowledge and concern for the future are very important factors that lead to forming positive attitudes toward green and organic food [18,26]. ...
Article
Full-text available
The aim of this paper was to analyze the main factors that affect green consumers’ choice regarding the purchase of organic agriculture products. The data collected through a survey of 559 green consumers were analyzed using explanatory factor analysis, the Relative Importance Index, and logistic regression. The results point out eleven main factors related to the offerings on the organic agriculture market that predominantly drive green consumers’ purchasing decisions. The Relative Importance Index identified health benefits that stem from a specific way of production as the main purchasing motive. This was also confirmed by the results of logistic regression, which showed that a respondent who buys organic agricultural products on a daily basis is approximately 71.5% less likely to disagree with the claim that organic products are healthier than non-organic, compared to a consumer who purchases organic products several times a week or month. However, as these benefits cannot be empirically confirmed, green consumers look for official labels on the product packaging. In order to assure the product quality, more than half of them find out very important information about producers: whether they have a product quality certificate (69.5%), how many years they are engaged in production (56.2%), and whether they have specific product packaging (54.9%). The Relative Importance Index also revealed that the main purchasing barriers that consumers face are scarce offerings and an insufficient development of the distribution channel, which were ranked in first and second place. The price as a barrier is of less importance. About 30.8% of the respondents are willing to pay up to 20% higher prices for organic food compared to conventional food, while 39.4% of them would pay even up to 40% higher prices. Based on the given results, there are clear suggestions for creating a sustainable marketing strategy for organic agriculture products as the main prerequisite for an increase of healthy food choices and fostering the future development of organic agriculture businesses at the local and global levels.
... Modifications in the elements as per Association of Health Care Providers (India) made for easy understanding of respondents. Questions asked in the dimension pertaining to Facilities of the Hospitals with respect to the Green Marketing. (Banyte et. al, 2010). But as per our study it was found that respondent with only age group 36-40 years are having identical thoughts with the conclusion made by Banyte et. al (2010). Respondents who are either housewives or students having Zero income have identical perception toward facilities provided by the hospitals in Chhattisgarh according to APHI St ...
... Health Care Providers (India) made for easy understanding of respondents. Questions asked in the dimension pertaining to Facilities of the Hospitals with respect to the Green Marketing. (Banyte et. al, 2010). But as per our study it was found that respondent with only age group 36-40 years are having identical thoughts with the conclusion made by Banyte et. al (2010). Respondents who are either housewives or students having Zero income have identical perception toward facilities provided by the hospitals in Chhattisgarh according to APHI Standards as far their counterparts having earning of Rs 20,001-Rs 25,000 (p=.038) Respondents with income more than Rs 15,000 are agree with the respondents under ...
Article
Green Practices in manufacturing industry are common in many countries but question arises with such practices have become the part of service industry. This paper is an attempt to study the green marketing practices in hospitals located in Chhattisgarh state as per the standards of Association of Health Care Providers India. With total 25 hospitals which include 15 public and 10 private hospitals was selected located in different district of the state. Target audience was the patients who either been hospitalized or the attainders who were with their relatives in the hospitals. Sample size of the study was 306 spread out in different locations and availed the services of any hospitals having more than 100 beds within the state. A structured questionnaire with 5 point liker scale was given to the sample to rate their preference. It was revealed by the study that both public and private hospitals were practicing standards of Association of Health Care Providers India with slight more positive inclination of patients and/or attainders toward private hospital.
... Current research (Akehurst et al., 2012;Tung et al., 2012;Paço et al., 2009) demonstrate more and more clearly that the green consumer is slightly older. Lithuanian research prove that well-educated consumers can discern environmental issues and are more sensitive to them (Banytė, 2010). Many types of research showed that green product purchasing is positively correlated with purchasers' income (Loureiro and Lotade, 2005;Al-Otoum and Nimri, 2015). ...
... Relatively young women who have children and whose personal circumstances are good can be considered the most promising consumers. Contrary to the other groups, they are more engaged in purchasing environment-friendly products, concurrent with the Lithuanian research that identifies the green consumer as an affluent and well-educated woman aged between 30 and 44 (Banytė, 2010). As shown by the researches, femininity is closely correlated with environmental protection (Dočekalová and Straková, 2011). ...
... Through the proposed classification, we aim to identify the key attributes that a user should have so as to be privacy aware and therefore, to compose these attributes into a proposed "profile of an information privacy aware user". Sketching the profile of an individual exerting a set of specific behaviors is a technique that has been used in other contexts, such as propotion of certain consumer practices (Banytė et al., 2010) or discouragement of addictions in alcohol or drugs (Dacosta et al., 2020). Following this approach, we envision to inform Internet users about how to raise their IPA and to motivate them to be more active regarding their privacy protection, through proposing the relevant profile. ...
... In particular, literature indicates that composition of profiles is a quite known technique, which researchers use so as to promote desired behaviors or discourage undesired ones. Banytė et al. (2010) introduce the profile of the green consumer and identify his main characteristics in order to help marketers to choose effective solutions of green marketing and keep up with consumers who constantly prefer to buy eco-friendly products. Higuchi and Maehara (2021) identify the need to understand consumers' psychological preferences for quinoa and, as a result, introduce the profile of quinoa consumers with a view to help marketers and policymakers to successfully respond to the growing quinoa food market demands. ...
Article
In today’s Internet reliant services, the issue of users’ information privacy awareness is being raised. Despite the fact that in many cases internet users claim to be cognizant of privacy issues, they tend to jeopardize their privacy and take no actions to protection it. This paper reports a systematic literature review of existing studies related to Internet users’ information privacy awareness, towards enhancing respective initiatives and defining the attributes that a user should have so as to be privacy aware. We created a five-concept classification framework for the research topics that the academic community raises as important to be further investigated and the main challenges inhibiting information privacy awareness, and we classified all the selected papers according to this framework. Based on the analysis of the literature, we identify five main attributes that constitute a “Profile for the Information Privacy Aware User”, stemming from the classification framework, and further, we suggest the way this profile can be beneficial for internet users, Internet providers and designers of privacy awareness enhancing technologies. Additionally, we highlight research gaps and we provide useful insights for future research, such as the need for a concrete definition (theme 1), the need for the proposal of privacy preventive technologies (theme 3 and 4) and the need for investigation of information privacy awareness in multiple contexts (theme 5).
... Lifestyle, personality and values are most often used to outline the psychological profile of the green consumer. Often, the psychographic profile is analyzed separately from the behavioral profile (Straughan and Roberts, 1999;do Paço and Raposo, 2009;Banytė et al., 2010), although they are very similar. The particularities of the consumer's behavior are closely related to their psychological characteristics, which has an impact on their purchase reasons and other variables (Banytė et al., 2010). ...
... Often, the psychographic profile is analyzed separately from the behavioral profile (Straughan and Roberts, 1999;do Paço and Raposo, 2009;Banytė et al., 2010), although they are very similar. The particularities of the consumer's behavior are closely related to their psychological characteristics, which has an impact on their purchase reasons and other variables (Banytė et al., 2010). Frequently, the attitudes, knowledge, reasons for buying/not buying, benefits, brand loyalty, etc. are analyzed (do Paço and Raposo, 2009). ...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
This paper reports on the latest contributions of research on organic food consumers in Romania. In order to summarize and systematize the information gained in the last years, it was advisable to make a short literature review on this topic. Subsequently, using only the contributions that investigate the Romanian market, an analysis was performed to synthesize the observed results. Based on the information collected, the consumer profile was defined according to the demographic, socioeconomic, psychographic and behavioral characteristics. In this regard, it was noted that the specialists' concern was especially to research the demographic and behavioral characteristics. Following this analysis, the Romanian consumer is between the ages of 35-45, is a woman rather than a man, with an above-average income and with higher education. He has an active life, he tries to strike a balance between family and professional life, and he takes care of his health. In general, he buys basic products, wholemeal or less processed, usually from hypermarkets/supermarkets and specialized stores. The article ends with highlighting the gaps noted in the research up to this moment and with proposals for future research on this topic
... Conflicting results have also emerged from green consumer profiling [23,24]. Some authors investigated country-specific demographic variables, as in the case of Jain and Kaur [25] in India and Banyte et al. [26] in Lithuania. Albayrak et al. [27], in agreement with Sandahl and Robertson [28], highlighted that demographic variables are not the most reliable and are not the only determinants of environmental concern and ecological behaviour. ...
... Unfortunately, the literature has not shown any consensus on ecologically friendly consumers or on the variables that could predict green behaviour [26,60]. Indeed, Roberts [61] even argues for a schizophrenic profile. ...
Article
Full-text available
Although many authors agree on the role of personal values in explaining the main determinants of eco-behaviour, disagreement about the effects of socio-demographic features exists, particularly about the effect of nationality. In an attempt to fill this gap in the literature, this paper contributes to the debate surrounding the main determinants of eco-behaviour, based on a cross-country analysis. To test the role of nationality and personal values in eco-behaviour, a linear regression model involving 353 Chinese and 333 Italian subjects was performed. A stepwise analysis was then conducted to identify the main significant effects. The explorative and stepwise analyses confirmed that nationality is significant when explaining individual eco-behaviour, for both Italian and Chinese people. Moreover, the linear regression model, as a stepwise analysis, showed that regulatory focus and universalism are the main personal values influencing ecological behaviour. Differences emerging from the analysis show significant differences in terms of eco-behaviour and eco-awareness, for the two countries involved in the analysis, that might lead companies to adopt different marketing strategies when promoting eco-products.
... Green brand positioning is the green image as perceived by the market or the customer. It is emphasized that a green posture or a green image includes a mental picture or description for customers to characterize the organization (Banytė, Brazionienė, & Gadeikienė, 2010). Therefore, green brand positioning in this study is concerned with how a green brand company created a green image to portray itself to the market and customers. ...
Article
Full-text available
This study examined the relationship between brand positioning, attitude and knowledge, and green brand purchase intention among Thai consumers. Closed-ended questionnaires (Likert's Rating Scale) were used to collect data through the online survey and convenience sampling from a valid 335 sets of responses. The demographic characteristics were analysed using SPSS Version 27. The hypotheses were analysed by adopting the Partial Least Square Structural Equation Model (PLS-SEM). The findings confirmed the significant relationship between brand positioning and green product purchase intention through the mediating role of attitude and knowledge. This study may help business owners and green product marketers improve their marketing management by responding to the needs of green product consumers. Therefore, green product sellers should focus on green brand positioning, customers' attitude, and knowledge about green products. Moreover, the results could be incorporated into green product marketplace strategies to enhance purchase intention via brand positioning, customers' attitude, and knowledge about green products. The additional qualitative study, such as interviews and focus groups should be explored insight into factors such as digital marketing, customer relationship marketing (CRM), and brand image for further study.
