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Sexual Harassment and Related Behaviours Reported Among Youth from Grade 9 to Grade 11

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... In Malaysia Jamal, who carried out a research on the prevalence of sexual harassment among workers in 2002, they found that 35% of 1483 respondents had experienced at least one episode of sexual harassment in the workplace. Meanwhile, David and Debbie (2008) who undertook a study of 108 students at one of the centers of higher learning in Malaysia found that 87 (80%) of them had experienced sexual harassment. These figures are high, therefore sexual harassment problem in workplace should not be taken likely because it is one of the most difficult problems facing nursing students in recent years; it has been framed as an occupational health hazard posing particular risk to nursing students (Imonikhe et al., 2012). ...
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Sexual harassment behavior is one of the most difficult problems facing internship nursing students in recent years; sexual harassment behavior evokes stronger emotional reactions among student nurses, such as frustration, anger, feeling hurt, fear, resentment, helplessness, anxiety and irritation. Therefore, this study aimed to investigate the effect of an educational guideline program on internship nursing students facing sexual harassment behaviors. A quasi-experimental design was utilized in this study. The study was conducted at Ain Shams university Hospital. purposive sample of 60 student nurses were recruited for this study. Three A structured questionnaire sheet for students which included A demographic characteristics of nurses as age, marital status, Gender, residence, working unit and working shifts. The sheet also included information related to Nurse's knowledge about exposure to sexual harassment, nature of sexual harassment, meaning of sexual harassment, risk factors of sexual harassment, different forms of sexual harassment, the effects of sexual harassment on victims, family and community and the measures used to prevent sexual harassment.; 2) Feeling word checklist; and 3) student nurses experience toward sexual harassment behaviors. The result of this study indicated that the implementation of the educational guideline program showed a highly significant improvement in nurses' level of knowledge about sexual harassment and nurses' reaction and experience toward sexual harassment. The study recommended that, effective policies and procedures to combat this situation are to be established as policies and procedures would empower both administrators and nurses, enabling them to take certain actions against sexual harassment.2-educational program, including nurses, human rights, gender perspective and assertiveness training are needed for both clinical and student nurses assertive attitude that could help nurses discourage patients from engaging in inappropriate sexual behavior. [Galila Shawky El-Ganzory; Manal Houssien Nasr and Amal Talaat. Effect of Educational Guidelines Program on Internship Nursing Students Facing Sexual Harassment Behavior. Life Sci J 2014;11(4):411-420] (ISSN: 1097-8135). http://www.lifesciencesite.com. 56
... Sexual aggression often first emerges in adolescence (White & Smith, 2004). In the Canadian context, Wolfe and Chiodo (2008) found a high prevalence of sexualized violent behaviors in high schools. Specifically, 30% of females and 24% of males reported that they had experienced physical victimization (being touched or grabbed in a sexual way). ...
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Sexual violence is a global phenomenon needing sustainable interventions. The article extends findings from media literacy scholars by exploring ways that critical media literacy (CML) pedagogies can be used to teach affirmative consent education for the purposes of violence prevention. The article is not a curriculum blue-print, as the pedagogies are still being piloted for adolescents in Ontario. However, the rationales for bridging consent education and critical media literacy apply transnationally. Engaging educators and students with critical analysis of media and creative media production is key to transformative learning about consent, within and beyond the classroom. The article ends by outlining methods that will be used to test the hypothesis that a CML approach rooted in social justice frameworks and best practices in violence prevention will improve the way affirmative consent is taught to adolescents.
... Sexual harassment can be understood as unwelcome gender and sex-related comments and behaviours, which can take the form of verbal (such as sexual comments or sexist jokes, taunts and rumours) or physical interaction, such as pulling their clothes or rubbing up against the person (Wolfe and Chiodo 2008). However, individual perceptions of such incidents are multiple and diverse; cultural contexts, personal experiences and exposure to information can shape what people understand as sexual harassment. ...
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What is the status of women in the discipline of International Relations (IR) in Brazil? This study provides a pioneering map of gender issues in Brazilian IR, focusing on inequality, discrimination and harassment. It includes a literature review as well as the findings of two sets of research: the first a survey of personal and professional issues faced by academic staff in Brazilian IR, and the second a report on the staffing of IR and related departments at private and public academic institutions in Brazil. Our research shows that despite the specificities of the Brazilian higher education system, Brazilian IR academics conform to international trends in respect of gender issues , facing monetary and/or familial inequalities and gender discrimination in their careers. It also shows that 25% of female academics have experienced undesired sexual contact at least once, and that there is a gap between male and female understandings of what constitutes sexual harassment.
... Sexual harassment can be understood as unwelcome gender and sex-related comments and behaviours, which can take the form of verbal (such as sexual comments or sexist jokes, taunts and rumours) or physical interaction, such as pulling their clothes or rubbing up against the person (Wolfe and Chiodo 2008). However, individual perceptions of such incidents are multiple and diverse; cultural contexts, personal experiences and exposure to information can shape what people understand as sexual harassment. ...
