Does obstetrician knowledge regarding influenza increase HINI vaccine acceptance among their pregnant patients?

ArticleinVaccine 30(39):5782-4 · June 2012with6 Reads
Impact Factor: 3.62 · DOI: 10.1016/j.vaccine.2012.06.032 · Source: PubMed

    Abstract

    Although numerous studies have demonstrated the safety and benefits of influenza vaccination in pregnancy, vaccination rates of pregnant women have remained low. The objective of this study is to evaluate whether physicians' level of knowledge regarding H1N1 influenza in pregnancy is associated with vaccination frequency among their patients.
    Between October 2009 and May 2010, all obstetricians (attending and resident physicians) at an urban tertiary care hospital were asked to complete a test that assessed knowledge of influenza. During this same time period, the vaccination status of all inpatient parturients was recorded. Associations between physician characteristics, physician test scores, and patient vaccination rates were assessed.
    110 providers (85% of those eligible) belonging to 16 practices completed the knowledge assessment. The mean (±SD) test score was 72% (±11%). Provider test scores were not associated with whether the provider was a trainee, the number of years since completion of training, or provider age. Test scores were not correlated with the number of providers or number of deliveries per month in a given practice. Mean scores were significantly higher (75% vs 68%, p=004) among those who attended a hospital-sponsored educational forum on H1N1, and were positively and significantly associated with the percentage of patients cared for by that group who were vaccinated against H1N1 influenza (r=.50, p=.045).
    Increased physician knowledge regarding H1N1 influenza, represented as higher test scores on a knowledge assessment test, was significantly associated with the frequency of H1N1 vaccination among their patients.