... to Michel & Jasmin [14], the other main factors generally include retailor patronage; personal experience from the use of the given products; motivation for the purchase; personal attitude of the consumers as well as the personality of the lifestyle of the consumers [15]. ...
Article
Full-text available
Present Research focuses mainly on the understanding awareness of consumers' towards Eco-friendly FMCG products. FMCG products could be anything i.e. household or a personal care product. Objective of the study is to access the consumers' awareness for environmental friendly products and its marketing. Consumers of Gujarat mainly from the three prominent cities namely Ahmadabad, Surat and Vadodara are taken into account.The result that came after analyzing the data collected through structured questionnaire show that the awareness of the consumers is high.
... Production that does not harm the environment, also known as sustainable production, refers to fulfilling producers' economic goals while respecting the ecological needs of the environment. Such a type of production, which is a subject of much research and policymaking, is inevitable for the further development of production and prosperity of future generations [41]. The development of sustainable production policies has motivated a growing number of producers to change and adjust their mode of production to reduce their production's negative effects on the environment [42]. ...
Article
Full-text available
One can observe the sustainability of traditional food products (TFPs) consumption in terms of their market, production, and technical characteristics. These characteristics must be acknowledged by the management section of a catering facility responsible for purchasing and consuming these products. Consequently, this research was conducted among the management of catering facilities (chefs, managers, and owners) in Vojvodina (northern region of Serbia) from 300 different facilities. The research was conducted using a questionnaire. The data acquired were statistically processed using the non-parametric Mann–Whitney and Kruskal–Wallis tests and presented in this paper. Special attention was given to differences in perceiving the characteristics of TFP of Vojvodina (TASQ) as seen from the socio-demographic aspects of the respondents and the characteristics of catering facilities. The research deduced that the sensory quality of a product, menu diversity, freshness, local production, price, and seasonality are the prominent characteristics that affect the TFP’s choice of purchase and consumption. The least essential characteristics are organic production and brand. The differences in perception of the characteristics were based on the respondent’s age, education level, and working position, as well as catering offer (domestic, national, international, and combined) and the location of a catering facility (urban/rural).
... The current factor related to the environment involves variables that represent the foundation for consumers' awareness and proper action toward acting in an eco-friendly way. Various studies have found as main problems of concern: the depletion of natural resources, global warming, pollution, health threats of toxic substances, greenhouse effect reduction and many other problems [124,138]. These problems are the ones that are taken into consideration by the consumers at the moment of acquiring a green product as proof of "loyalty towards green commitment" [10]. ...
Article
Full-text available
This paper attempts to empirically investigate the main variables that might exert a significant influence over the green purchase decisions of a Romanian consumer. An online survey was conducted on a sample of 915 individuals. The objectives of the study aim to evaluate the influence of different types of variables (related to the person, the environment, the product and the reference group) on the decision to purchase green products. For data analysis, both descriptive statistics measurements and a logit regression model were used. One of the most important findings shows that there is a significant and positive relationship between environmental factors (e.g., pollution reduction, greenhouse effect reduction) and the decision to purchase organic products; furthermore , Romanian consumers are less willing to pay high prices for green products. By offering important information on new variables relevant for a deeper understanding of a consumer located in a green emerging market such as Romania, this study may be useful for both academics and companies that could be interested in entering new local markets.
... Purchasing is a complex process and is associated with many factors behind. Moreover, green consumers are sophisticated buyers, and marketers have to be aware of their preferences and the influential factors of their decisions while designing a green product [36]. Basiri and Heydari [37] analyse green products from both perspectives, from the decision making process and the level of green sales. ...
Article
Full-text available
Diminishing resources, climate change, and environmental challenges emphasize the need for sustainable development. The circular economy is considered a concept that faces and contributes to overcoming such challenges. This research aims to identify circular pathway influential factors in Albania by exploring green product consumption patterns. Primary quantitative research was carried out in an online survey in Albania. Exploratory factor analysis and multiple logistic regression are performed. The main influential factor on green products purchase behaviour that can serve as an influential factor to shift into the circular economy in Albania is product labelling. This evokes and supports environmental sensitivity that contributes to favouring green products. Further supportive factors are product recycling, instruction manual, and details about the ingredients, while hindering factors are the absence of interest and time pressure. However, consumption of green products depends on education level: graduates and postgraduates should have been targeted to attract novel target groups. © 2021, Budapest Tech Polytechnical Institution. All rights reserved.
... Green awareness is a crucial element to the sustainable consumption behavior of consumers. Consumers are aware of green issues, such as depleting natural resources, global warming, and pollution, and consider them when making green product purchase decisions (Banytė et al., 2010;Schlegelmilch et al., 1996;Young et al., 2010). In addition, it has been found that behavioral intention plays the most crucial role in explaining behavior . ...
Article
Full-text available
Many studies explored consumer motivation toward purchasing behavior of environmentally friendly products. However, although consumers are aware of products' possible environmental and social impacts, there is no transparent approach to obtain such information and facilitate their green purchasing accordingly. Therefore, based on the developed novel scale of sustainability-related information of the product as a moderating factor, this research aims to study the facilitating mechanism of such information in influencing consumers' purchasing behavior with a premium price. An online survey of 713 consumers was conducted in the context of purchasing new energy vehicles. Using SPSS 25, the social impact information could significantly affect the premium price the consumers would pay compared to environmental impact information. Furthermore, marital status, income level, and age significantly affect the purchasing behavior of potential consumers. This study provides theoretical and methodological support for enterprises to develop product sustainability indicators and guide them in designing business activities.
... People with higher education are more likely to buy green products than those with lower education [6]. Well-educated consumers can identify environmental problems and are more sensitive to sustainable goods [7]. However, education is an individual level factor. ...
Article
Full-text available
As the world grapples with the ever-worsening specter of climate change, it becomes important for various nations/governments to develop mitigating measures. One of the ways to ebb the march of climate decline is to educate the population in respective countries about sustainable consumption that reduces carbon emissions. While prior research has explored the key factors of sustainable consumption in several industries, such as consumer knowledge and personal norm, it has played relatively little attention to them macro-level variables such as level of post-materialism and innovation. To this end, we study the interplay between individual-level factors and national-level variables using a hierarchical linear model on consumers’ perceived value for sustainable products and subsequent sustainable behavior. We used a dataset from the World Value Survey, which includes over 34 thousand respondents covering 40 different nations. The finding suggests that differences in individual-level sustainable consumption are explained by national-level factors. Post-materialist societies were willing to make financial sacrifices for sustainable consumption. Our findings also emphasize that the national-level factor Green Innovation modifies the relationship between Preserved Value and Sustainable Consumption at the individual-level. The findings not only sharpen our sustainability knowledge from a hierarchical view, but also provide useful guidelines for policymakers to promote sustainable consumption. Our study emphasizes that sustainable behavior is the consequence of the interplay between multilevel factors.
... Enfin, le croisement de trois différentes typologies de consommateurs à savoir : la « jauge verte » (GFK Roper Consulting, 2008); le « monde de la responsabilité » (Wortington, 2009); et les « profils de consommateurs verts » (Banyte et al., 2010), donne quatre segments de consommateurs dont trois engagés d'une manière ou d'une autre à la responsabilité (Ertz, 2021, pp. 169-170 Pour finir, nous avons les « pas du tout impliqués ». ...
Thesis
Full-text available
Purchasing and consumption habits have been considerably disrupted by the Covid-19 crisis. In some areas, a significant drop in consumption has been observed, due to the sanitary measures taken to control the pandemic. This "deconsumption" is therefore forced and not voluntary. It results, in fact, from the different sanitary measures put in place by the government to fight against the pandemic (e.g. confinement, closure of non-essential businesses, social distancing, curfew). This state of affairs led to strong emotional reactions among consumers. Some of the emotions felt by consumers include: anger, disappointment, regret, and fear. Since then, although marketing studies have looked at the disruption of purchasing and consumption habits during this period of crisis, few studies have looked at the emotional management behaviors and adaptation of consumers to the forced deconsumption caused by the pandemic. With this in mind, we decided to test, on a sample of 273 respondents, the emotional management and coping strategies of North American consumers in the face of the forced deconsumption induced by the pandemic. We found that, when faced with forced deconsumption in a crisis context, Angry consumers used confrontation, social support and, to a small extent, mental disengagement because the emotion of anger is intense. Disappointed consumers used mental disengagement because the emotion of disappointment is not intense. Regretful consumers dealt with it by using confrontation strategies, for those whose level of emotion was strong; and acceptance, behavioral disengagement, and positive reinterpretation strategies for those with moderate levels of emotion. Consumers who experienced fear used self-control, planned resolution, behavioural disengagement, and mental disengagement (to a small extent) for some; and social support seeking for others whose feelings of fear were intense. The results obtained could be useful to researchers, business managers, marketing practitioners, policy makers and other government actors.
... For example, Apple pays special attention in the selection of different developers of green solutions such as Too Good to go, Ecosia, and Recycle Coach. Secondly, the sponsor must indicate, to digital algorithms, the imperative to search for green users (demand-side), i.e., customers who consistently buy environmentally friendly products and are actively interested in environmental problems and their solutions (Banytė et al. 2010). Finally, the platform sponsor must indicate how to connect the two market sides to the digital algorithms. ...
Article
Full-text available
This work aims to develop a conceptual model to support countries, institutions, and firms toward the accomplishment of present Agenda 2030 sustainability goals. The last two decades have seen a growing interest in sustainability. Climate change, resource scarcity, multipolarity of interests, mistrust and delegitimization of institutions are just some of the critical issues that need to be addressed. There is broad consensus on the urgency of generating further social, environmental, and economic innovation to address these challenges, reshaping global markets, and offering new spaces of action to firms and institutions. Accordingly, there also is a wide search for new models of organizing firms. Digital platforms are among those. Moreover, since digital platforms require coordination among multiple actors and interests in order to succeed, they may also be conceptualized as meta-organizations, less hierarchical than firms yet more tightly coupled than markets. However, despite the wide literature on platforms, this organizational lens seems not to have been taken into the right consideration. This conceptual work aims to fill this gap, providing a framework that clarifies why and how a digital platform ecosystem could configure a sustainable meta-organizational model, and also providing the main steps to build it.
