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'Made in Italy' in China: From Country of Origin to Country Concept Branding

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Abstract

Chinese consumers recognize in Italian products a high added value and, in some cases, consider them preferable to other products. The success around the world of items ‘‘Made in Italy’’ is mostly due to the Italian brand’s ability to transfer a certain sense of product quality in concert with values and experiences of beauty, elegance, tradition, luxury, and life quality. In a context, in which the Chinese consumer grows in appreciating products made in China, items made in Italy will have to evolve and consolidate more as an “Italian Country Concept”, transferring, when possible, the manufacture to China and fostering the brand intangible components. Many among the affirmed brands are tending in the direction of this conceptual transition, and maintaining the distinguished Italian style has achieved internationally recognized connotations and stylistic characteristics recognized all around the world. The paper analyzes the main success components of the Italian brand and the opportunity for further growth in the Chinese market. The study is based on quantitative and qualitative data that will provide a basis for further analysis and research.

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... This has led to additional consumer questions/ concerns on the importance of brand origin since many of the multinational companies have developed production facilities in countries where manufacturing costs were lower to gain competitive price advantages but product quality was not an inherent trait of the culture. This practice often raises questions about product quality and value (Snaiderbaur, 2010) As a result; many countries have developed labeling laws that require a clear indication of the COO. Also, advertising rules may bar illegitimate claims such as "designed in" vs "made in". ...
... Also, advertising rules may bar illegitimate claims such as "designed in" vs "made in". Thus, increasingly, consumers are finding that products are produced in one country and branded in other another, sometimes causing confusion and concern (Snaiderbaur, 2010). ...
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... Taking into account fact that Gucci, Chanel, Dolce & Gabbana, Cavalli, Armani, Yves Saint Laurent, and Lacroix are (just some of) Italian or French luxury brands, the share of luxury brands in fashion industry is expected to be even higher. The success around the world of items "Made in Italy" is mostly due to the Italian brand's ability to transfer a certain sense of product quality in concert with values and experiences of beauty, elegance, tradition, luxury, and life quality [36]. ...
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Chapter
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