Article

Free end effects on the near wake flow structure behind a finite circular cylinder. J Wind Eng Ind Aerodyn

Journal of Wind Engineering and Industrial Aerodynamics (Impact Factor: 1.41). 12/2000; 88(2-3):231-246. DOI: 10.1016/S0167-6105(00)00051-9

ABSTRACT

The free end effect on the near wake of a finite circular cylinder in a cross flow has been investigated experimentally. Three finite cylinders with aspect ratios (L=D) of 6, 10 and 13 were tested in a subsonic wind tunnel at a Reynolds number of 20 000. A hot-wire anemometer was employed to measure the wake velocity. Mean pressure distributions on the cylinder surface were also measured. The flow near the free end was visualized to observe the flow structure qualitatively in a circulating water channel. The experimental results from these finite cylinder (FC) models were compared with those of a two-dimensional circular cylinder. The flow past the FC free end shows a complicated three-dimensional wake structure. As the FC aspect ratio decreases, the vortex shedding frequency is decreased and the vortex formation region is elongated. The free end effect becomes dominant close to the FC free end. The three-dimensionality of the FC wake may be attributed mainly to the strong entrainment of irrotational fluids, caused by the downwash of counter-rotating vortices separated from the FC free end. The downwash flow is concentrated in the central region of the wake. A peculiar flow structure having a 24 Hz frequency component was observed near the free end using spectral analysis and cross-correlation of the velocity signals. This 24 Hz frequency component is closely related to the counter-rotating twin vortices formed near the FC free end.

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