... Further, Rahimah et al. (2020) investigated the role of self-esteem, mortality salience, materialism, religiosity in sustainability attitude. Customers are conscious of environmental issues (e.g., exhaustion of natural resources, animal protection, health vulnerability) and consider these factors while shopping (Banyte et al., 2010). Therefore, researchers attempt to encourage sustainability in different sectors. ...
The role of social media in promoting sustainable attitudes is currently understudied. Underpinned by social learning theory, this study unveils the effect of social media usage and browsing on sustainable purchasing attitude, the underlying mechanism, and the boundary condition. Drawing on a sample of 693 experienced respondents analyzed using structural equation modeling, this study reveals that social media usage and browsing have a significant positive association. Both constructs significantly impact sustainable purchasing attitudes with complementary partial mediation of the drive for environmental responsibility. Further, trust in social media and perceived environmental effectiveness significantly moderate the relationships belongs to the browsing and drive for environmental responsibility. Contrary to the theorization, moderating constructs cannot substantially impact the proposed associations of social media usage. In this manner, the present research is innovative and provides valued knowledge to comprehend social media's role in encouraging sustainable attitudes.
... Banytė., et al. [9] articulated that only 40 per cent respondents (n = 105) were credited to be less devoted green consumers based on their nature to contribute to environmental conservation. The respondents expressed that they were concerned about the environmental issues but were busy to change their lifestyle considerably. ...
... Moreover, other studies have also suggested that femininity and "greenness" have come to be cognitively linked (by men and women), and this is largely evidence by many green marketing efforts targeting areas in which "women tend to be more involved than men, such as cleaning, food preparation, family health, laundry, and domestic maintenance" (Brough et al., 2016, p. 568), with most eco-friendly products being marketed to women. Past findings have also revealed that female buyers are likely to respond favorably to eco-labels, green claims and environmental branding, in particular toward cosmetics and beauty care products (Thøgersen et al., 2010;Banytė et al., 2010) In addition, several studies have indicated factors such as "animal welfare," "environmental concern," "health" and "safety" are major factors motivating female shoppers to purchase green cosmetics and beauty care products (Singhal & Malik, 2018;Pudaruth et al., 2015;Tsakiridou et al., 2008;Cervellon et al., 2010). Organic beauty products are perceived as possessing higher quality, being good for health and safer due to the avoided risk of pesticide residues often found in cosmetics and beauty products (Pudaruth et al., 2015). ...
Article
Full-text available
This paper investigates female shoppers’ attitude and purchase intention towards green cosmetics. Underpinned with an extended theory of planned behaviour model, the research framework examines consumers’ attitude and purchase intention. In addition, the moderating influence of consumer involvement is tested. Data (n = 408) were collected from South Africa and analysed through structural equation modelling. The results show that subjective norm has a significant positive impact on the consumers’ purchase intention for green cosmetics. Also, ecological motive and environmental knowledge impact the consumers’ attitude towards green cosmetics. In addition, consumers’ involvement strengthens the positive relationship between attitude and purchase intention. However, the role of perceived behavioural control and health consciousness were non-significant. The findings suggest that practitioners should try to enhance the consumers’ knowledge and involvement about green cosmetics. They should inform and educate the consumers through an integrated marketing communication approach by means of campaigns, advertisements, and public relations. Thus, through relevant environmental information or knowledge, consumers will be more educated aiming to impact positive attitude and purchase intention.
... The main factor that influences consumer behaviour is considered to be education (Pop et al., 2015). Many studies prove that people with a higher level of education have a greater perception and awareness of environmental issues (Apaydin & Szczepaniak, 2017;Banyte et al., 2010;D'Souza et al., 2006;Yuan & Zuo, 2013). Apaydin and Szczepaniak (2017) suggest that consumers with a higher level of education and higher incomes are more concerned about environmental protection. ...
Chapter
This book seeks to provide interdisciplinary (nay, rather multidisciplinary) perspectives on poverty and development. The Cambridge Dictionary defines the word ‘poverty’ in simple terms as the condition of a person being poor. Classically, two major traditions for defining poverty are notable: relative and absolute. Relative poverty is defined as the state of having inadequate resources to maintain an acceptable way of living (Townsend, 1979); absolute poverty is a condition characterised by severe deprivation of basic human needs. The multidimensional definition of poverty was adopted in Copenhagen in 1995. It denotes a state in which poor people experience various conditions in their daily lives, such as poor health, lack of education, inadequate housing, limited access to clean water and healthy food, disempowerment, poor quality of work, the threat of violence and living in areas that are environmentally hazardous, among others. Thus, poverty can exist in social, economic and political terms (see Pogge, 2010; Sachs, 2015).
... The main factor that influences consumer behaviour is considered to be education (Pop et al., 2015). Many studies prove that people with a higher level of education have a greater perception and awareness of environmental issues (Apaydin & Szczepaniak, 2017;Banyte et al., 2010;D'Souza et al., 2006;Yuan & Zuo, 2013). Apaydin and Szczepaniak (2017) suggest that consumers with a higher level of education and higher incomes are more concerned about environmental protection. ...
Book
Full-text available
This book brings together interdisciplinary perspectives with the aim of broadening understandings of poverty. It contains both empirical and conceptual chapters, including those by local researchers, on a range of topics highlighting the relationship between poverty and sustainability. It cover themes such as: changes in the environment that pose an existential risk to humans; new concepts in tourism development that consider it as one of the key contributors in the prosperity and well-being of all stakeholders; natural, social and economic aspects of human behaviour and environmental sustainability; the impact of global warming on human well-being; immigration and integration policies and analyses of public discourse on migrants; and overconsumption and its impact on sustainable development. It will be a helpful resource for students and researchers of environmental management, tourism, global justice and sustainable development. Coming soon
... Applications related to agricultural products are less common in the literature [53]. Recently, however, the contingent valuation method has been more frequently used to measure consumer preferences for new products [54] and to determine the factors influencing the WTP for food products [50,55]. A discrepancy between hypothetical and actual payments, i.e., the hypothetical bias, is possible in WTP. ...
Article
Full-text available
Ecosystem-based agricultural practices that utilize ecosystem processes aim to either reduce the negative externalities of agricultural production or increase the production of ecosystem services other than food provision. We examined consumer interest in buying and paying for food produced using ecosystem-based agricultural practices. According to the results, the most preferred practices were the more efficient use of livestock manure, the use of nitrogen-fixing crops, biological pest control, and the addition of soil carbon. Having these practices as an attribute of a food product increased the interest in buying the product for 43% of consumers. Their median willingness to pay (WTP) was 20% higher than for conventional products. Using socioeconomic and attitudinal variables, a hurdle model revealed the characteristics of a consumer segment interested in ecosystem-based agricultural practices.
... Il green user o consumatore verde è un consumatore che acquista costantemente prodotti eco-compatibili e che è attivamente interessato ai problemi ambientali e alle sue soluzioni(Banytė et al., 2010).Copyright © FrancoAngeli This work is released under Creative Commons Attribution -Non-Commercial -NoDerivatives License.For terms and conditions of usage please see: http://creativecommons.org ...
Article
Nonostante il crescente interesse emerso in letteratura verso l'innovazione sostenibile, l'attenzione tributata ai modelli di business sostenibili è relativamente nuova.Questo lavoro costituisce un primo passo in questa direzione. Un modello di business sostenibile è il risultato di sinergie tecnologiche e organizzative orientate a nuove modalità di creazione e distribuzione del valore.Viene, dunque, analizzato un emergente modello di business - il business platform ecosystem - in grado di legare insieme (e su più livelli di analisi) le esigenze dei diversi attori socioeconomici e quello delle comunità coinvolte nell'ottica della sostenibilità, integrando la leva tecnologica a quella organizzativa.Il paper indaga, in questa direzione, le condizioni attraverso le quali un business platform ecosystem si evolve in un sustainable business platform ecosystem evidenziando, in particolare, il ruolo fondamentale svolto dal platfotm sponsor e dallo strumento utilizzato da quest'ultimo, l'algoritmo. Il framework proposto può essere utilizzato come guida nell'implementazione di strategie innovative ibride e sostenibili.
... The principle of sustainable development has the potential to help companies to achieve the highest quality of products and services (Banytė, Brazionienė & Gadeikeinė, 2010). However, empirical evidence points to the fact that, among others, excess garbage, pollution, energy and material wastage happen as a result of consumers' consumption behaviour and, therefore, are responsible for the great majority of our environmental problems (Gan et al., 2008). ...
Article
Full-text available
The effects of global warming and the changing climatic conditions have increased the need for environmentally friendly products. South Africa, as a developing nation, has not developed sufficient infrastructure for sustainable behaviour and for this reason its consumers have little exposure to sustainability practices compared to the developed countries. The purpose of this study was to investigate the purchase intention of South African consumers towards environmentally friendly products using the Theory of Planned Behaviour. A self-administered questionnaire was distributed among South African consumers and a total of 200 questionnaires were deemed valid for analysis. Factor analysis was used to identify the factors that influence purchase intention of environmentally friendly products. Correlation analysis was used to establish the relationship among variables. Regression analysis was used to investigate the predictive influence of independent variables on the dependent variable. A statistically significant correlation between the factors that influence purchase intention of environmentally friendly products and purchase intention was found. Regression analysis indicated that attitudes and subjective norms had an insignificant influence on the purchase intention of environmentally friendly products. Conversely, perceived behavioural control, environmental concern and environmental knowledge contributed significantly towards the intention to purchase environmentally friendly products. Tangible action is required to encourage everyone to know and understand the significance of purchasing environmentally friendly products.
... Adicionalmente, a mudança de paradigma de consumo inclui custos e sacrifícios como, mudanças no estilo de vida, custos maiores, dentre outros, o que pode reduzir o engajamento nestes assuntos. Follows e Jobber (2000) ressaltam que um alto percentual de consumidores -entre 60 e 90 por cento -se preocupam com o impacto ambiental das suas compras, mas não suficientemente como para mudar os hábitos e engajarse em consumo consciente (Banytė, Brazionienė, & Gadeikienė, 2010). Pepper et al. (2009) manifestam que um fator chave no consumo consciente é consumir menos ou diferentemente. ...
