Article

Breast cancer and obesity, a dangerous relation

Centre pluridisciplinaire d'oncologie, CHUV, 1011 Lausanne.
Revue médicale suisse 05/2012; 8(342):1101-4.
Source: PubMed

ABSTRACT

Obesity is associated with different cancers including breast cancer, whose incidence is increased in postmenopausal women. It has an adverse impact on the prognosis of the patients, regardless of their menopausal status. The fact of receiving a systemic adjuvant therapy does not neutralize the prognostic role of obesity. Moderate weight loss after cancer diagnosis could improve the outcome of the patients, while a weight gain during treatment seems without significant effect. Currently available data are still too incomplete to justify systematic programs to lose weight with an oncologic therapeutic aim. However, it is worth to encourage and support our patients to have an optimal diet, physical activity, and to lose weight as promotion of general health.

3 Followers
 · 
25 Reads
  • Source
    • "However, environmental factors are more readily controlled than genetic and racial factors (Bhurgri 2004). The most common risk factors are excessive estrogen stimuli (Cheung 2007), higher birth weight (Silva et al., 2008), obesity (Zaman et al., 2012), over expression of leptin in adipose tissue (Wafa et al., 2014), and family history of breast and ovarian cancer (Hankinson 2008). However, 5-10% of all breast malignancy is due to genetic predisposition caused by mutation in autosomal dominant genes. "

    Full-text · Article · Oct 2015
  • Source
    • "However, environmental factors are more readily controlled than genetic and racial factors (Bhurgri 2004). The most common risk factors are excessive estrogen stimuli (Cheung 2007), higher birth weight (Silva et al., 2008), obesity (Zaman et al., 2012), over expression of leptin in adipose tissue (Wafa et al., 2014), and family history of breast and ovarian cancer (Hankinson 2008). However, 5-10% of all breast malignancy is due to genetic predisposition caused by mutation in autosomal dominant genes. "
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Breast cancer is the most common malignancy in women worldwide. Various environmental and genetic factors are involved in breast carcinogenesis. Mutations in autosomal dominant genes account for 5-10% of breast cancer cases. It is also the most common female malignancy in Pakistan and account for 35.6% of all cancers in women. BRCA1 and BRCA2 are the key genes associated with familial and early-onset breast cancer in Pakistan. However, mutation in TP53, RAD51 and CHEK2 genes play the marginal role. In this review, the spectrums of genetic mutations associated with breast cancer in Pakistan are discussed in detail.
    Full-text · Article · Sep 2015
  • Source
    • "Many researchers have concluded that breast cancer is the cumulative result of multiple environmental factors and genetic alterations [2]. Risk factors for breast cancer include estrogen stimulation [3], high birth weight [4], obesity [5], and family history of breast cancer [6, 7]. In addition, genome-wide association studies provide evidence that genetic factors are important in the pathogenesis of breast cancer [8]. "
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: The vitamin D receptor (VDR) is a crucial mediator for the cellular effects of vitamin D. A great number of studies regarding the association between BsmI polymorphism in the VDR gene and breast cancer have been published. However, the results have been contradicting. Therefore, we conducted a meta-analysis to re-examine the controversy. Published literatures from PubMed, Embase, and Chinese Biomedical Literature Database (CBM) were searched (updated to July 10, 2013). The principal outcome measure was the odds ratio (OR) with 95 % confidence interval (CI) for breast cancer risk associated with VDR BsmI polymorphism. With all studies involved, the meta-analysis results suggest no statistically significant association between VDR BsmI polymorphism and breast cancer risk (B vs. b, OR = 0.922, 95 % CI = 0.836–1.018, P = 0.108, I2 = 80.0 %; BB vs. bb, OR = 0.843, 95 % CI = 0.697–1.021, P = 1.75, I2 = 75.5 %; Bb vs. bb, OR = 0.930, 95 % CI = 0.814–1.063, P = 0.31, I2 = 73.1 %; BB+Bb vs. bb, OR = 0.906, 95 % CI = 0.787–1.043, P = 1.37, I2 = 78.7 %; BB vs. bb+Bb, OR = 0.899, 95 % CI = 0.786–1.028, P = 1.56, I2 = 61.0 %). The results were not changed when studies were stratified by ethnicity or source of controls. This meta-analysis suggested that there were no associations between VDR BsmI polymorphism and breast cancer.
    Preview · Article · Nov 2013 · Tumor Biology
Show more