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Full-text available
What is the status of women in the discipline of International Relations (IR) in Brazil? This study provides a pioneering map of gender issues in Brazilian IR, focusing on inequality, discrimination and harassment. It includes a literature review as well as the findings of two sets of research: the first a survey of personal and professional issues faced by academic staff in Brazilian IR, and the second a report on the staffing of IR and related departments at private and public academic institutions in Brazil. Our research shows that despite the specificities of the Brazilian higher education system, Brazilian IR academics conform to international trends in respect of gender issues , facing monetary and/or familial inequalities and gender discrimination in their careers. It also shows that 25% of female academics have experienced undesired sexual contact at least once, and that there is a gap between male and female understandings of what constitutes sexual harassment.
... It is generally defined as the unwelcome attention of a sexual nature, occurring through verbal or physical interaction (Fogarty, 2008). Categorizing harassment, Wolfe and Chiodo (2008) said it can take on a physical form (such as pulling off clothing or rubbing against another person), as well as a verbal form (such as sexual comments, jeers, rumor spreading, or sexual jokes aimed at an individual). ...
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Sexual harassment is generally perceived as a social issue predominantly found in the workplace. However, it can also occur at various stages of youth and adolescence. University students who will soon join the workforce are equally vulnerable to sexual harassment. It is hypothesized that lack of understanding and awareness of what constitutes sexual harassment have made the youth easy targets of perpetrators. This study identifies the level of awareness and perceptions of sexual harassment among students in a public university of Malaysia. Being multiethnic and multicultural, Malaysia offers a diverse social demographic context for comparison across ethnic groups such as the Malay, Chinese, and Indian. This study further explores how gender, ethnicity, culture, and personal encounters shape one’s perceptions of sexual harassment. We hope this empirical study will shed light for stakeholders in youth development to address this critical but under-publicized youth issue. It is also noteworthy that this study does not support the literature that sexual harassment often leads to negative psychosocial effects. Instead, the findings show that prior experiences of sexual harassment actually increase the level of sensitivity in identifying and reacting to incidents of sexual harassment.
... Kosciw and colleagues (2012) also found that 33.8% of LGBTQ students were verbally harassed in the last year (17.3% frequently/daily and 16.5% often/weekly). Moreover, a 2008 survey conducted by the Centre for Addiction and Mental Health found that one third of boys (grades 9 through 11) reported being the targets of homophobic verbal harassment (Wolfe & Chiodo, 2008). Finally, Kosciw et al. (2012) found that LGBTQ students experienced high rates of homophobically based harassment in the previous year: target of mean lies/rumors (84.0%); electronic harassment/cyber-bullying (55.2%); and property theft or damage at school (47.7%). ...
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Abstract The goal of the study is to examine how location (nationally, compared to Canadian regions) is related to indicators of a hostile school environment for sexual minority youth, particularly when physical abuse is used as the outcome variable. Data representing 5766 Canadian students were analyzed using bivariate and multivariate techniques. Results from the multivariate analyses showed that non-physical abuse was the most significant predictor of homophobically-based physical abuse, for both LGBQ and non-LGBQ students. Findings reiterate the importance of considering the progression of harmful events as an escalation of violence as well as the need to view homophobic bullying as having a significant impact on all students. Finally, while the presence of homophobia is prevalent across all Canadian regions, there are nevertheless, many regional differences, which could be used to inform region-specific action plans.
... Hibino (2006) also found that 55.8% of the 473 respondents had experienced sexual harassment, and all except 2 stated that their perpetrator were men 1 . So as other studies conducted in overseas which showed similar results that most of the perpetrator are men 2,8,20,21,22,23 . ...
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This study focuses on sexual harassment, a form of psycological hazard that female registered nurses face throughout their day to day routine. The objective of this study is to find the prevalence of sexual harassment among female registered nurses working in government hospitals in Melaka, Malaysia and factors affecting them. This is a cross sectional study conducted on 455 female registered nurses who have worked more than one year in the present 3 government hospitals in Melaka, Malaysia. A validated and pre tested questionnaires were given for the respondents to answer. Before respondents answer the questionaires, they are required to read the definition and the forms of sexual harassment provided. This is to help them to understand the correct definition and forms of sexual harassment that they could have experienced. The researcher is available during the distribution of the questionnaires and the respondents are free to ask the researcher anything that they do not understand about it. The results of this study show that the prevalence of sexual harassment among these nurses was 51.2% with the past one year incidence recorded at 22.8%. The most common forms of sexual harassment were verbal (46.6% ), visual (24.8% ), psycological (20.9%), physical (20.7%) and non -verbal (16.7% ). The study showed that 74.7% of the victims suffered from psychological effects brought upon by their encounter with various types of sexual harrasement at work. The study also found that the victims' self-perception of their physicality was a contributing factor to the prevalance of this situation. Those who were pretty, with attractive body figure, a friendly character and easy going had a higher prevalence of sexual harassment in the workplace. Meanwhile, those who were strict, and those who had a fierce character were not prone to sexual harassment. The prevalence of sexual harassment among registered nurses in the workplace found in this study was high and self-perception profile of the victims of sexual harassment was the main contributing factor to the problem. Sexual harassment in the workplace should not be taken lightly because the resulting effects was not only felt by the victims, but also by their family members, colleagues and patients under their care. Hence, steps should be taken by the hospital managements to manage and prevent this problem from occuring again in the future.