Article
Full-text available
A preocupação com o consumo sustentável é multidisciplinar e universal, seja pela ciência do ser humano acerca de suas limitações na obtenção de recursos ou pela consciência de que as tendências atuais do comportamento de consumo são insustentáveis. Existe na literatura uma variedade de termos e posturas relacionadas ao consumo consciente que podem induzir a confusão, dentre elas: consumo consciente, sustentável, verde, solidário, justo, ético, ecológico, que são expressões da mesma genealogia com sutis diferenças, evidenciando a incipiência do entendimento desta temática. A raiz do problema parece ser que não há consenso no entendimento do próprio ato de consumir, pois algumas posturas focam no consumo consciente como sendo centrado no indivíduo, enquanto outras reconhecem sua natureza coletiva e derivada da normatividade da sociedade circundante e induzida pelo contexto e convenções sociais. O propósito deste ensaio foi analisar estas questões, identificando as temáticas prevalentes sobre consumo consciente ou sustentável, identificando as visões individualistas e coletivistas e apontando os estudos acadêmicos relevantes e suas implicações.
... Moreover, other studies have also suggested that femininity and "greenness" have come to be cognitively linked (by men and women), and this is largely evidence by many green marketing efforts targeting areas in which "women tend to be more involved than men, such as cleaning, food preparation, family health, laundry, and domestic maintenance" (Brough et al., 2016, p. 568), with most eco-friendly products being marketed to women. Past findings have also revealed that female buyers are likely to respond favorably to eco-labels, green claims and environmental branding, in particular toward cosmetics and beauty care products (Thøgersen et al., 2010;Banytė et al., 2010) In addition, several studies have indicated factors such as "animal welfare," "environmental concern," "health" and "safety" are major factors motivating female shoppers to purchase green cosmetics and beauty care products (Singhal & Malik, 2018;Pudaruth et al., 2015;Tsakiridou et al., 2008;Cervellon et al., 2010). Organic beauty products are perceived as possessing higher quality, being good for health and safer due to the avoided risk of pesticide residues often found in cosmetics and beauty products (Pudaruth et al., 2015). ...
Conference Paper
Increased awareness for social and environmental welfare has created a desire for greener and ethical lifestyle, inducing a change in consumer behaviour towards greener product preferences. Despite consumers’ increasing demand towards green cosmetics, limited research has been conducted to investigate consumers’ attitude and intention toward green cosmetics. Applying the Theory of Planned Behaviour (TPB), this research aims to examine the factors that influence the consumers’ attitude and purchase intention towards green cosmetics across two socio-economically different markets – Australia and South Africa. The research will also investigate the moderating role of consumers’ environmental knowledge on the relationship between attitude and purchase intention. This study will adopt a quantitative methodology and sampling frame of female consumers who have been identified as the most potential consumers for green cosmetics. The findings of this research will contribute to a better understanding of the green consumption behavior from both academic and managerial perspectives.
... e sample had characteristics of individuals that typically demonstrate higher environmental consciousness. In Lithuania, educated middle aged women with middle income (1200-2000 Lt) are the most eco-friendly when related to purchases (Banytė, Brazionienė & Gadeikienė, 2010). erefore it is likely that relationships among values, pro-environmental concern, environmental knowledge, a itudes and intentions to purchase ecological brands would be allocated di erently (presumably, weaker) among other consumer groups. ...
Article
Full-text available
Current environmental trends in production and marketing resulted in a close-loop situation, when on the one hand consumers demand environmentally friendly and ecological products and are ready to pay price premiums for them, on the other hand, marketers explore usage of environmentally friendly brands and labels as a competitive advantage. Both local and international brands compete in the market of ecological products. However, consumer propensity to purchase ecological brands differs, as this variable can be a function of a number of factors. The paper analyses the impact of consumer values, perceived environmental knowledge and pro-environmental concern on consumer attitudes towards ecological brands (local or international), and the influence of consumer attitude elements on intention to purchase local vs. foreign ecological brands in the industry of face and body care. Lithuanian women were polled to determine the relationship of these variables. The results indicate that the attitude towards an ecological product is related to the value of a sense of belonging and pro-environmental concern; intention to purchase a local brand is predicted by the attitude towards the local brand only, whereas intention to purchase an international brand is predicted by the attitude towards an international and ecological brand, and negatively correlates with the attitude towards a local brand.
... Consumer perceptions of remanufactured consumer products are a crucial component of sustainability in the remanufacturing industry (Shao et al., 2016). Consumers consider green issues in their purchase decisions (Banytė et al., 2010;Schlegelmilch et al., 1996;Young et al., 2010), and there is already an increasing demand for product-level sustainability information (Grunert et al., 2014;Marucheck et al., 2011). Consumers are demanding more information about products' supply chains and production history (Marucheck et al., 2011), and are ready to pay a premium for a product that offers full transparency on such information (Owusu and Anifori, 2013;Xu et al., 2012). ...
Article
Full-text available
Purpose –Although China can be considered an early adopter of the circular economy, there are few studies of remanufacturing business models in the context of the Chinese automobile industry. This study investigates viable business models, summarizes current obstacles, and anticipates future development opportunities and directions. Design/methodology/approach –The cross-case analysis considers the roles of value networks and of customer value proposition and interface in circular business models by examining the strategies and tactical measures of two leading remanufacturers. The data are collected from semi-structured interviews, documents, etc. Findings –The analysis identifies the following components of viable business models of remanufacturers: reclaiming raw material, managing used components, developing production technologies and processes, and marketing. Several current obstacles are summarized from four perspectives: policy barriers and insufficient government support; a lack of consumer awareness; related product quality; and technology. The study also identifies future directions and opportunities for the automobile parts remanufacturing industry. Originality/value –This study contributes to the circular business model literature by mapping the barriers and opportunities in remanufacturing. The results have shed some light into the field of sustainability in manufacturing firms by empirically testing the theoretical model. The results will help managers to design viable circular business models in different contexts. Keywords: circular business models, automobile, remanufacturing, circular economy, obstacles
... In the literature of green awareness, it is the key element to decide on sustainable consumption behaviour of consumers. Consumers are aware of green issues like depleting natural resources, global warming, and pollution and consider them when making green products purchase decisions (Banytė, Brazionienė, & Gadeikienė, 2010;Schlegelmilch, Bohlen, & Diamantopoulos, 1996;Young, Hwang, McDonald, & Oates, 2010). Consumers purchasing intention and behaviour are pointing towards green products (Lin & Niu, 2018). ...
Article
The aim of this paper is to explore the environmental value of the Maker movement, which is driving digital fabrication into the mainstream. Makers are inspiring each other to create smart solutions for all types of individual needs and address societal and environmental challenges at the same time. They share their creative ideas and solutions in collaborative work spaces and Maker Faires or on social media platforms. Is this grassroots innovation the beginning of the next industrial revolution? This paper will explore the environmental value and impact of makers' innovative business model and discuss on how to increase the circularity. At the same time, we will describe the role of maker communities and how to help to play a better role. In the framework of a case study analysis based on 10 different Maker initiatives across Europe, 39 interviews were conducted with makers and Maker initiatives managers evaluating core questions such as potential environmental value and impact, value chains, and energy efficient behaviours. This study is expected to contribute to building an explorative but yet empirically rooted analysis of the environmental value and impact of the Maker movement. Furthermore, the challenges in the future and the suggestions for policy makers are provided.
... The demand for organic products in recent years is widely increasing due to socio-economic enhancement and increase in health and eco-friendly awareness among the consumers. The awareness and knowledge with respect to organic products usage is also gradually increasing among the today's consumer [1][2][3][4][5]. India is one of the predominant countries which exports more organic products to other countries across the globe. ...
Article
Full-text available
The aim of this research is to understand the consumer behavior, attitude and usage purposes of organic products in their daily life. The researcher was adopted survey method to collect responses from 100 organic product consumers residing in Chennai city of Tamil Nadu. The empirical results indicate that nine dimensions of usage purposes of organic products were explored and the entire organic product consumers covered in this survey are significantly classified into two groups such as, high users and moderate users based on their attitude towards organic products consumption. To conclude, consumers are advised to use more organic products due to health concern, and environmental concern.
... The demand for organic products in recent years is widely increasing due to socio-economic enhancement and increase in health and eco-friendly awareness among the consumers. The awareness and knowledge with respect to organic products usage is also gradually increasing among the today's consumer [1][2][3][4][5]. India is one of the predominant countries which exports more organic products to other countries across the globe. ...
Article
Full-text available
This marketing research was conducted to explore the dominant dimensions of consumer preference towards organic products in Chennai city of Tamil Nadu. The researcher has adopted survey method to gather the responses from the organic consumers through structured questionnaire. The empirical evidences proves that, Eco-Friendly, Price, Health, Environmental Conservation, Adequate Availability of Products, Safety, Chemical Free, Consumer Attitude and Environmental Non-Degradation are the dominant dimensions of consumer preference towards organic products consumption and they are highly correlated to each other. © 2018, Indian Journal of Public Health Research and Development. All rights reserved.
... The online channel will not only improve the responsiveness and efficiency of recycling, but also enhance the quality and conversion rate of recycling to reduce the pollution emissions to the environment through direct contact between the consumers and a professional recycling center [7]. On the other hand, consumer's awareness of sustainability is defined as consumer who constantly buys eco-friendly products and is actively concerned with sustainable issues and solutions to them [8]. Moreover, some scholars pointed out that consumers' awareness of sustainability also involves the choice of recycling behavior [9,10]. ...
Article
Full-text available
With the prevalence of Internet technology, many recycling centers have developed a dual-channel reverse supply chain by introducing online recycling channels on the basis of offline third-party recyclers (TPR). In addition, great imbalanced development has been observed in different regions in China, as supported by the literature review. It is necessary to help companies in the supply chain to adjust their pricing strategies according to regional differences. This paper is aimed at answering the following two questions: (1) After introducing online channels, what strategies should the recycling center adopt to adjust online recycling prices and to readjust the transfer price of offline channels? (2) How do recycling centers and TPR in city A & B modify their pricing strategies in accordance with logistics costs or consumers’ awareness of sustainability changes in city B? To solve the above questions, models were made to study the pricing strategies of recycling centers and the TPR based on the Stackelberg game in a dual-channel reverse supply chain in two cities. The results indicate that recycling centers will benefit from the increase in consumers’ awareness of sustainability and the reduction in logistics costs of the online channel in city B; this is in contrast to the TPR in this city. We also find that the revenue of the TPR in city A will be affected when the above two factors in city B change. Its increase or decrease depends on the selection of pricing strategy by the recycling center.
