ArticlePDF Available

L’identità personale nella disabilità: Rilettura secondo il modello sociale

Authors:

Abstract

The social and cultural perspective about persons with disabilities has substantially modified the consideration of the disability personal identity (Finkelstein, 1980; Oliver, 1990; Shakespeare, 1996). It is here presented, in succession, both the reformulation of the construct onto the disability personal identity accordingly to the adoption of the social model and, in the second part, statistical results obtained from a research onto
A preview of the PDF is not available
Article
Full-text available
The social and cultural perspective about persons with disabilities has substantially modified the consideration of the disability personal identity (Finkelstein, 1980; Oliver, 1990; Shakespeare, 1996). It is here presented, in succession, both the reformulation of the construct onto the disability personal identity accordingly to the adoption of the social model and, in the second part, statistical results obtained from a research onto
Article
Full-text available
What is the case for and how would one begin to construct a sociology of impairment? This paper argues that the realignment of the disability/impairment distinction is vital for the identity politics of the disability movement. The body is at the heart of contemporary political and theoretical debate, yet the social model of disability makes it an exile. The transformation of the body from a reactionary to an emancipatory concept implies a sociology of impairment. This paper explores the contribution that post-structuralism and phenomenology might make to this end.
Article
This paper re-theorises disability by asking the following question: within what historical, social, economic and political conditions does disability as an analytic of difference get constructed in a dialectical relationship with gender, class, caste and race? To respond to this question, I will first offer a materialist reading of the category of disability. I will then situate this discussion in an ethnographic study of a voluntary organisation in South India which provides residential as well as rehabilitational services for disabled children. Finally, I will discuss the politics of gendered 'caring work' and its implications for the continued production of marginalised difference. In doing this, I will thus demonstrate how disability can be re-understood as an ideological condition which is also structured by the same exploitative material conditions of capitalism as are race, caste, class and gender.
Article
This article arises from a research project involving the disabled members' group in UNISON, and problematises the social model which explicitly undergirds the discourses and practices of this group. In abstract terms, there are dangers that the social model can be interpreted in a way which privileges some impaired identities over others, sanctions a separatist ghetto which cannot reach out to other groups of disabled and disadvantaged people, and weaves a tangled web around researchers who adhere to the emancipatory paradigm. In concrete terms, these dangers are explored with reference to the stories of impaired people who believe that they are excluded from the disabled members' group, the predicaments of ex-disabled and differently-disabled people in relation to the movement, and the culture of suspicion surrounding academics, particularly the 'non-disabled' researcher as would-be ally. It is argued that, whilst such identities and issues might appear to be 'marginal' ones in the sense of occurring at the boundary of disabled communities, disability politics and disability studies, they should not be 'marginalised' by disabled activists and academics, and indeed that they pose challenges to our collective identities, social movements, theoretical models and research paradigms which need to be addressed.
Article
The paper reviews common uses of models and terminology, then sketches a few social responses to disablement in historical Zoroastrian, Jaina and Daoist philosophies. Accompanying a discussion of the 'merits of uselessness', Chuang-tzu's holistic social model is reconstructed. A Buddhist tale of 'hunchback Khujjutara' suggests that karma may usefully be seen as an educational, rather than retributive force. Contested histories of blind Japanese and Chinese people, and the dramatic enactment of contradictory behaviour towards them, support the view that Asian meanings of disablement should not be forced into modern European categories, but may challenge and refresh them.
Article
Whilst the Disabled People's Movement has necessarily evolved from a consciousness of disability as central to its participants' identities, and a critique of disablism as endemic to institutional discrimination, academics and activists in various civil rights movements are increasingly perturbed by the personal and political dangers generated by an adherence to 'identity politics' simpliciter. The actual complexities of social life-in particular, the multiple dimensions of identities and the matrices of interlocking discriminationshave propelled us towards a politics of difference. Since a shift of premises and even paradigms is the prerequisite of such a politics, it will inevitably encounter resistance from some sections of our respective movements. This article addresses some aspects of this emerging politics of difference with reference to the self-organised groups in UNISON, the UK's public sector trade union, where the disabled members' group co-exists with groups for women, black people and lesbians and gay men, so that the politics of identity is always already entwined with the politics of difference. Three main themes are pursued-the attempts to transform occasional inter-group collaborations into sustainable inter-group coalitions; the mobilisation of differences across groups in the service of enhancing democracy within groups; and the struggles to accommodate to a burgeoning intra-group diversity.
Article
The paper identifies the myth of bodily perfection as one that permeates the dominant culture of late 20th century Western civilization, and points to ways in which the myth supports the creation of an illusory category of people called 'the disabled'. Grounded in an understanding of disability as socially constructed, and drawing on the experiences of women with disabilities, the paper further points to important differences in social expectations depending on whether one has disabilities that are visible or invisible. In discussions of disability, however, disabilities that are not visible are often ignored. It is concluded that this contributes to the widespread denial of disability and is oppressive.