... While some solicitations are designed to lead to an offline sexual encounter, very few actually do. Some of this contact can be understood as "flirting" (McQuade & Sampat, 2008;Smith, 2007), and many solicitations are simply meant to be harassing (Biber, Doverspike, Baznik, Cober, & Ritter, 2002;Finn, 2004;Wolfe & Chiodo, 2008). ...
Chapter
Available literature suggests that research that seeks to effect social change in communities must be largely informed by the views of those most affected. Yet, evidence also suggests that such research involves both methodological and ethical challenges. For example, our own work, which focuses on understanding and addressing sexual violence with girls in southern African rural contexts, the focus of this chapter, suggests that gender, social class, age, and geographic location, among other issues, are all critical. Thus, using our work on sexual violence with girls in rural KwaZulu‐Natal, South Africa as an illustrative case study, this chapter examines the benefits and challenges that arise from the use of “girl‐method” in doing research. In particular, it examines the ways in which participatory visual methods might address the methodological and ethical issues that arise in the context of unequal gender norms and cultural taboos in such research.
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The present study examined the link between sexual orientation and adjustment in a community sample of 97 sexual minority (gay male, lesbian, bisexual, and questioning) high school students, taking into account their experiences of peer victimization and social support within peer and family contexts. Adolescents were identified in a large-scale survey study conducted at 5 high schools. They were matched to a comparison sample of their heterosexual peers. Sexual minority adolescents reported more externalizing behaviors and depression symptoms than heterosexual youth. Compared to their heterosexual peers, sexual minority youth reported more sexual harassment, more bullying, less closeness with their mothers, and less companionship with their best friends. There were no significant differences between gay male, lesbian, bisexual, and questioning adolescents. Overall, both victimization and social support mediated the link between sexual orientation and psychosocial symptoms. Among sexual minority youth, the link between social support and externalizing was mediated by experiences of peer victimization. These findings highlight the contextual risk and protective factors associated with non-heterosexual sexual orientation in accounting for the emotional and behavioral problems in this population.
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The goal of this investigation was to examine gender differences in experiences of sexual harassment during military service and the negative mental health symptoms associated with these experiences. Female (n = 2,319) and male (n = 1,627) former reservists were surveyed about sexual harassment during their military service and current mental health symptoms. As expected, women reported a higher frequency of sexual harassment. Further, women had increased odds of experiencing all subtypes of sexual harassment. Being female conferred the greatest risk for experiencing the most serious forms of harassment. For both men and women, sexual harassment was associated with more negative current mental health. However, at higher levels of harassment, associations with some negative mental health symptoms were stronger for men than women. Although preliminary, the results of this investigation suggest that although women are harassed more frequently than men, clinicians must increase their awareness of the potential for sexual harassment among men in order to provide the best possible care to all victims of harassment.
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The present study surveyed the prevalence of sexual harassment among high school students. A total of 1,582 students from 18 schools completed a version of the American Association of University Women (1993) survey. Reported sexual harassment events were restricted to those that: a) had been experienced first-hand, b) had occurred within the preceding two weeks, and c) were reported by students who were notably upset by their experiences. Despite this stringent approach, sexual harassment was found to be a significant problem in high schools. Fifteen percent of students were both sexually harassed and very or somewhat upset by their harassment experiences. Nearly half of these upset students were recipients of physical forms of sexual harassment. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2012 APA, all rights reserved)
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The present research explores risk factors for, and longitudinal associations of, sexual harassment by peers during adolescence. Eight-hundred and seventy-two African American and European American adolescents (65.4% African American, 51.1% females) were assessed during the summer after the eighth grade (mean age=14.2 years) and then again in the 11th grade (mean age=17.1 years). At the first assessment, adolescents were asked about their experiences with sexual harassment, their psychological reactions to sexual harassment, and also about their peer relationships, perceived pubertal timing, problem behavior, and mental health. At the second assessment, adolescents reported on their problem behavior and mental health. In general, youth who associated with peers who were involved in problem behavior were at risk for victimization. Among females, those who perceived themselves to be experiencing early pubertal development were also at risk. Additionally, for some adolescents, sexual harassment predicted later adjustment difficulties.
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The impact of bullying and sexual harassment on six health outcomes among middle school girls were compared to these outcomes among high school girls. High school girls experienced more bullying and sexual harassment and poorer health outcomes than their middle school counterparts, but the impact of these experiences was less among high school students. Differences in outcomes may be the result of better support systems and coping mechanisms among high school girls and/or challenging developmental changes during middle school. Sexual orientation, race, and disability had some notable relationships to bullying and sexual harassment experiences as well as health outcomes.