... Wind [15] and Ščypa [16] argued that green consumers are those who buy eco-friendly products not because of being fashionable, but because of caring about environmental issues. This definition of green consumers is also supported by Banytė, Brazionienė and Gadeikienė [18]. ...
Article
Full-text available
The Green Initiative's main objectives include the offsetting of greenhouse gases emitted by human activities, as well as reforestation projects in riparian areas that need to be recovered. Governments make and implement sustainable development laws, policies, strategies, standards, programs, agreements with other countries, and actions. Governments in many countries and regions have used legislation and policies to exert pressure on the core manufacturers in the green consumerism movement to develop green products. This study aims to examine the role of the government in green consumerism practices. For that reason, a majority of the respondents are not satisfied by the role of the government in promoting green consumerism practise. For that reason, the government should conduct an awareness programme and should give awards to retailers/manufacturers.
Article
Full-text available
This paper presents the result of a research of the literature regarding circular economy, green trends in marketing, green IoT and consumer experience. Green concept was the main driver to link current marketing strategies for a sustainable consumer experience seen through consumers’ buying behaviour nowadays. The key aspects of this paper consist of analysing the basic concepts of green IoT and green marketing, combined to create a greener consumer experience, becoming a meaningful part of the circular economy. Climate change and protecting our environment are the biggest challenges of the modern world. Energy consumption is at the highest level ever, and a solution addressed to these challenges should be found in order for businesses and consumers to fulfil their needs. Circular economy is considered also part of the solution, but people should become more aware about the principle of circularity, and what it means in practice. Considering applying green marketing and green IoT concepts into practice, this paper could offer a solution. Even if the green concept should be applied by both businesses and consumers, we didn’t cover the consumer side, more specifically how they should act upon to become “greener” in their choices. Further research could be explored to find ways and means to educate the consumers.
Conference Paper
Full-text available
Marketing is a process of activities which include institutions and set of processes for linking, comminuting, and delivering to consumers, partners and society at large. But, traditional marketing was not fulfilling the concept of social responsibility at large and new concept of Green Marketing was invented. In this concept eco-friendly practices was merged with traditional marketing to make it more effective and less harmful for environment. The world is still struggling with pandemic (Covid-19) which has already reveled the weakness and strengths of our society. Its impact has created a body loss, mental loss and monetary loss. Sustainable processes like green marketing dully fulfill the concept of both marketing and social responsibility with its long term positive effects to consumers and to society at large. Green Product Marketing usually refers to the processes and practices of advertising and developing products & services on eco-friendly objectives which are sustainable for long. It is regarded as a process which reduces the costs and target eco-sensitive market segments. Generally, now we can see fast growth of the moral sense for the environmental protection in large sphere of the purchasing population. Consumers are also accepting the sustainable product & services and ok with some more cost of eco-friendly products to make their immune system good & healthy after use. This research paper makes a study of both the concept of marketing and its social responsibility for both consumers and produces. This research study is established on secondary collected data from different online/offline sources which are analyzed and written, which include research papers by different researchers, articles, journals, congress proceedings, conference proceedings, periodicals, text books and digital available data analyzed for relevant application of Green concepts with social responsibility. Keywords: Eco-friendly marketing and traditional marketing, Corporate Responsibility, Corporate Accountability, Social Responsibility, Concepts, Impact of Covid-19 on green marketing with increase in more social responsibility.
Article
Full-text available
En la actualidad son escasas las investigaciones científicas acerca del consumo sostenible en productos de aseo personal en países como Colombia. Por esta razón, el objetivo del estudio se orientó a analizar a los compradores de productos de la categoría de aseo personal en general que visitan formatos de gran descuento en sus prácticas cotidianas e intenciones en una compra sostenible al momento de elegir productos con el fin de segmentarlos o agruparlos para desarrollar estrategias eficientes de mercadeo. Se empleó un enfoque cuantitativo con un alcance descriptivo correlacional para analizar la relación entre las prácticas ambientales de los consumidores y la intención de compra de productos de aseo personal. En la etapa de análisis se utilizó el agrupamiento jerárquico acompañado de un Análisis de Componentes Principales (ACP) para proyectar los segmentos en las dimensiones encontradas. Los resultados cuantitativos nos demuestran tres grandes segmentos con características sociodemográficas, prácticas e intenciones diferentes para cada grupo. Con esta información las empresas que comercializan estos productos de aseo podrán crear y potencializar sus estrategias para fidelizar y aumentar ventas en los nuevos segmentos de consumidores sostenibles generando el impacto que necesita el planeta y sociedad.
Article
Full-text available
The increase in the number of consumers who choose to focus on sustainable consumption has led companies to develop a series of solutions to match their needs and desires. Developing a brand that integrates the green philosophy of the organization can result in a heightened attachment to the brand from receptive consumers to the ecological principles. In this context, the concept of green brand has begun to attract the attention of many brand management practitioners and academics. However, at the organizational level, the decision to associate a series of green values with a brand is not a sufficient measure to classify the brand as a green brand. For this reason, it is necessary to define the concept of green brand, starting from the opinions expressed by the specialists in the field. Therefore, this paper follows an exploratory approach in terms of defining the green brand and highlighting its specific features. Additionally, the dimensions of brand equity will be customized for a green brand. At the practical level, companies have the possibility to create a new green brand or they can resort to a brand extension. These alternatives are presented in the paper.
Technical Report
The main goal of the study was to see whether displaying product lifetime would influence a consumer's decision to purchase. In other words, would our consumption patterns change if the lifetime was indicated? Would we choose the same products if we had this information? The research concluded that no, we would not. The experiment involved a sample of 2 917 participants scattered over five European countries (Belgium, Czech Republic France, Spain and the Netherlands). It was based on a simulated online purchase and so the bogus e-commerce site ILICO was designed. Consumers could surf on this site just as if it were a real e-commerce site, and once their basket had been validated, participants were directed to a questionnaire which gauged various socio-economic and psycho-social indicators. The results showed that if they had information on product lifetime, consumers would choose to buy longer-lasting products: on average, a product's sales increased by 56% if its lifetime was longer than the lifetime of competing products.
Article
Full-text available
The paper focuses on the recent trends in marketing eco friendly products. The researchers have analyzed the reasons for consumers opting to buy eco friendly green products. Raising awareness on the safety of the earth and the responsibility in every individual to handover a safe environment to the future progenies has acted as a stimulus for this study. The researchers made a deep study into the various eco friendly green products that are used by consumers and have identified the potential gaps for the marketers to tap their sale. The paper suggests possible suggestions to attract consumers and reasons for the lack in sale. The paper focuses also on the consumer's buying value and their attitude towards the recent products in the market.
Article
Full-text available
Health insurance in India is a growing segment of India's economy. In India there is a lack of awareness regarding tools called health insurance. Unlike other segments, Health Insurance is a more complex business because of serious conflicts arising out of unavailability of data and information gap problems. Proper understanding of Indian Health situation and application of principles of insurance, keeping in view the social realities and national objectives, are important. Hence this study attempts to understand the factors that influence the rural people for availing or not availing health insurance policy. Objectives of the study are a) To study the factors influencing the rural people to avail health insurance policy b) To examine the determinants influencing the rural people not to avail health insurance policy c) To understand the association between demography of respondents (with respect to age, educational qualification and monthly family income) and determinants of availing health insurance policy. Null hypothesis was framed to test the association between demography of respondents (age, educational qualification and monthly family income) and the determinants of availing health insurance policy. Primary data was collected from 150 respondents identified by Stratified Random Sampling technique representing rural area of Thanjavore District using structured questionnaire. The data was processed and analysed using SPSS package Version 11 and various statistical tools like f-test and t-test were used for discussion. The study results revealed that educational qualification, age, and family income are the major factors which influence the rural people to avail health insurance policy; gender and marital status are the major factors which prevents the rural people of the study area to avail health insurance policy; Also there is significant difference between the demography of the respondents and the determinants of availing health insurance.
Article
Full-text available
This study helps in mapping the consumer's mind and predicting how 'Green Consumer Behaviour' depicts 'Marketing Mix' towards identifying major factors affecting green purchase behaviour. Various articles explored under the green purchase and various motives, facilitators and barriers affecting green product purchase decisions were reviewed. Concern, Collectivism, eco-literacy, perceived consumer effectiveness and social influence were identified as the major categories affecting the decision-making process. The outcome is a twofold impact of green purchase behaviour towards designing marketing mix which reinforces consumer behaviour. The paper analysed various strategies towards predicting Green Consumer Behaviour. The paper elucidates the predictors of consumer's green purchase behaviour as a predecessor to Marketing Mix towards assisting managers and policymakers in designing strategies for managing disruptions in organisations.
Article
Full-text available
Following the activities of a tyre recycling company in Johor, Malaysia, over 2000 people fell sick and 111 schools were shut when toxic substances were released into the Sungai Kim Kim, a river in Pasir Gudang. This paper examines the relevance of corporate environmental responsibility (CER) policy framework in ensuring constant environmental sustainability by corporate bodies in Malaysia. The paper adopts a comparative law research methodology to assess the potential impact of environmentally sustainable corporate social responsibility across two jurisdictions i.e., Malaysia and India. Looking at existing CER framework in another jurisdiction, the paper argues that voluntary and mandatory CER can strengthen existing environmental regulations in Malaysia under the environmental regulation in Malaysia.Keywords: Environment, Corporate Environment Responsibility, Malaysia, IndiaeISSN: 2398-4287 © 2019. The Authors. Published for AMER ABRA cE-Bs by e-International Publishing House, Ltd., UK. This is an open access article under the CC BYNC-ND license (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/). Peer–review under responsibility of AMER (Association of Malaysian Environment-Behaviour Researchers), ABRA (Association of Behavioural Researchers on Asians) and cE-Bs (Centre for Environment-Behaviour Studies), Faculty of Architecture, Planning & Surveying, Universiti Teknologi MARA, Malaysia.DOI: https://doi.org/10.21834/e-bpj.v4i11.1662
Article
China is currently the largest CO2 emitter in the world and demonstrates one of the highest levels of energy consumption. The sustainable consumption behavior has increased in China, especially in urban cities. Some clear evidence of this includes food purchasing behavior. Recent studies have also suggested that considering full product information transparency, consumers are willing to pay premium prices for products. With this in mind, sustainable consumption must still be facilitated by related policies, regulations, and tools. This study focuses on sustainable consumption behavior in China and collects and analyzes the literature from the last decade (2007–2017) on the topic. In so doing, it highlights new trends and research topics against the background of circular economy development. The method of systematic review is applied. The review is categorized into several main groups: national policies and regulations, the green awareness of consumers, the definition of related concepts, the barriers between sustainable consumption and the circular economy, and the indicators for circular economy assessment in China. Future research directions are discussed. Furthermore, future challenges are addressed from three perspectives: sustainable consumption facilitating the circular economy, “cradle‐to‐cradle” practices, and the link between the European Union and China. This is a fundamental study in the research domain of sustainable consumption behavior. It provides added value that benefits both academic researchers and decision makers. It also sheds light on the further study of sustainable consumption behavior in China from a macroeconomic perspective.
Chapter
The main purposes of this chapter are to define a green brand, describe its characteristics, and outline its implications. This chapter would help readers understand the need for studying green brand personality and appreciate its importance in the current market scenario. Moreover, it provides a detailed outline of the ways and means that companies can use to market such brands. It highlights the steps companies can take to increase the sales of green brands and get an edge over non-green brands. In addition, it explores certain best practices in the industry to illustrate how well green products can be sold without compromising on sales targets.
Article
Full-text available
Environmental marketing continues to be a heavily researched area, in part due to a heightened awareness and concern for the environment among consumers. An area that has received considerable research attention is the relationship of various environmental attitudes and intentions with environmental behavioral outcomes. The conventional approach has been to linearly relate environmental attitudes and intentions among themselves and with behavioral outcomes, even though no clear pattern has emerged. The objective of the study is to understand the impact of factors influencing environmentally responsive consumption behavior on purchase intentions and purchase behavior. Data were collected from 514 respondents from Delhi. From the findings of this article, it can be stated that purchase behavior is the direct outcome of purchase intention. Further, purchase intention shows direct significant relationship, with subjective norm, attitude toward the behavior, willingness to pay, environmental consciousness, green self-identity, and perceived behavior control.
Article
Building on arguments relating to the differences between innovation and innovativeness and their influences on brand loyalty, this study investigates how green brand innovativeness and value perception influence green brand loyalty. In addition, the influences of a mediating variable green perceived value (GPV) and a moderating variable (consumer green knowledge) on the development process of green brand loyalty are examined. Data were collected using an online survey administered to a consumer panel in China, and structural equation modelling (SEM) was used to test the conceptual model with a sample of 826 Chinese respondents. The results demonstrate that green brand innovativeness was directly associated with brand loyalty and indirectly influenced brand loyalty via GPV. Moreover, green knowledge significantly moderated the relationship between green brand innovativeness and GPV. Therefore, to promote green brand loyalty, organizations must allocate resources into enhancing consumers’ perceptions of green brand innovativeness and green value, and improving their environmental knowledge.
Chapter
Full-text available
The main purposes of this chapter are to define a green brand, describe its characteristics, and outline its implications. This chapter would help readers understand the need for studying green brand personality and appreciate its importance in the current market scenario. Moreover, it provides a detailed outline of the ways and means that companies can use to market such brands. It highlights the steps companies can take to increase the sales of green brands and get an edge over non-green brands. In addition, it explores certain best practices in the industry to illustrate how well green products can be sold without compromising on sales targets.
Article
Full-text available
Looking to the future of green marketing, examines the dynamic nature of ecologically conscious consumer behavior. The study also provides a method of profiling and segmenting college students based upon ecologically conscious consumer behavior. Findings indicate that, despite a significant amount of past research attention, demographic criteria are not as useful a profiling method as psychographic criteria. Consistent with past findings, the study indicates that perceived consumer effectiveness (PCE) provides the greatest insight into ecologically conscious consumer behavior. Further, the inclusion of altruism to the profile appears to add significantly to past efforts. Additional constructs examined suggest that environmental segmentation alternatives are more stable than past profiles that have relied primarily on demographic criteria.
Article
Full-text available
b>Purpose - Despite research studies indicating strong support for labelling information, uncertainty remains with respect to how labels influence consumers. This paper attempts to empirically investigate how consumers who differ in terms of environmentalism respond to labels. Design/methodology/approach - The data were collected on an Australian sample using a structured questionnaire administered on the phone using quantum research (CATI) data collection services. A total of 155 questionnaires were completed and used for data analysis. The data were analysed using both descriptive measures and correlations between variables. Findings - There appears to be a proportion of consumers that find product labels hard to understand. The research found that there are consumers who will buy green products even if they are lower in quality in comparison to alternative products, but would look for environmental information on labels. With respect to price sensitive green consumers, there appears to be a relationship between price sensitivity and 'always' reading labels as well as indicating that there is 'sufficient' information on product labels to make informed purchase decisions. Research limitations/implications - It was beyond the scope of the research to account for some of the utilitarian approaches to interpretation or in-depth comprehension of label information. The sample size of 155, although selected using a probability method, may, to some extent, limit the overall accuracy of the results. Practical implications - Offers some important information on different green consumer segments that would alert managers on how best to position environmental labels. Findings such as 'Satisfied with labels' correlates with 'Labels are accurate', which suggests that businesses need to provide a clear, accurate and easily legible label design to encourage satisfaction with the accuracy of content and the communication aspects of a label. Originality/value - Contributes to better understanding of green customers purchase intentions and the usefulness of ecological product labels. It offers some insights and assistance to businesses in planning their green product/labelling strategies.<br /
Article
Full-text available
Purpose Despite growing awareness of ethical and social responsibility (E&SR) issues in academia and industry, investigation of their influence on consumers' buying decisions has been limited. To help fill this gap, this paper reports the findings of a preliminary investigation to establish the key E&SR factors affecting grocery shopping behaviour. Design/methodology/approach The study drew upon existing literature in the areas of ethics, social responsibility, shopping and store image to identify the individual elements of E&SR. An exploratory qualitative study of E&SR consumers (E&SRC) was then conducted, using seven focus groups, and a typology of key factors of concern to these consumers was derived from analysis. Findings The findings identify seven core categories, containing seventy‐one sub‐categories. These interlink to form three main clusters: food quality and safety, human rights and ethical trading, and environmental (green) issues. Shoppers trade off these E&SR factors against standard retail purchasing factors, in particular convenience, price and merchandise range when deciding which shops to use and what products to buy. Research limitations/implications The typology derived from this exploratory research may be used alongside conventional store image factors in future research, to help predict those factors that influence purchasing behaviour. Similarly, it may assist brand and retail managers in profiling, and meeting the needs of, E&SRC. Originality/value The research distinguishes differences in how shopper types vary in their behaviour, and proposes a set of implications for managers of the research and areas for further investigation.
Article
Full-text available
Socially responsible investment (SRI) has gained importance as about one out of eight US dollars is currently invested based on screening in the USA. However, European private investors are generally much more reluctant to invest in shares, and in Austria, only 7 percent of private households hold shares. There is nevertheless some interest in “green shares” (a sub-class of SRI comprising shares that are screened for their least impact on the environment) as a representative survey recently exhibited that 8 percent of respondents were definitely interested in holding “green shares”. Econometric estimates of an empirical model explaining the respondents' willingness to invest in green shares showed that education, income, environmental awareness and the expected profit are the main explanatory variables. Based on these results, conclusions are drawn regarding marketing strategies for “green shares”. In particular, credibility both regarding financial aspects (competitive return), and environmental and social criteria have to be guaranteed to make more consumers interested in investing in green shares.
Article
Full-text available
Purpose The objective of this paper is to investigate if marketing and branding techniques can help establish green brands and introduce greener patterns of consumption into contemporary lifestyles in the current context where environmentally friendly products are increasingly available. Design/methodology/approach This paper reviews consumer behaviour and advertising to identify how consumers are persuaded to opt for greener products. It reports the results of a consumer product survey using a questionnaire based on the Dunlap and van Liere HEP‐NEP environmental survey and the Roper Starch Worldwide environmental behaviour survey. The respondents were 52 mothers who shop at supermarkets. Findings The results show a correlation between consumer confidence in the performance of green products and their pro‐environmental beliefs in general. The findings suggest that most consumers cannot easily identify greener products (apart from cleaning products) although they would favour products manufactured by greener companies, and they do not find the current product marketing particularly relevant or engaging. Practical implications The paper suggests that the market for greener products could be exploited more within consumer groups that have pro‐environmental values. Originality/value This paper identifies that consumers are not exposed enough to green product marketing communication and suggests the greater use of marketing and brands to promote and sell products that are environmentally friendly and function effectively.
Article
Full-text available
This paper focuses on a growing interest in green marketing and its sustainable incentives via greening strategy and ecological labelling practices, especially in Europe and with a separate case in Lithuania. The article deals with the issues of environmental (eco-) marketing and ecological labelling to ensure that consumers have access to ecological products and services and they might adjust their preferences towards environmentally-friendly business practices. For business world-wide, ecological marketing and its applications in practice have become a competitive prerogative for modern business performance.
Article
Full-text available
Business School Sauletekio av. 22, LT-10225 Vilnius, Lithuania juozas.ruzevicius@ef.vu.lt This article presents an analysis of changes in the development and expansion of implementation of organizations'' environmental protection measures, as influenced by globalization and internationalization processes on the world's economy and various fields of activity, and their impact on competitiveness. The study describes the system of international environmental certification and other sustainable development protection measures, encompassing the eco-labeling of products, accommodation and recreation services, forest and timber supply chains, the energy certification of buildings, the ISO ecological and ergonomic certification of computer equipment and mobile phones, identification of packaging materials, environmental management systems (EMS) certification, etc. The article also presents the international benchmarking of the ecological footprint – an integral indicator reflecting sustainable development. It should be noted that the current level of human consumption already exceeds the Earth's ecological potential, i.e., the ecological footprint of all the countries in the world exceeds nature's capacity for regeneration. Lithuania has a positive ecological balance, meanwhile, the ecological footprint of the Ukraine and Belarus exceeds the country's biological potential respectively by 0.3 and 0.4 global hectares per person. The features and problem areas of EMS (namely, ISO 14001 and EMAS), and the process of implementation of other measures in Lithuania and in an international context are also presented. For a more objective comparison of sustainable development in individual countries and regions, the author suggests the use of a new indicator – the number of certificates (ISO 14001, EMAS, ecological products, etc.) per 1 million inhabitants of a country's total population. Although there was a marked increase in the implementation of ISO 14001 systems in recent years, according to the number of implemented environmental management systems per 1 million inhabitants, Lithuania lags considerably behind not only the most developed nations, but also some of the new EU countries. To date, there are no EMAS environmental systems in place in Lithuania, yet they are being successfully implemented in other EU countries and in the neighbouring Baltic countries. The main reason why this type of system of environmental measures has not been implemented in Lithuania is an inadequate understanding on the part of the leaders of organizations of the essential differences between EMAS and ISO 14001 (this was noted by 89% of respondents). It is recommended that the government institutions responsible for formulating Lithuania's environmental policies boost their environmental certification infrastructure, carry out the realistic development of "green purchases", and encourage Lithuanian organizations to create and certify EMAS environmental systems, while secondary schools should be drawn into the globally acknowledged and effective Kids' ISO 14000 programs. The implementation of such a program in our country is very important and deserves to receive government funding as well as funding from business organizations declaring their social responsibility. The education of children in environmental awareness is one of the most important ways to solve environmental concerns in Lithuania and throughout the world, and to develop the way towards creating an ecological balance. Effective environmental education should also involve tertiary students from all disciplines, business enterprises, and public sector and government administration institutions.
Article
Full-text available
The problem of the use of indicators and indexes for the assessment of sustainable development is analyzed in the work. As the objectives, for this the concept of sustainability indicators and indices is analyzed. Then the analysis of the concept of sustainable development is given. After this the analysis of the methodological principles of sustainability indicators and indices development is provided. The methods of systematic scientific literature analysis, general and logical analysis, comparison and generalization were used in the article. Sustainability assessment currently arises as comprehensive, integrated, and provident decision-making approach. Ignorance of sustainability turns our future into more risky one. Thus sustainability indicators and indices, which have to measure features and processes of human and environmental systems that should guarantee continuality and functionality, might be discussed. In order to manage sustainability, society has to formulate clear and measurable goals of sustainability that should be continuously revised and corrected. The level, at which these goals are implemented, might be measured using sustainable development indicators, i.e. definable and measurable parameters, which show values and trends of development of ecologic, economic, and social stability of a particular region. Speaking about sustainability indicators, we should take into consideration the fact that any separate aggregated indicator does not foresee interchange among three main dimensions analysed in environmental economics: effectiveness, justice and sustainability. Perfect indicators are uncommon; therefore, their development in a general case involves methodological compromise among technical feasibility, public availability to use, and systemic consistency. The effectiveness of sustainability indicators can be characterised by three attributes: credibility, legitimacy, and salience. Sustainable development is a multi-dimensional issue involving huge amounts of complex information. There is some need to systematically reduce this information to a more concentrated form while constructingthe pyramid of information aggregation, at the base of which are raw data and at the top there are indexes. The new primary classification suggested by Bell and Morse (2001) is based on who has set the indicators and how they have been set, with an additional dimension related to whether the sustainability indicator is quantitative or qualitative. When choosing particular sustainability indicators, following principles of sustainable development should be taken into account: a) social justice; b) local government, public participation, democracy; c) sustainable balance between local and imported resources consumption; d) use of local economic potential; e) environmental protection; f) protection of cultural heritage, protection and regeneration of a new environmental quality, increase in functionality and attraction of area and buildings maintained. Economic effectiveness itself does not guarantee ecologic and social sustainability because economic indicators used do not reflect it. Therefore, assessment of sustainable development needs integrated approach, a set of multi-dimensional indicators, which evaluate both separate parts of the system and their relationships.
Article
Full-text available
Studies of green behavior have awakened a growing interest, since the accelerated environmental degradation is partly attributed to a lack of such behavior. However it is not an easy task to modify consumer habits and influence the be-havior of individuals. This paper summarizes variables extracted from four models of green behavior in five core groups: orientation man-nature, perceived control, ecological knowledge, personal consequences and environmental consequences, with a special focus on the Mexican individuals as an example of application of environmental marketing strategies. Analysis shows that in spite of efforts done in environmental management in Mexico, one of the 12 environ-mentally megadiverse country of the world, there is a big gap between official programs to protect environment and social participation. In the particular case of Mexico, it is recommended to relate environmental issues to survival process, in order to apply efficient environmental marketing strategies.
Article
Full-text available
This research examined the demographic profiles of Australian green consumers in relation to their satisfaction of environmental labelling. It examined consumers’ understanding of labelling and empirically investigated the association of demographic profile of consumers with their attitudes towards such labels. The results indicated that some of the demographic variables were significant, which is largely consistent with earlier findings by other researchers in this area. Label dissatisfaction was higher in the older and middle age respondents. However, some respondents disagreed that labels were accurate while commenting that labels were easy to understand. The key issue arising from the findings is that in order to provide perception of accuracy in labels, it is an option to use Type I or Type III labelling on products. These labels are, arguably, more credible because they are endorsed by third party labelling experts. This would come at a cost and for green products that use third party labelling, they will also have to bear in mind to keep the prices competitive.
Article
Full-text available
This article analyzes the peculiarities and develop-ment of the socially responsible business and conception of the corporate social responsibility (CSR). The CSR concept and those already being as part of socially re-sponsible business, more and more often require the ade-quate behavior from the supply chain partners as well. The main purpose of this article is to initiate the peculi-arities of the content and practice of socially responsible businesses worldwide and in Lithuania, as well as to de-termine the national companies‟ evaluation of the socially responsible business development and its main benefits. Modern organizations are implementing mandatory as well as voluntary management systems. Management system that is based on social responsibility requirements fall to voluntary system category. Every organization chooses how it would like to implement the corporate social responsibility and accountability concept into its daily practices. One of the best known international net-works of socially responsible businesses is Global Com-pact (GC), presented by the United Nations (UN) in 1999. Global Compact seeking two main goals: firstly – to help organizations to implement the principles of GC into business strategy, secondly – to force communication and partnership between various sectors inside and outside the country while seeking universal aims of world‟s de-velopment. Lithuania set the national network of GC in 2005. Today, this national network in Lithuania contains forty two organizations. Other organizations choose standardized management systems of social accountability - SA 8000. Despite the fact that there are over 1000 certified organizations over the world, Lithuania makes its first steps in the area. SC “Utenos Trikotaţas” is the first and the only company at the moment, which implemented and certified its socially responsible management system according to SA 8000 requirements in 2006. This company has other evident achievements, showing its socially responsible business – significant part of its production is certified and marked with “EU flower” and “Öeko-Tex” environmental marks. In 2001 the company implemented environmental man-agement system according to ISO 14000. The daughter Ukrainian enterprise “Mriya” is encouraged and sup-ported by “Utenos Trikotaţas” SC to implement princi-ples, best practices and requirements of standards men-tioned aboveBut there are lack of scientific resumes about the pe-culiarities of design and implementation of social respon-sibility standards, links between other management sys-tems and resulting benefits. This paper provides the analysis of peculiarities when implementing SA 8000 system, it provides the new model of “cause-effect” cycle and continuous improvement in business organization. The paper reveals that certification of social accountabil-ity and responsibility system is not only to gain competi-tive advantage, but also it is a tool to reveal strengths and weaknesses of the company. Innovative Lithuanian companies are spreading the best business practices, in-cluding experience of social responsibility, to organiza-tions from other countries accessing into EU.
Article
Full-text available
While conventional farming systems face serious problems of sustainability, organic agriculture is seen as a more environmentally friendly system as it favours renewable resources, recycles nutrients, uses the environment’s own systems for controlling pests and diseases, sustains ecosystems, protects soils, and reduces pollution. At the same time organic farming promotes animal welfare, the use of natural foodstuffs, product diversity and the avoidance of waste, among other practices. However, the future of organic agriculture will depend on its economic viability and on the determination shown by governments to protect these practices. This paper performs panel regressions with a sample of Catalan farms (Spain) to test the influence of organic farming on farm output, costs and incomes. It analyses the cost structures of both types of farming and comments on their social and environmental performance.
Article
The article deals with the issues of environmental (eco-) marketing and ecological labelling to ensure that consumers have access to ecological products and services and they might adjust their preferences towards environmentally friendly business practices. For business worldwide, ecological marketing and its applications in practice have become a competitive prerogative for modern business performance. A survey in Lithuania aimed at establishing, whether customers are loyal to ecological products and whether marketing campaigns and ecological labelling practices did affect their choice of eco-products.
Article
Purpose Business initiatives that improve environmental impact are increasing in number and the trend continues to accelerate. However, there is a growing consensus that transformations to protect the environment and conserve natural resources should be more pervasive and much larger steps than those already being taken are needed. Among the difficult challenges that business leaders and practitioners face today is to understand the driving forces that encourage environmental sustainability in the context of their own operation. This work articulates the key drivers of “green” activities that support environmental stewardship, and their relevance to business management. Design/methodology/approach Environmental stewardship is positioned as a growth area, business leaders are already taking action to apply environmental sustainability principles, and each key driver of environmental stewardship is discussed separately. A rationale for each driver is provided, business management implications are articulated, and real world cases for what businesses are actually doing in the marketplace are described. Findings This work defines the drivers of environmental stewardship for business leaders, and connects those drivers directly to management implications and real world, actual cases of business activity. With this approach and framework, businesses can easily use the same approach to identify which drivers they are responding to, and which others may have gaps that represent a competitive risk if no action is taken. Originality/value Business leaders and practitioners can use insights provided in this work to better understand the driving forces behind environmental improvement actions, and better align their own initiatives to achieve higher business value and environmental stewardship. Without understanding the driving forces behind their actions, businesses are likely to sub‐optimize their transformation initiatives and fail to realize the expected value.
Purpose The study seeks to explore the factors which influence the consumer attitude and behaviour towards green practices in the lodging industry in India and also to explore the consumers' intentions to pay for these practices. Design/methodology/approach A quantitative and qualitative research methodology using a questionnaire along with secondary research has been proposed. A structured questionnaire has been used using convenience‐sampling techniques from National Capital Region in India. Correlation and factor analysis has been used to explore consumers' attitudes and behaviour towards green practices in the lodging industry. Findings The consumers using hotel services are conscious about environmentally friendly practices in India. They patronise the hotels that have adapted green practices though not compromising on service quality. The consumers would prefer to use lodging that follows these practices but are not willing to pay extra for these services. Indian hotels have the competitive advantage over similar products if they follow green practices. Practical implications The hotels would have to invest in environmentally friendly practices and look at long‐term gains. The government needs to acknowledge and institutionalise the practice by instituting rewards and offering benefits in taxes. Originality/value The paper attempts to bring out facts regarding customer buying behaviour towards green practices in the Indian hotel industry. The resource scenario in India is grim with regard to the water and sanitation. The tourism industry has a big responsibility in ensuring that business models adopted are sustainable in the long run and hence the need to imbibe green practices as a preferred business model.
Article
The modern world has led consumers to become increasingly concerned about the environment. Such concerns have begun to be displayed in their purchasing patterns, with consumers increasingly preferring to buy so-called `environmentally friendly products'. Marketing managers have in turn recognised the strategic importance of marketing in finding responses to the `environmental needs' of consumers due to the influence this may have on their consumption habits. The growing number of organisations entering the green product market also indicates the need for suitable segmentation and positioning strategies. This paper focuses on the identification of distinct market segments. Through the use of variables related to the environment, as well as demographic variables, the segments that are occupied by consumers with different sensitivities to environmental matters are identified, and the possible implications of these results for the marketing strategies of companies are also discussed.Journal of Targeting, Measurement and Analysis for Marketing (2009) 17, 17-25; doi:10.1057/jt.2008.28; published online 9 February 2009
Article
This study investigates the influence of three cognitive and attitudinal factors on gender differences in green purchase behaviour. Using a large sample size (n = 1093), a survey has been developed and administered across Egypt. The findings from the multivariate analysis of variance (MANOVA) confirm the influence of consumers’ ecological knowledge, concern and attitude on gender differences in green purchase behaviour. Consistent with previous studies, this study found that women appeared to be less aware of environmental issues compared with men. However, contrary to other studies conducted in the West, men showed more environmental concern and more positive outlook towards green purchase compared with women. The study discusses how the present findings may help policy makers and marketers alike to fine-tune their environmental and marketing programmes.
Article
Since it implies a reduction in the quality and the quantity of the natural resources, environmental degradation is a present day problem that requires immediate solutions. This situation is driving firms to undertake an environmental transformation process with the purpose of reducing the negative externalities that come from their economic activities. Within this context, environmental marketing is an emerging business philosophy by which organizations can address sustainability issues. Moreover, environmental marketing and orientation are seen as valuable strategies to improve a firm’s competitiveness. However, the literature that has analyzed the link between environmental strategies and firms’ results has been inconclusive and contradictory. In this study, we propose and test a model that analyses how the implementation of ecological issues within a firm’s marketing strategy and orientation influences organizational results. Data were obtained through a survey sent to Spanish manufacturing firms. The results show that environmental marketing positively affects firms’ operational and commercial performance and this improvement will influence their economic results. Moreover, environmental marketing is revealed as an excellent strategy to obtain competitive advantages in costs and in product differentiation. Thus, this study agrees with the researchers who affirm that environmental strategies positively affect firm’s competitiveness while reducing environmental impact.
Article
Influence of corporate social responsibility on competitive abilities of corporations is analyzed in the article. While assessing the role of CSR in the processes of competitive advantages formation on the academic ground, the following traditional models of the competitive abilities analysis can be used: the model of five forces, the model of resource based approach and the model of network approach. Every model of the company’s competitive ability analysis has its advantages and disadvantages. Each of them can be useful in researching the connection between competitive advantages and CSR because they emphasize different aspects of the origins and the importance of advantages. The summarized scheme of the formation of competitive advantages, connected with CSR, is presented in the article. Meeting requirements of consumers is considered to be the centre-line of business oriented towards the market. The complex of marketing established for this purpose has to be founded on the principles of social responsibility. Meeting the requirements of consumers the interests of other groups and members of the society must be considered, so it is necessary to find out about these interests during the interactions with stakeholders. The tension between business and society is obviously unprofitable for both sides, thus its prevention and elimination are very important strategically.
Article
Marketing as a powerful instrument is used differently in practice, the way of using depends on the purposes. But the experience shows that the ways of achieving the purposes or even the purposes themselves are not always ethical, do not always satisfy the true values of society. Cultural, historical, experience differences between countries determine different understanding and development of values. Although ethical questions are topical in all countries, as a bigger problem it remains in the transitional countries, in which the worth and the traditions of using them in every day and business situations are still in process. Although Lithuania already exited from the status of transitional country in economic and political senses, it will stay for a while in this status because of transitioning in values.
Corporate social responsibility as a marketing means in Lithuanian business practice
  • J Banytė
  • A Gadeikienė
Banytė, J., Gadeikienė, A. (2008). Corporate social responsibility as a marketing means in Lithuanian business practice. Economics and Management: 2008, 13, 227-238.
Green marketing: avoiding unwanted attention from regulators and lawyers
  • Ch A Cole
  • C N Orman
Cole, Ch. A., Orman, C. N. (2008). Green marketing: avoiding unwanted attention from regulators and lawyers. Legal Backgrounder, 23(19), 1-4.
Ekologiški produktai: prekybos centrai ir vartotojas
  • Z Čeponytė
Čeponytė, Z. (2006). Ekologiški produktai: prekybos centrai ir vartotojas. Marketingas, 3, 34-39.
Sustainable consumption and green marketing: transforming consumer behaviour
  • D Grundey
Grundey, D. (2003). Sustainable consumption and green marketing: transforming consumer behaviour. Transformations in Business & Economics, 2 (1(3)), 20–47.
Už ekologiškas prekes vartotojai pasiryžę mokėti daugiau
  • J Laurinėnaitė
Laurinėnaitė, J. (2007). Už ekologiškas prekes vartotojai pasiryžę mokėti daugiau. Marketingas, 1, 64-65.
Ekologiškų produktų rinkos plėtros tendencijos
  • V Rutkovienė
  • E Ribašauskienė
Rutkovienė, V., Ribašauskienė, E. (2003). Ekologiškų produktų rinkos plėtros tendencijos. Rinkotyra, 2(20), 17-23.
The roles of consumer's knowledge and emotions in ecological issues
  • Shellyana Junaedi
Shellyana Junaedi, M. F. (2007). The roles of consumer's knowledge and emotions in ecological issues. Gadjah Mada International Journal of Business, 9 (1), 81-99.
Маркетинг: вчера, сегодня и завтра
  • М Смолянкина
Смолянкина, М. (2000). Маркетинг: вчера, сегодня и завтра. Маркетинг, 2 (51), 10-23.
Green consumer psychology and buying strategies
  • D E Wind
Wind, D. E. (2004). Green consumer psychology and buying strategies. Prentice Hall.
Teoriniai žaliojo marketingo strategijos formavimo aspektai. Daktaro disertacija
  • V Liesionis
Liesionis, V. (2006). Teoriniai žaliojo marketingo strategijos formavimo aspektai. Daktaro disertacija. Kaunas: Vytauto Didžiojo universitetas.
Etiniai darnaus vystymosi aspektai ir jų ryšys su socialinėmis ir aplinkosauginėmis darnaus vystymosi dimensijomis. Organizacijų vadyba: sisteminiai tyrimai
  • D Štreimikienė
  • N Vasiljevienė
Štreimikienė, D., Vasiljevienė, N. (2004). Etiniai darnaus vystymosi aspektai ir jų ryšys su socialinėmis ir aplinkosauginėmis darnaus vystymosi dimensijomis. Organizacijų vadyba: sisteminiai tyrimai, 32, 189-206.
Ekologiškų maisto produktų rinkos susidarymas Vakarų Lietuvoje
  • M Eidukevičienė
  • A Bučienė
Eidukevičienė, M., Bučienė, A. (2005). Ekologiškų maisto produktų rinkos susidarymas Vakarų Lietuvoje. Tiltai, 2, 45-54.
Kaštų – vertės kainos nustatymo modelis žaliojo marketingo komplekse. Organizacijų vadyba: sisteminiai tyrimai
  • A Bakanauskas
  • V Liesionis
Bakanauskas, A., Liesionis, V. (2002). Kaštų – vertės kainos nustatymo modelis žaliojo marketingo komplekse. Organizacijų vadyba: sisteminiai tyrimai, 24, 21-32.
Marketingas: organizacijų marketingo strategijos ir modeliai
  • J Ramanauskienė
Ramanauskienė, J. (2008). Marketingas: organizacijų marketingo strategijos ir modeliai. Kaunas: VŠĮ Spalvų kraitė.
Darnus ekonomikos vystymasis. Mokomoji knyga
  • R Čiegis
Čiegis, R. (2008). Darnus ekonomikos vystymasis. Mokomoji knyga. Šiauliai: Šiaulių universiteto leidykla.
Ekologiškų produktų realizavimo galimybių tyrimas. Ekonomikos ir vadybos fakulteto 2007 metų mokslinių tyrimų rezultatai
  • A Gargasas
  • J Ramanauskienė
  • R Rukuižienė
Gargasas, A., Ramanauskienė, J., Rukuižienė, R. (2007). Ekologiškų produktų realizavimo galimybių tyrimas. Ekonomikos ir vadybos fakulteto 2007 metų mokslinių tyrimų rezultatai. Mokslinės konferencijos straipsnių rinkinys, 1 (4), 25-30.
Ekologiški produktai. Vartotojų vertinimai. Žemės ūkis
  • D Kšivickienė
Kšivickienė, D. (2006). Ekologiški produktai. Vartotojų vertinimai. Žemės ūkis. 11, 24-25.
Ekologiškų maisto produktų paklausą lemiantys veiksniai. Žemės ūkio mokslai
  • V Rutkovienė
  • G Garliauskienė
Rutkovienė, V., Garliauskienė, G. (2007). Ekologiškų maisto produktų paklausą lemiantys veiksniai. Žemės ūkio mokslai, 14 (2), 66-71.
Экологический маркетинг и потребительскoе поведениe. Ekonomika ir vadyba: aktualijos ir perspektyvos
  • П Щыпа
Щыпа, П. (2006). Экологический маркетинг и потребительскoе поведениe. Ekonomika ir vadyba: aktualijos ir perspektyvos, 2 (7), 156–159.